Tag Archive: Art


The classic western, Gunfight at the OK Corral (1957), is based on an actual event that transpired, in Tombstone, Arizona, USA, in the late 19th Century. There was a gunfight between the Earp brothers and the Clanton clan of outlaws, that lasted 30 seconds, and this movie traces the steps that led to the disastrously notorious shootout, at OK Corral, on, 26th of October, 1881.

The Arrival of a Lady!! It’s interesting to note, how the people of the town are dressed is similar earthly tones, blending into the backdrop. Contrasting to the greyish, reddish & brownish hues, we see a lady dressed in dark green with a green parasol. This use of contrasting colour, in the scene, itself tells us, that she’s an outsider, and all the townsfolk notice her. Added to which, from her attire and elegant gait, one can tell, that she’s a classy lady, travelling through. The fact she’s a lady, is further confirmed later on, with her sophisticated mannerisms and eloquent speech. And she’s a bold woman, from the 19th century, not afraid to travel on her own. This is none other than the arrival of Laura Denbow (played by Rhonda Fleming), a very respectable charcter. Yet she finds herself in trouble with the law, on her first day in town. She’s arrested and imprisoned, for playing a man’s game, i.e. Poker. For the law of that state, prohibits women from gambling. It’s OK for men to gamble though. Soon the lady in question and the towns Sheriff, Wyatt Earp (Burt Lancaster), who arrested her, would fall for each other, and decide to marry. But fate would have something else in store.

The Arrival of a Lady!!
It’s interesting to note, how the people of the town are dressed is similar earthly tones, blending into the backdrop. Contrasting to the greyish, reddish & brownish hues, we see a lady dressed in dark green with a green parasol. This use of contrasting colour, in the scene, itself tells us, that she’s an outsider, and all the townsfolk notice her. Added to which, from her attire and elegant gait, one can tell, that she’s a classy lady, travelling through. The fact she’s a lady, is further confirmed later on, with her sophisticated mannerisms and eloquent speech. And she’s a bold woman, from the 19th century, not afraid to travel on her own. This is none other than the arrival of Laura Denbow (played by Rhonda Fleming), a very respectable charcter. Yet she finds herself in trouble with the law, on her first day in town. She’s arrested and imprisoned, for playing a man’s game, i.e. Poker. For the law of that state, prohibits women from gambling. It’s OK for men to gamble though. Soon the lady in question and the towns Sheriff, Wyatt Earp (Burt Lancaster), who arrested her, would fall for each other, and decide to marry. But fate would have something else in store.

Lawman, Wyatt Earp (Burt Lancaster), of Dodge City, Kansas, USA, on the verge of getting married to his beloved, Laura Denbow (Rhonda Fleming), receives a letter from his brother asking him to help clean up an outlaw mess in Tombstone, Arizona. In Tombstone, Earp, discovers Ike Clanton (Lyle Bettger) is involved in stealing Mexican cattle. Wyatt Earp, now being made US Marshal, with authority over the whole country, bans the use of firearms in Tombstone. Having failed to bribe Earp, Clanton, with murderous intent, isn’t happy, and accidentally kills the youngest of the Earp brothers. Now Wyatt Earp, has only vengeance in his mind, and along with his brothers, and Doc Holliday (Kirk Douglas), sought out to get rid of the Clanton menace for good.

As the Sheriff is away, having romantic moment in the woods, with his beloved, the mob comes into town, and disrupts everything.

As the Sheriff is away, having romantic moment in the woods, with his beloved, the mob comes into town, and disrupts everything.

The look of the movie is simply amazing. Love the impressive cinematography by Charles Lang. The dusty backdrops of cowboy country, is beautifully captured, and the use of colour to symbolically focus on a trait of personality, is used to perfection. It’s interesting to note how well the sets are designed, in dull brownish hues, along with certain costumes (designed by the famed Edith Head) used to compliment or contrast the backdrop, as an allegory to showcase, the difference between characters, who tend to belong to this desert town, blending into the landscape, and who doesn’t. Secondary, is the storyline, that’s based on a real historical incident, and how well the narrative works in the movie. Not a dull moment, though told in a very relaxed manner, building up the characters, of ordinary people of a small town, and showcasing how they ultimately end up being involved in a, willingly or unwillingly, historical moment in time, with which their names would simultaneously end up being associated with. Watch out for a very young Dennis Hopper, as the little brother of Ike Clanton, who’s unwillingly forced to join his brother, against the Earps & Holliday.

A young, baby faced, Dennis Hopper, as Billy, the kid brother of the Clanton’s, who innocently gets roped in on the gunfight.

A young, baby faced, Dennis Hopper, as Billy, the kid brother of the Clanton’s, who innocently gets roped in on the gunfight.

Produced by Hal B. Wallis, directed by John Sturges, and starring Burt Lancaster and Kirk Douglas in the lead, this is a really interesting movie to sit through. It chronicles the tale of how a peace loving sheriff, who doesn’t even carry a gun, is forced to lead a gunfight against a lynch mob. The cast is brilliant, as is the story line. Love the cinematography, and the set décor. It’s thanks to this combination that the film happens to be amongst the most celebrated of Hollywood westerns. But yet, it’s no where as great as, High Noon (1952), The Searchers (1956), The Misfits (1961), The Outrage (1964) and 3:10 to Yuma (2007), to name some excellent Hollywood films of the ‘Western’ genre; or near excellent flicks like, The Left Handed Gun (1958), The Unforgiven (1960), Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969) and Australia’s The Proposition (2005). Still, Gunfight at the OK Corral, is a really enjoyable flick, in league with famed westerns like, Love Me Tender (1956), Rio Bravo (1959), A Fistful of Dollars (1964) and Unforgiven (1992).

Watched Gunfight at the OK Corral, on Monday, 14th September, 2015. One of the DVD’s I brought from Australia in November 2014 (Also see my 200th post Holidaying in Australia, comes to an end). I still have a few movies, I bought Down Under, left to watch. The last one I watched, was This Property is Condemned (1966), back in May 2015 (see my posts Condemnation of a woman during the Depression era of the American south, Mai May Movies 2015 and Classic Movie History Project Blogathon – 1966: The Year dubbed as Nineteen Sexty Sex). Prior to that I managed to watch quite few of those DVD’s last year in November/December 2014, itself. Also see my post Gunfire @ OK Quarrel on my new website, from today itself.

Gunfight at the OK Corral (1957)
My Rating: Very Good!! 8/10!!!!

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense
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Day of Depression

Your Roots Can Enslave You by Ion Vincent Danu

Your Roots Can Enslave You by Ion Vincent Danu

Going through a great deal depression today, more than usual. I try my best to survive in this god awful hell hole. Have been for the last six years. Blogging helps, yet even trying to get a blog post done, has been an impossibility lately. I generally tend to have a lot of patience. But today it all just blew apart. I just couldn’t take it anymore. I feel sick inside. Yet, am a survivor. Beats me why? And what for? I tried to do all kinds of stuff to try and distract me, but nothing seems to work today. So ultimately am here blogging; an unexpected, unplanned, blogpost. What better way to try and let go of this unhappiness I feel, by writing a post. Then again, posting this painting; titled, Your Roots Can Enslave You, by (Romanian born) Canadian artist, Ion Vincent Danu; is an even better way to portray, through art, what I’m going through. It sums up how I feel at this very moment, stuck in a narrow minded society, which constantly tries to drag me down. Someday I shall escape all this. At least that false hope is what keeps me going.

Pouring my heart out.
Nuwan Sen

Kolkata Traffic Police use a Poster depicting The Beatles famed Abbey Road Picture, to get pedestrians to stop jaywalking, in India.

Kolkata Traffic Police use a Poster depicting The Beatles famed Abbey Road Picture, to get pedestrians to stop jaywalking, in India.

The fab four known as  were the most influential British band of the last century. Though they lasted just one decade (as a group), from 1962 to 1970, their iconic status, shall never diminish. Here’s a look at various Beatle loving artists’ creations, using techniques derived from various art movements, that existed pre, during & post, . (Also see my  #01 to #33 from March 2013 to February 2014). For this Blog-Post, I’ve incorporated my aesthetic knowledge with my love for this iconic 60’s Boy Band!!!!

RENAISSANCE ART
(Beginning in Italy, renaissance artistic styles date back to the 1200’s, a style that lasted till about mid-17th century)
Beatles RenaissanceFamous artists of this movement include, Paolo Uccello, Piero Della Francesca, Sandro Botticelli, Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, Michelangelo, Caravaggio, Artemisia Gentileschi (the first woman to dare to become an artist, in that era, and thus condemned for it), Giovanni Bellini, Jan Van Eyck, Joos van Cleve, and many many others.

REALISM (a.k.a. NATURALISM)
(famous in the 1850’s, lasted a very short period of time)

The Beatles by Eduard Kazaryan - Kok Tobe Mountain in Almaty, Kazakhstan

The Beatles by Eduard Kazaryan – Kok Tobe Mountain in Almaty, Kazakhstan

Though Realism was a trend that was famous, during the 1850’s, the seeds of Realism, are present way back in the late 1700’s. If you see works like Francisco Goya’s Retrato de Martín Zapater from the 1790’s & The Family of Charles IV, from Year 1800, or Eugène Delacroix’s Portrait of Dr. François-Marie Desmaisons, from 1832-33, those are very realistic and somewhat dull, portraiture works of art.

Tom Murphy's The Beatles in The Liverpool Art Cafe

Tom Murphy’s The Beatles in The Liverpool Art Cafe

Some famous artists that existed during this period, included, Gustave Courbet, Théodore Géricault, Honoré Daumier, Karl Bryullov, Jean-Hippolyte Flandrin and Rosa Bonheur, to name a few. Being a successful artist of the 19th century, Rosa Bonheur represented the New Woman (a feminist ideal that emerged in the 19th century, which in turn influenced feminism of the 20th Century).

MODERN ART (a.k.a. MODERNISM)
(Late 19th & early 20th Century)
Modern Art styles that existed within the last two centuries, happen to be my favourite, after the Renaissance period. Although, I do love the Romantics and the Realist, of the 18th Century too, yet not to the same extent as the Renaissance or the Modern. There’ve been various art movements within Modern Art, from Impressionists to Surrealist. Surrealism happens to be my favourite art movement, and Salvador Dalí, my all time favourite artist, ever since I discovered him (and his work), as a teenager in the 1990’s.

Impressionism/Post-Impressionism (two avant-garde art movement)  
(Prominent during 1870’s & 1880’s)

The Beatles (Abbey Road) watercolor by Fabrizio Cassetta

The Beatles (Abbey Road) watercolour by Fabrizio Cassetta

LeRoy Neiman The Beatles Painting

LeRoy Neiman The Beatles Painting

The Beatles watercolor by Fabrizio Cassetta

The Beatles watercolour by Fabrizio Cassetta

The Beatles by Paul Meijering

The Beatles by Paul Meijering

My favourite Impressionist artists include Paul Cézanne, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Edgar Degas, Claude Monet, Vincent Van Gogh, Paul Gauguin, Henri de Toulouse Lautrec, Camille Pissarro, Gustav Klimt, Édouard Manet, Amrita Sher-Gil, Cristóbal Rojas, Dragan Mihailovic, Alfred Munnings, Harold & Laura Knight, Florence Carter Wood, Isaak Brodsky, Eugène Delacroix, Albert Tucker, Arthur Boyd, Paul Cadmus, etc etc…. When it comes to Impressionist/Post-Impressionist artists, majority of my favourite artists, as a collective, exist from this particular period.

The Beatles watercolour (Artist Unknown)

The Beatles watercolour (Artist Unknown)

The Beatles watercolour (Artist Unknown)

The Beatles watercolour (Artist Unknown)

Art Nouveau (an avant-garde art movement)  
(1890’s to 1910’s)

John Lennon of The Beatles (Artist Unknown)

John Lennon of The Beatles (Artist Unknown)

Alphonse Mucha, Antoni Gaudí, Gustav Klimt, Jules Chéret and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, to name a few, were a part of the Art Nouveau movement.

The Beatles - Art Nouveau (Artist Unknown)

The Beatles – Art Nouveau (Artist Unknown)

Expressionism (an avant-garde art movement)  
(Early 20th Century)

Curt McDowell's nude Beatles

Curt McDowell’s nude Beatles

Gustave Moreau, Egon Schiele, Lucian Freud, Antoni Gaudí and Edvard Munch, were some of the famous Expressionist artists.

Ken White's nude Beatles

Ken White’s nude Beatles

Cubism (an avant-garde art movement)   
(Starting from the early 20th century, from 1910’s onwards)

Beatles Cubist (Artist Unknown)

Beatles Cubist (Artist Unknown)

Beatles Cubist (Artist Unknown)

Beatles Cubist (Artist Unknown)

The Beatles (Unknown Artist)

The Beatles (Unknown Artist)

David Adickes The Beatles

David Adickes’ The Beatles

The Beatles Monument (aprx 7000 pounds & 36 ft) in Houston, USA

The Beatles Monument (aprx 7000 pounds & 36 ft) in Houston, USA

The Beatles Monument (aprx 7000 pounds & 36 ft) LargeThe great Cubists include, Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque, Jean Metzinger, Marcel Duchamp, Juan Gris and Albert Gleizes, to name some. Henri Matisse, Henry Moore, Jackson Pollack, Amedeo Modigliani, Piet Mondrian, Sidney Nolan and M.F. Hussain, happen to be some other famous artists known for artworks involving distortion & abstract.

The Beatles (Artist Unknown)

The Beatles (Artist Unknown)

Tom Whalen's The Beatles

Tom Whalen’s The Beatles

The Four Musicians (Beatles) - This is a direct copy of The Three Musicians by Pablo Picasso

The Four Musicians (Beatles) – This is a direct copy of The Three Musicians by Pablo Picasso

Surrealism (an avant-garde art movement)   
(From the 1920’s onwards)

The Beatles (Artist Unknown)

The Beatles (Artist Unknown)

Insects Beatles - beetles artwork (Artist Unknown)

Insects (Beatles) – beetles artwork (Artist Unknown)

Beatles Surreal (Artist Unknown)

Beatles Surreal (Artist Unknown)

The Beatles painting by Daniel Janda

The Beatles painting by Daniel Janda

The Yellow Submarine by Belius

The Yellow Submarine by Belius

Surrealism – with Dreamy, Psychological, Freudian (Sigmund Freud, not Lucian Freud) & Fantastical elements – happens to be my favourite art movement ever, especially from the modernist era. Not just in art, but also in literature & cinema. As is Magical realism. Salvador Dalí, happens to be my all time favourite artist ever. Georgia O’Keeffe, Frida Kahlo, Diego Rivera, René Magritte, Terry Gilliam and Giorgio de Chirico are some other influential surrealists.

The Beatles & Elvis Presley (Artist Unknown)

The Beatles & Elvis Presley (Artist Unknown)

The Beatles by A.Pedicelli

The Beatles by A.Pedicelli

Sam Van Olffen's Beatles

Sam Van Olffen’s Beatles

The Beatles by David Ballinger

The Beatles by David Ballinger

POST-MODERNISM
(The 1950’s, 60’,70’s & early 80’s)
The most popular art form during Post-modernist era, no doubt was Pop Art styles of Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, Martin Sharp, Richard Avedon, George Segal, Tom Wesselmann, Wayne Thiebaud et al. Other post modernists artists include Harold Stevenson, Duane Hanson, David Salle, Claes Oldenburg, Susan Rothenberg, Robert Moskowitz, Wes Wilson, Pablo Amaringo, Yoko Ono, David Vaughan, Robert Mapplethorpe, Jörn Pfab and Brett Whiteley, to name some greats.

The Beatles sculpture by Jörn Pfab (1970) in Hamburg, Germany

The Beatles sculpture by Jörn Pfab (1970) in Hamburg, Germany

David Wynne in 1964 with his sculpture of The Beatles

David Wynne in 1964 with his sculpture of The Beatles

Terry McGunigle and Joe Forrest  created the 8x16ft  Mount Fab Four

Terry McGunigle and Joe Forrest created the 8x16ft Mount Fab Four

Spirit of The Beatles by Kris Atkinson

Spirit of The Beatles by Kris Atkinson

The Beatles (Artist Unknown)

The Beatles (Artist Unknown)

The Beatles by Hector Monroy

The Beatles by Hector Monroy

Pop Art (an avant-garde art movement)  
(from the mid-1950’s to the early 80’s)

Richard Avedon's The Beatles

Richard Avedon’s The Beatles
from 1967

Los Beatles (Artist Unknown)

Los Beatles (Artist Unknown)

With it’s psychedelic hues and acid painting techniques, Pop Art happens to be my favourite Post-Modernist medium.

Beatles - Beetles on Abbey-Road (Artist Unknown)

Beatles – Beetles on Abbey-Road (Artist Unknown)

ART AFTER POST-MODERNISM (a.k.a. POST-POST-MODERNISM)
(Emerging towards the end of 1980’s decade, and into the 21st century)

The latest trends of art (from the late 80’s onwards), includes the deconstructive styles of Blobism (or Bloberism), an architectural movement, inspired by the 50’s, Sci-fi, B-movie, The Blob (1958), starring Steve McQueen, in his first leading role. Architect Frank Gehry happens to one of the most well known faces behind, the amoeba shaped building designs, known as, Bloberism.

The Beatles - Poultry chicken wire by Ivan Lovatt

The Beatles – Poultry chicken wire by Ivan Lovatt

Yet, one of the latest trends in art today, is the Re-use of Refuse, using all kinds of waste material, letting nothing go to waste, including bodily fluids.

The Beatles rubber soul by Darin Shock

The Beatles rubber soul by Darin Shock

The Beatles by Jeff Zuck

The Beatles by Jeff Zuck

Artists involved with this Post-Post-Modernism movement include Tracey Emin, Damien Hirst, Bill Viola, Shilpa Gupta, Mathew Barney, Chris Ofili, Wang Guangyi, Yukinori Yanagi, Andres Serrano, The Chapman Brothers, Félix González-Torres, Takashi Murakami, Jeff Koons, Renée Cox, David Osagie, Alexander Kosolapov, Koya Abe, Maurice Heerdink, Ruben Ortiz-Torres, Elizabeth Peyton, David LaChapelle, Sebastian Horsley, Chris Dyer and Jenny Saville.

Nuwan Sen’s Art Sense
Nuwan Sen n’ The Beatles
Nuwan Sen’s Music Sense  

One Lovely Blog Award

I’ve been nominated for the One Lovely Blog Award by the blogger who goes as, A Guy without Boxers, a nudist, named Roger, with a very picturesquely risqué blog. I was nominated early last month (3rd November 2014), when I wasn’t here in SL, but travelling Down Under. So congrats Roger, and thank you for nominating me & my blog, No Nonsense with Nuwan Sen.
One Lovely Blog AwardLike any Blog Award in general, the recipient has to meet certain requirements, and here they are :-

1. Thank the person who nominated you, and post the award Logo. DONE (above).

2. Share seven facts about yourself.

(I) I am a born film buff. My first word as a baby most probably was ‘movies’, not ‘mamma’ like normal babies.
(II) I am an artist as well (Oil Paintings mainly) where too the concepts are mostly based on Cinema. I consider myself as an artiste with an ‘e’, due to my artistic nature in general.
(III) I love to read and write. Currently reading Ben Okri’s The Age of Magic, and am constantly writing.
(IV) I am still a virgin, partially by my own choice, as I’ve never had the desire to jump into bed with just anyone, to please other people, and yet never had the luck to be with the one I want to.
(V) I was born in New Delhi, India, to Sri Lankan parents, and having studied at the British School, in Delhi; Stafford International, in Colombo; University of Delhi, in Delhi; University of Luton, in Luton, UK; College of Fine Arts, at the University of New South Wales, in Sydney, Australia; and having lived in six countries, in three continents, and travelled around those three continents; I consider myself ‘International’, a citizen of the world, I go beyond borders.
(VI) English is my first language, as I studied in English all my life, and my brain works in English. Though my mother tongue is Sinhala.
(VII) Paris is my favourite city in the world, from the cities I’ve lived in, and the Country of Switzerland as a whole, and watery city of Venice, are my two favourite places, from the places I’ve visited.
DONE

3. Nominate 15 bloggers for the award and inform them of their nomination.

Through my previous experiences, am aware that many of my bloggers don’t like to continue this chain. And it doesn’t really feel right to just nominate a few. So I shall be kind enough to bend the rules for you here, as I did once before for The Liebster Award. Thus I nominate all my fellow Bloggers, who visit my blog and wish to continue this chain.
DONE

So wish you all the best, and thank you Roger for specifically nominating me, and again sorry for the delay on working on this post.

Cheers
Nuwan Sen

Sydney Suburbs and the way back

At a Shopping Mall (L-R) Loku, Mum, Me & Pam Achchi (My Great Aunt)

Coffee At a Shopping Mall
(L-R) Loku, Mum, Me & Pam Achchi (My Great Aunt)

Continuing towards the end of our holiday in Oz.
On Thursday the 13th, initially I kept it as my day, to travel into the city (Sydney), check out the Art Exhibition ‘Pop to Popism’; featuring some works of the greatest post-modernist artists ever such as Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, David Hockney, Martin Sharp, Brett Whiteley et al, at the Art Gallery of NSW; and to meet some of my friends from (COFA, UNSW) University days who are still residing Down Under (including Aussies). I had it all planned out, with my busy old friends to meet at various times that day. Then came another good news, the day before, that Pam Achchi (my Great Aunt, my mother’s aunt, Loku’s mother), whose nursing home was under quarantine all this time (see my post Holidaying in Australia (NSW)), though not lifted, she was allowed to go out. So, as I really wanted to see her too, Loku (my mother’s first cousin), mum & I, visited her in Blacktown (a far suburb of Sydney). Thus I changed my plans to leave for the city after having lunch with Pam Achchi & co. But plans never really work out the way you want. We got delayed getting to the nursing home, and then lunch. Some of my friends had dropped out, due to other prior engagements. So ultimately I ditched the rest of my poor friends for my great aunt, as it was absurd going all the way from Blacktown to the city (which could take more than hour by train) and from the city to the Art Gallery, and then to the rest of the places. When I called them up, they were really disappointed. Only other option now left was for them to come to Airport the next afternoon. Anyway, at least we got to speak to each other on the phone. That was a good thing. Some thing’s better than nothing. We even spoke the next day, just as my flight was about to take off.

On the way to Blacktown, we came upon a DELHI ROAD (named after by birth city ;)  )

On the way to Blacktown, we came upon a DELHI ROAD (named after my birth city 😉 )

All the films (DVD) and a few books, I bought in Australia.

All the films (DVD’s) and three books, I bought in Australia.

Thus, after a quick lunch, in lieu of the city, ditching my peers, I went to a nearby shopping complex, with the trio of old ladies 😉 (pictured right at the top). As per my luck turned out, there was a DVD sale there. I had already bought a few DVD film’s in Adelaide, and later in Chatswood (a suburb in Sydney’s Northshore), but I went crazy here, and bought around 15 films. Altogether, by the time I reached SL, I had 26 DVD’s with me. It was a day well spent.

Dropping off Pam Achchi Mum with Pam Achchi, at the Nursing home.

Dropping off Pam Achchi
Mum with Pam Achchi, at the Nursing home.

After dropping off Pam Achchi at her nursing home, we went back to Loku’s home, and that evening Carlo (my father’s first cousin) picked us up, and we went to his place for dinner. T’was nice to see his Chinese wife, Chin Chin, after such a long time.

At Loku’s, in Castle Cove, same evening (L to R) Carlo, Mum & Loku

At Loku’s, in Castle Cove, same evening
(L to R) Carlo, Mum & Loku

At Carlo & Chin Chin’s Mum with Carlo, Chin Chin and their twin daughters.

At Carlo & Chin Chin’s
Mum with Carlo, Chin Chin and their twin daughters.

Next morning, 14th November, 2014, packing, and cleaning up, like crazy. Late morning, close to noon, Dennis (Loku’s husband) and I went for some last minute shopping at Westfield in Chatswood. I ended up buying a few more movies.

Dennis & Loku, with Mum; when they dropped us at the Sydney Kingsford Airport.

Dennis & Loku, with Mum; when they dropped us at the Sydney Kingsford Airport.

Thus came an end to our Australian tour. After a quick lunch, we headed to Sydney’s Kingsford Airport. On the Qantas flight from Sydney to Singapore, I finally watched Magic in the Moonlight (2014), a Woody Allen comedy.

In Transit At the Singapore Changi International Airport

In Transit
At the Singapore Changi International Airport

At the Singapore (Changi International) Airport, Duty Free, I just casually asked at a chocolate stall, whether they had any Neuhaus chocolates, and Voilà!!! they did. It’s been my favourite chocolate, since I tasted Neuhaus chocolates, in Belgium, in 2003, pushing down Ferrero Rocher, my favourite since my early teenage years, to second place. It’s been almost a decade, since I last tasted Neuhaus. I had to buy it. It didn’t last a week though. Anyway, on the Emirates flight from Singapore to Colombo, I watched The Two Faces of January (2014), a movie based on a Patricia Highsmith novel. I didn’t touch Ben Okri’s The Age of Magic during these two flights, and haven’t touched it since my flight from Adelaide to Sydney on the 8th of November (see my post Holidaying in South Australia). I ought to get back to reading Ben Okri. We reached Sri Lanka, on 15th early morning, at 1:40 am. My father came the next day. My sister and her husband on the 19th of November, 2014.

Thus ended our Australian tour.

Nuwan Sen n’ Travel
Nuwan Sen’s Travel Sense

P.S. THIS ALSO HAPPENS TO BE MY 200th POST!!!!!

Adelaide & Hahndorf

Cowboy Down Under Hahndorf, Australia

Cowboy Down Under
Hahndorf, Australia

On the 2nd of November, 2014, afternoon, I left Colombo, along with my mother, sister and brother-in-law (my sister’s husband), for a trip to Australia. We flew in a well spacious Emirates (code-share with Qantas) flight, to Singapore, and from Singapore in a congested Qantas Flight (with good enough service though) to Sydney, and from Sydney in a, comparatively better, domestic, Qantas flight to Adelaide. Thus, after almost two days of travel, we arrived in Adelaide on the evening of 3rd November, 2014. I was half dead, by the time we reached Franklin Central Apartments (where we had rented an apartment for the duration of our stay in Adelaide) in the city centre, after all I hadn’t had a wink of sleep in the three flights to Adelaide from Colombo.

It was nice to be back in Australia after 6½ years, though it was my first time in Adelaide. Back when I was living in Sydney (New South Wales), between June 2006 and June 2008, I had covered most of the Australian Eastern coast, from The Great Barrier Reef, Cape Tribulation, Cairns, Kuranda, Townsville, Magnetic Island et al up North East (Queensland), to Melbourne (Victoria) and the Great Ocean Road tour through Bells Beach, The Grotto up to see The Twelve Apostles, South East. But this was my first time in the state of South Australia. And I’ve never ventured towards the Western territory of Aussie land till date. Plus, this was also the first time I travelled down under with my family. My sister and father, had visited Australia (Sydney), back in September-October 2011, but this was the first time for my mum and my sister’s husband. And the first time for all of us in Adelaide (SA).

On the Emirates Flight I watched most of Boyhood (2014), and latter part of it in the Qantas Flight to Sydney. I mostly read Ben Okri’s The Age of Magic in the flight to Sydney, a book I bought at the Singapore (Changi International) Airport, whilst on transit. Coincidentally, it was a novel related to travel. A philosophical look at a train journey from Paris, France to Basel, in Switzerland. I couldn’t complete it though. In the third flight (Sydney to Adelaide), I tried to watch Magic in the Moonlight (2014), a Woody Allen flick, which I switched off, as I was too tired.

On 4th morning, though still a bit tired, I started to feel better, and we headed off to Hahndorf. An old German town, founded in 1838, by Captain Dirk Hahn, in the suburbs of Adelaide. Hahndorf literally means Hahn’s Town. I fell in love with the small European Town, and it’s friendly atmosphere. We walked around the streets, had a great lunch at ‘The Hahndorf Inn’. I even had some beer. Being a person who doesn’t enjoy drinking, especially alcohol, it was a pretty big deal. The last time I had any alcohol was six years ago. So it’s that rare I’d taste alcohol. I am not anti-alcohol, I just don’t enjoy drinking, I never did. Otherwise I have a sweet tooth and love desserts, and most of the ones I love have alcohol in them. Thus it’s not for any moral or religious reason that I don’t drink, but simply ‘cause I don’t like to. Beer even less so, as I generally give more preference to sophisticated liquor, like wine, cherry, champagne, and chocolate based liqueurs. But I can’t go to a German inspired habitation and expect to taste classy drinks and not taste their Beer. Otherwise, in lieu of beer, I ought to taste nothing at all. Along with the Beer we had a great pork based meat platter. The three of us really enjoyed it, and my vegetarian mother, enjoyed her Pretzel Bread appetiser.

Strawberry Fields, Hahndorf, Australia.  (L-R) My Sister, My Mum, My Sister’s  Husband.

Strawberry Fields, Hahndorf, Australia.
(L-R) My Sister, My Mum, My Sister’s Husband. PIX: Nuwan Sen

The highlights of Hahndorf, were being able to see a Museum related to Sir Hans Heysen (a German born, Australian, pastoral artist, that I wasn’t that well aware of) at the Heritage Museum & Art Gallery (which was also the information centre for the town), and of course the strawberry picking. My mum, did the most picking, and I the least 🙂 . Hey, I was busy taking pictures of the beatific strawberry fields, not that I didn’t pick any strawberries, I just picked comparatively very little, while she filled up a whole box. Of course my sister did the second best, but I doubt her husband did much picking either. I saw him ordering everyone around more and less picking. Ha!! None the less we did have fun. Next day Mum & I went to the shops, at Rundle Mall. That evening my father joined us in Adelaide. He left SL, two days after we did.

With Matthew Flinders, in Adelaide, Australia.

With Matthew Flinders, in Adelaide, Australia.

On the 6th, it was my day, my lone day. Thus the lone wolf, scavenged through Adelaide, towards ‘The Art Gallery of South Australia’. On the way I saw some interesting sculptures/statues/busts of famed people, including Mary Lee; a 19th century, Irish-Australian, social reformer and a feminist of the suffragist movement of South Australia; and Matthew Flinders (pictured above), English navigator and cartographer, the first person to circumnavigate Australia and identify it as a continent. The art gallery wasn’t that massive, and housed very little amount of works, compared to many a galleries I’ve visited in Europe, Asia and Australia itself. There were very few famed Australian artists, the likes of Grace Crowley, Sidney Nolan and Martin Sharp. But one of my favourite Australian Artists, Brett Whitely (see my post Beatle News #8 …& Brett Whiteley), was missing. Of course I’ve seen some of his works earlier, at ‘The Art Gallery of New South Wales’, in Sydney, when I use to live there (2006-2008). And I had seen a Sidney Nolan Exhibition, in early 2008, at ‘The Art Gallery of NSW’, as well. But I wished more Ozzie artists were hung at ‘The Art Gallery of South Australia’, as well. They did have some European works too, including Impressionist artist, Camille Pissarro, whose works I had seen at the Museé d’Orsay in Paris, France, when I lived there back in 2008-2009. There was also an interesting exhibition of etchings by G.B. Piranesi. Plus a post-post modernism exhibition by recent artists, using cut glass and lighting. Post the Art Gallery I checked out the ‘University of Adelaide’ and visited the ‘South Australian Museum’ briefly. All in proximity to each other. Along all these walks I met some really interesting people to talk to, which I hardly get out here. After the Museum closed I headed back to the Rundle Mall, and shopped for some books at Dymocks , and then headed to the cinema. Palace Cinema. And ended up watching Fury (2014), starring Brad Pitt and Logan Lerman. After the movie, it was late night, I walked back, met some French and German Rickshaw wallah’s. Had a nice chat with them as well. T’was a nice long day, by myself.

Cowboy in a Rickshaw With a German Rickshaw wallah

Cowboy in a Rickshaw
With a German Rickshaw wallah

On the 7th was my sisters MBA graduation ceremony (from the Australian Institute of Business), the main reason we went Down Under, in the first place. The Ceremony took place at the Adelaide Town Hall, and there was formal dinner post that at the Gallery on Waymouth. My sister did her degree in Colombo from AIB, but she had her post-graduation ceremony down there. Gallery on Waymouth was an interesting, purposely Kitsch style, Art Gallery style, café, with a Graffiti wall at the side entrance. Inside, I loved a couple of works inspired by Andy Warhol and an old Australian Matchbox cover, by an unknown artist, bringing Pop Art to the 21st century and giving it an Oz twist.

MBA Graduation Ceremony @ Adelaide Town Hall (Left to Right) Me (Nuwan Sen), My Dad, My Mum, The Post Graduate (My Baby Sister - Sachinta), The Chairman of AIB (Prof. Selva Abraham), and Sachinta's husband (Umesh).

MBA Graduation Ceremony @ Adelaide Town Hall
(Left to Right) Me (Nuwan Sen), My Dad, My Mum, The Post Graduate (My Baby Sister – Sachinta), The Chairman of AIB (Prof. Selva Abraham), and Sachinta’s husband (Umesh).

On the 8th of November, 2014, we left Adelaide for Sydney. On this Qantas flight, I was planning to check out Magic in the Moonlight (2014), which I couldn’t on the way to Adelaide. But this Qantas flight didn’t have any screens per seat. Thus I lounged back in my chair and got back into reading Ben Okri’s The Age of Magic.

Nuwan Sen n’ Travel

Break from BloggingTo my Fellow Bloggers, friends, family, and other visitors/followers/fans 🙂
I shall be taking a break from blogging, as I’ll be travelling around country for a month and half, on a work related research tour, with my new work mates. So adieu for now. I haven’t left you, keep checking, I shall be back soon.
With much love
Nuwan Sen (20th July 2014)
Flandrin Pose Digital ageArt Picture: Detail/Close-up from my drawing titled ‘That Flandrin Youth in the digital age (Bed-In)’ from last year. The sketch is based on/inspired from Jean-Hippolyte Flandrin’s famed Jeune Homme nu assis au bord de la mer a.k.a. Young Male Nude Seated beside the Sea from 1835-1836, Singer/Songwriter/Peace Activist John Lennon’s famous ‘Bed-Ins for Peace’ from 1969, and me myself (of course I do not blog in the nude, Ha!!, though aesthetically speaking, I prefer to draw the human figure in the nude).
Nuwan Sen’s Art Sense

I watched five films within the last five days, on TV5 MONDE. All French; Three feature length, two short films; One Canadian-French, four French-French Films. Here are five fast film reviews.

Nicola-Frank Vachon in and as 'Ésimésac (2012)'

Nicola-Frank Vachon in and as ‘Ésimésac (2012)’

Monday: 31/O3/2014: A Man without a Shadow, An Angel Feathering and A Smokers Detoxification.

Ésimésac (2012)
Ésimésac is a magical realism, Canadian-French, Feature Film. The story revolves around a fully grown two year old man, Ésimésac (Nicola-Frank Vachon) who resides in Saint-Élie-de-Caxton. A kind gentle man, with strength enough to pull a massive rock on his own. A man who was born without a shadow, the only reason for him to have an inferiority complex.
In this hunger stricken village, Ésimésac suggests that all get together and build a communal garden. Soon rumours are spread of a new railway stop in their village. Seeing the chance to make themselves rich, lead by the innocent Ésimésac, the village people abandon the garden and set to making cheap railway tracks instead. Only person who isn’t happy with this decision is Ésimésac’s sister. Meanwhile Ésimésac, unhappy at being shadowless, gets the village witch to help him get a shadow of an acorn. Soon that shadow starts to branch out, but at the cost of his sister turning ill and starting to feather, into an angel.
A beautiful piece of magical realism, by director Luc Picard, who also acts in the movie. 7/10

Detox (2012)
Detox is a nine minute short French-French movie, which I watched on Monday night itself, soon after Ésimésac finished. It’s about a man, an ex-smoker (played by Benoit Thiébault), going through a detoxification. While a mechanic (Fabrice Colson), smoking a cigarette, fixes the ex-smoker’s vehicle, the ex-smoker is outside, seated in a bench, under the scorching sun. He is waiting, with his brain boiling, anxious, nervous, tense, as everyone around him in the street smoke away. Will he give in, or won’t he???
Excellent and funny short flick, directed by Julien Bittner. 10/10

Detox and The Supper

Tuesday: 01/O4/2014: A Dialogue between Two Famous Individuals

Le Souper (1992), a.k.a. The Supper
Le Souper, set in France in 1815, just three weeks after Napoleon’s defeat at Waterloo. While Napoleon is in exile, on July 6, Charles-Maurice de Talleyrand (Claude Rich), a shrewd politician, invites the chief of police, a revolutionary, Joseph Fouché (Claude Brasseur) for a meal. The two sit down for a private late night dinner, as a revolt is brewing just outside their window. Their conversation ends up being a verbal duel, where they ferociously insult one another, while the political future of France is at stake.
A very enjoyable dialogue between two greatly notorious, power hungry, figures in France. At times boring, at times suspensefully intriguing. Directed by Édouard Molinaro. Based on a play by Jean-Claude Brisville. 8/10

Arthur Dupont as Manu  in 'Bus Palladium' (2010)

Arthur Dupont as Manu in ‘Bus Palladium’ (2010)

Thursday 03/O4/2014: An Eighties Rock-Group, A Blind Artist and A Naked Model

Bus Palladium (2010)
Bus Palladium (2010), is about an eighties rock group, that ends up being destroyed, when two men fall for the same woman. Arthur Dupont is excellent as Manu Pedraza, the lead singer of the group, LUST. The music is mind-blowing. I was just a kid growing up in the 80’s, and the music had a very nostalgic feel. Added to their own music, there were a few famed English background songs from the 70’s as well.
Enjoyable movie, with not necessarily a great story. It wouldn’t have been so good if not for the music. Directed by British born Christopher Thompson. 8/10

Argile (2012), a.k.a. Clay
Argile is the second short film I watched this week. It was shown soon after Bus Palladium, yesterday evening itself. An eighteen minute short film. We see an old woman (Edith Scob) sculpting a figure out of clay. A young male nude model, Alex (Laurent Delbecque) poses. The old woman is blind, thus she has to feel his body with her wrinkled soft hands. Soon it’s not her art that satisfies her hunger.
A aesthetically nice little erotic film, minus any actual nudity or sex. It’s only his shoulders and chest she touches with her clay stained hands, the rest is left to the imagination. A beautifully done, excellent, short film. 10/10

Laurent Delbecque as Alex in 'Argile' (2012), a.k.a. 'Clay'

Laurent Delbecque as Alex in ‘Argile’ (2012), a.k.a. ‘Clay’

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense

Untitled

Last night I watched Le Procès (1962), a.k.a. The Trial, on TV5MONDE. A European (esp. French) production made in the English language. Ironically, the version I watched, was dubbed into French, with English subtitles.
The Trial
A cinematically surreal piece of brilliance, cinematography wise, set design wise, and conceptual wise. Yet the movie does falter at places, insignificant to prod on.
The Trial (62') scene
The movie starts with a ‘Pinscreen’ animation, telling us about a man who is permanently detained from seeking access to the Law, used as an introductory allegory of what is to befall our hero later on in the film.
We see a common man, Josef K (Anthony Perkins), representing the ordinary middle class young male of modern society (early 1960’s), who is woken up one morning by an unidentified man, whom we assume represents the police/the law, telling Mr. K that he is under open arrest. Thus we follow Mr. K who goes to work, tries desperately to find out what he is charged with, tries to prove his innocence, and makes out with the three female love interests. Resulting in a beautiful surreal journey through law & order and blinded justice, equated to heaven and hell. The outside world heavenly, and inside the law – hell!!! Where everyone, acquainted to the protagonist or not, keeps telling him he’s guilty of an unmentioned crime. While he maintains his innocence, adding that he is just an easy target for the law, like any common man. The film is more philosophical, than realistic, yet almost moves in real time. Through his journey from day to night to day, in the same three piece suit, we meet his next door neighbour, Marika Burstner (Jeanne Moreau); a dancer, with whom he has his first make out session; his advocate, Maître Albert Hastler (played by the director of this fascinating film itself, Orson Welles), and Hastler’s nurse/mistress Leni (Romy Schneider); the supporting lead female character of the film, with whom he has his next make out session, and who tries to genuinely help him. Soon we learn that he is actually condemned to death, and he is “guilty until proven innocent”, ironically the exact opposite of what the law should upheld.
Without giving away the ending, the movie ends on the eve of Josef K’s 31st Birthday.
Orson Welles with cast members on the set of 'The Trial'
It’s definitely worth checking out, though not a great movie. Of course film director, Orson Welles, supposedly mentioned after making this movie that, “The Trial is the best film I have ever made.” In one scene of the movie, Welles’ character Hastler mentions that he “doesn’t understand”, a hilarious pun, adding to the confusion of the audience, if the director can’t understand what’s happening to the protagonist, how is audience to do so.
It is visually and philosophically spectacular, could bore down at a few places though. Worth more if you specifically love surreal cinema and for any film buff.
Very Good 8/10
LE PROCÈS
The film is based on the 1914 German novel, Der Prozess by Franz Kafka. A book I haven’t read yet, but after watching this film am really keen on doing so. Le Procès (1962) is a modern adaptation, which introduces the audience to computer technology of the time, also called the Electronic Brain.

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense

Audrey Hepburn makes cake for 'No Nonsense with Nuwan Sen' - 2nd Birthday

Audrey Hepburn makes cake for ‘No Nonsense with Nuwan Sen’ – 2nd Birthday

Can’t believe how fast time flies. It’s already been two years, since I started my blog on 20th March 2012.
I’ve blogged about various stuff; including art, cinema, literature, history and science; giving priority to cinema.
When I started this blog, I didn’t expect many followers, for I write about what I love. Yet, rarely do I write anything personal.
Today, I have 118 followers, close to 300 comments, and about a zillion likes. This is my 135th post.

Thanks a ton to my fellow bloggers and other followers for their continuing support, through their encouraging comments and likes, which helps me keep this blog going.

Cheers
Nuwan Sen
Bookish Nuwan
Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense

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