Tag Archive: Hitchcock


Three more nominations (June 2015)
I’ve been nominated yet again, within this month itself, for three Blog Awards; again!!! This time by one Blogger, Akhiz Munawar. An interesting, deeply thoughtful, Blog, of poetry & prose. Literature buffs would love it, especially if you are into poetry.

The Versatile Blogger Award

Versatile Blogger award (2015)

Real Neat Blog Award

 Neat Blog– and –

Beautiful Bloggers Award

Beautiful Bloggers Award
Thank you Akhiz Munawar for complimenting my Blog(& me), with a triple nomination.

This is my 2nd Versatile Blogger Award (different logo though) and Beautiful Bloggers Award (which I nominated Akhiz for, 10 days ago, and now he’s re-nominated me for it). And my 1st Real Neat Blog Award.

So here are the instructions (as most of you, my blog-pals, are already aware of)

*Thank the person who nominated me, and add the pictures of the awards above. (DONE)

*Answer the 7 questions prepared by Akhiz Munawar, for me.

Q°1. What’s your Favourite Genre of Music ?
A°1.  All sorts. From Classical (Piano, Sitar, Violin, Flute et al), to Pop, Rock, Country, Jazz, Disco, to New-age, to Fusion, Opera even (Opera not to the extent of others, as I wouldn’t really sit in relaxation listening to it, but I do enjoy watching an Opera on stage, the performance along with the Operatic music; or even in film, with an Operatic background score). Am generally not a fan of Rap and Hip Hop (there are few exceptions of course).

Q°2. Name of your Favourite author, your favourite book?
A°2. Within the last five years, I’ve been in love with Christopher Isherwood novels (am reading one at the moment). But it use to be Agatha Christie for a long time. My all time favourite novel happens to be, City of Joy by Dominique Lapierre (English Language version), which I read 20 years ago. And that’s the only published work of Dominique Lapierre I’ve read till date.

Q°3. What’s your favourite TV show ?
A°3. Currently nothing specific, but from more recently, within the first five months of Year 2015 (January to May), I’d say, Downton Abbey (2010 – 2015) & The Newsroom (2012 – 2014).

Q°4. What advice would you like to give yourself if you get a chance to travel; 10 years back in time?
A°4. Am drawing a Blank!!! Can’t think of anything that I haven’t already tried, and failed (unfortunately), that could make my life any better today.

Q°5. Again if you are given a time machine to see and visit the wonders of these civilization at their prime where will you go?
a. The Egyptian Civilization
b. The Mayan Civilization
c. The Mohenjodaro (Indus valley) Civilization
d. The Middle Ages (Europe and central Asia)
e. The Mughal Empire
f. Jurassic Period
A°5. Oh! I’d love to visit them all, but I’d most probably change the order, to my preference, beginning with….
(i) The Egyptian Civilization
(ii) The Middle Ages (Europe & Central Asia)
(iii) The Mughal Empire
(iv) The Mayan Civilization
(v) The Mohenjo-Daro (Indus valley) Civilization
……………..and, last but not the least,
(vi) Jurassic Period, or ‘Jurassic Park’ will do!!!

Q°6. Your Favourite Quote?
A°6. I have so many, but since my blog is primarily a Film Blog, I’ll go with a section (last line) of the famed cinematic quote, by my all time favourite Film Director, that I used, atop my introduction, for my final dissertation, Marriage in Hitchcock Films: From Rebecca to Marnie, for my MA in International Cinema, at the University of Luton (2002-2003), in Luton, UK.

‘‘ What is drama, but life with the dull bits cut out’’
– Alfred Hitchcock

Q°7. What are your thoughts on Coffee?
A°7. Love it – with a creamy soft blend (By the way I know what you mean by coffee 😉 – of course I haven’t made my coffee yet!!!)
(DONE)

*Nominate 7 Bloggers for all three awards pictured above.

1. Alex of Alex Raphael
2. Reut Ziri of Sweet Archive
3. Paul S of Pfeiffer Pfilms and Meg Movies (for Real Neat Blog Award)
4. Jonathan & Aaron Ferrara of Husband & Husband (for The Versatile Blogger Award & Real Neat Blog Award)
5. Robert of Righteous Cinema (for The Versatile Blogger Award & Real Neat Blog Award)
6. Vinnieh of Vinnieh (for Real Neat Blog Award & Beautiful Bloggers Award)
7. Ruth of Silver Screenings (for Real Neat Blog Award)
(DONE)

*List 10 questions for my nominees

Q°1. Which city/town, that you’ve lived in, is your favourite ?
Q°2. Which continent, that you’ve never travelled to, would you like to visit the most? Any specific country/countries?
Q°3. What’s your favourite English language novel, written by a non-British/American/Australian born author?
Q°4. What’s your favourite non-English language novel, translated into English?
Q°5. What’s your favourite non-fiction book?
Q°6. If Hitchcock were alive today, which Hitchcockian classic, would you like him to re-make, with the availability of  modern day technical wizardry, that didn’t exist back then?
Q°7. Who would you like, to be the new Hitchcockian blonde, from the 21st century, working in this new project of his?
Q°8. Which is your favourite decade, from the previous century? Which is your favourite decade in film, from the previous century?
Q°9. What 21st century film, set in the decade from 20th century that you love, is your favourite?
Q°10. From films made in the 21st century, within the last 15 years (rather 14½ years, ‘cause we are still in the  middle of 2015), which non-English language film, from which country, is your favourite?
(DONE)

Thanks again Akhiz Munawar for honouring my Blog, with a triple nomination.

*Special Note: As I stated, back in January 2014; after working on 8 nominations, within one month; kindly refrain from nominating me for any more Blog awards. At least for a while.

Thanking you
Nuwan Sen
(No Nonsense with Nuwan Sen)

Last night I dreamt of the Ocean, with it’s fierce waves splashing against the humongous rocks, in the coastal county of Cornwall (with apologies to Daphne du Maurier).

Joan Fontaine & Laurence Olivier

Joan Fontaine & Laurence Olivier

Rebecca synopsis
Rebecca is dead, and we never see her throughout the movie/book. Yet, the essence of her presence, is felt throughout.

A widower, Maxim de Winter (Laurence Olivier) meets a naïve, nameless, paid companion (Joan Fontaine), to a rich socialite, Mrs. Van Hopper (Florence Bates), in Monte Carlo, Monaco, and the two get hitched.

Once their honeymoon comes to end, so does their stress free, romantic, happy life together, when they reach Manderley; de Winter’s ancestral home, in Cornwall. The spirit of his first/late wife is alive within every inch of the mansion, every brick and stone, and the household staff. Especially through the eerie Mrs. Danvers (Judith Anderson), the housekeeper.

Plus Rebecca’s death is submerged with a mysterious undertone.

One of the most interesting thing to note, about this story, a novel written by Daphne du Maurier, and adapted to the big screen by Alfred Hitchcock, is the fact that, the character of Rebecca, is non-existent, and the existing character of the second Mrs. De Winter (played by Fontaine), has no first name, and no née name (prior to marrying Maxim de Winter).
Rebecca Beach 3The Beach, the Ocean and the vast Seascape
The beach in the movie, is showcased as, being both, beautiful and frightening. Aesthetic and ferocious. Soothing and haunting.
Rebecca Beach 1The film begins, as does the novel, with the famous du Maurier line, “Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again”, which is now in ruins. And then the film flashes back, and we are in the French Riviera, with the sea waters beating up on the rocks, where a middle-aged man is standing on the edge of a cliff, staring, with lost look on his face, down at the ocean below, as if ready to jump. And a young woman, at once shouts, “Don’t!! Stop!!”. This is the first encounter of Mr. de Winter, and his future/second wife. So the couple’s first meeting itself is at a Beach resort, in Monaco. Soon the two start enjoying each other’s company, travelling around the beautiful costal stretch, of the Côte d’Azur. Yet, there are times he seems lost, especially when he speaks of Manderley. Once, she tries to change the subject, by speaking how warm and lovely the waters in the French Riviera are, and that in England it’s hard to imagine going for a swim, until June. Then, she mentions a man drowned once, unaware that Rebecca, Maxim de Winter’s first wife, supposedly was killed in a drowning accident, whilst sailing; which obviously only further agitates Mr. de Winter. In the beginning of the movie itself, we see how the sea is represented positively, as beautiful, breathtaking, scenic, warm and inviting; yet also in a negative light, associated with death, drowning and destruction.
Rebecca Beach 4After a quick civil marriage at the registrar’s office, we see them in Cornwall, post honeymoon, venturing towards Manderley. The young new Mrs. de Winter suddenly gets a chill, as if of impending doom. Once they enter the stone edifice/mansion, there is feeling of something very bleak and unpleasant within, and the entrance of the stoic housekeeper, Mrs. Danvers, has the young bride’s nerves on edge.

The newly married couple’s room is on the East Wing, that has never been used before, and has no view of the ocean. Whilst Maxim & Rebecca’s room, use to be in West Wing, with a view of ocean, and which, with it’s massive windows and ornately carved doors, happens to be the most beautiful room in the house. From here onwards Manderley’s beach is represented in an eerie, foreboding, manner. Cold and damp. A stark contrast to the warmth and pleasantness of the sunshine stretch of the classy French Riviera. But we do see hints, of the statuesque, elegance and beauty, of what Manderley once stood for. And the second Mrs. De Winter, tries her best to bring back those glory days, back to, the life of the very respectable, Maxim de Winter, and his beloved Manderley.

The scene where the newly weds go for a walk in the estate of Manderley; just after the visit of Beatrice (Gladys Cooper), Maxim de Winter’s sister, and her husband, Major Giles Lacy (Nigel Bruce); a stairway to the beach below is shown, and we see that Mr. de Winter is afraid of something. He doesn’t want to descend downwards (not just literally, but also neither does he want to lose his status and honour; thus his attachment to Manderley, despite everything; nor bring back his haunting memories, associated with this particular beach). Their dog, Jasper, gets loose, and the new wife runs behind it, and comes across an isolated and neglected cottage, which has gone to wreck and ruin. She meets Ben (Leonard Carey) a crazy man who keeps repeating, “she ain’t comin’ back is she”. An obvious reference to the disappearance/death of Rebecca. Maxim de Winter’s reluctance to come to the beach, his new wife’s meeting with Ben, and de Winter’s angry reproach, afterwards, towards his young wife, for going into the cottage; all accounts to the fact, there is something mysterious and secretive, in relation to this private beach of theirs.

The West Wing: The most beautiful room in Manderley

The West Wing: The most beautiful room in Manderley

Almost soon after this incident, the scene involving the West Wing, is again in relation to the sea. The room in which once Rebecca slept, with an admiringly cruel undercurrent, is showcased by Mrs. Danvers, to the new Mrs. De Winter. As if in a trance, Mrs. Danvers tells the new bride, to just listen to the sea, and how soothing it is. Just then a ferocious wave splashes onto a rock, echoing a loud roar of pain and power. Yet, this manipulation on the vulnerable second Mrs. de Winter, backfires, and we see her gain strength momentarily, and get rid of all of Rebecca’s belongings, in the morning room, stating, “I’m Mrs. de Winter now.”

This is the first instance, we see, of her coming out of her shell of fear. Yet, the conniving Mrs. Danvers reciprocates, by conning her into dressing up in a mid-19th century ballroom dress, worn by an ancestor of de Winter, for the upcoming costume ball. Unfortunately, Rebecca had worn the exact same dress, for the costume ball held, the year before. Which only agitates Mr. de Winter, and shock some of the already present guests. We hear Beatrice gasp, uttering the words, “Rebecca”, in horror.

Now comes the most interesting sequence. The twist in the tale. The shocking climax. The foggy morning, the sea finally reveals, all the secrets of the de Winter household. The night of the costume ball, when second Mrs. de Winter, confronts Mrs. Danvers, about the outfit; and as Mrs. Danvers tries to, hypnotically, get the new bride to commit suicide, by jumping off the windowsill in Rebecca’s room, in the west wing; suddenly fireworks flare up, awakening them, as if from a trance. A diver had discovered the wreck of Rebecca’s sailboat, resting below on the ocean bed. But what’s worse is, Rebecca’s body too, was discovered inside the boat. Then who was the woman, Maxim de Winter identified as being Rebecca’s dead body, washed ashore, the night she went missing?

Joan Fontaine & Judith Anderson in a scene from Rebecca (1940)

Joan Fontaine & Judith Anderson in a scene from Rebecca (1940)

The day of revelation, the day of reckoning, is finally here. The day after the costume ball dilemma. It’s early in the morning, it’s still very dark. Through the fog blanketed strip of the private Manderley beach; that Maxim de Winter, early on feared to tread on; the new Mrs. de Winter, goes looking for her husband. She meets Frank Crawley (Reginald Denny); loyal friend of her husband’s, and her confidant; on the way. He let’s her know about the discovery of the boat. She ultimately finds the ever brooding, Maxim de Winter, in a state of despair, in the neglected cottage, where she first met Ben. Here he reveals to her what really happened the night Rebecca was killed.

This is one of the most interesting sequences, in the whole movie. As Maxim de Winter, sums up the happenings of the night Rebecca died, to his second wife; there is no flashback scenes, no ghostly figure hanging around, no windows/doors, shutting/opening abruptly, no glass breaking, nothing. The camera pans the room; from the sofa, and the coffee table, with an ash tray filled with cigarette butts, towards the door, where Mr. de Winter is standing, re-capping the events of that ill-fated night; and we, the audience, imagine Rebecca in the room. It must take a genius like Alfred Hitchcock to make that possible.

Here we, along with Joan Fontaine’s character, find out that Rebecca, wasn’t a nice person, as everyone believed she was. In fact, she flirted and seduced, everyone around her. She wasn’t a faithful wife. And this cottage was her hideout, where she brought her lovers. She fooled everyone. And that particular night, she had conned Maxim de Winter, into believing she was pregnant, with the child of her wayward cousin, Jack Favell (George Sanders).

Though mostly faithful to the novel, this is one of the major areas in plot, that the movie, Rebecca, differs to that of the book, Rebecca, due to silly censorship rules, Hays Code, of the time, under William H. Hays. But despite that setback, Hays couldn’t ruin the movie, and in fact, Hitchcock’s Rebecca ended up being a masterpiece. I want give away the main difference in plot here. Most of you film, and literature, buffs would already know. But those who don’t. Read the Book. Watch the Movie.

The movie, then lets us know, how Mr. de Winter, carried the dead body of Rebecca, placed it inside the boat, drilled holes, opened up the seacock’s, and sent it to sink in the middle of the ocean, never too be found. Until, unfortunately, a diver accidentally did. But the recovery of the boat and the body, weren’t exactly a bad thing. For the lead characters discover a whole lot of other truths. Like the fact that Rebecca wasn’t pregnant at all, it was something else altogether. The new wife, who’s been living under the shadow, of the dead wife, suddenly matures and finds strength, and is able to support her husband. Specially now that she knows, that Maxim never loved Rebecca, she’s not afraid anymore. When there are no more secrets between the couple, their bond strengthens. It’s still a very tragic movie. Mrs. Danvers can’t handle the truth, or rather what she is made to believe to be true, and takes it upon herself, to make sure, the newer couple could never lead a happy life in Manderley.
Rebecca towards the endJust like the oceans ferocious waves, the roaring fires engulfing the beautiful mansion of Manderley; with the figure of Mrs. Danvers in the west wing, and the burning monogrammed ‘R’ (for Rebecca), on the silky satin négligée case; are beautifully captured. There is some excellent cinematography here, especially the way the beautiful interiors, of Manderley, are filmed. A masterwork of cinema, by a mastermind of aesthetics, suspense and intrigue.

Facts relating to Rebecca
Released in 1940, Rebecca was altogether nominated for 11 Oscars at the 13th Academy Awards held in February 1941, and won 2 Oscars. One for ‘Best Picture’ (back then known as ‘Outstanding Production’) and one for ‘Best Cinematography’ to George Barnes. This was the 1st and only win, for a Hitchcock film, and for American cinematographer, George Barnes. The Oscar ceremony of 1941, was the very first time, that the winners names remained a secret, until they were announced, just before they received the prestigious trophy. Filmed in Black & White, when Hollywood was going through a newly discovered obsession with colour, Rebecca, which was Alfred Hitchcock’s very first American film, is considered one of the Best Films, within the 120 year old history of Cinema. Plus, the character of ‘Mrs Danvers’ (played by Judith Anderson), is known as one of the best villainous roles ever. Rebecca is one of the rare movies, which has an interesting blend of varied genres, that explores, film noir, romance, mystery, psychological thriller, Gothic literary horror, incest, adultery, crime and drama. Yet, despite all those ingredients, it’s a movie, made in such a way, that’s it’s suitable for all ages.

Pure Excellence!!!!! Pure Cinema!!!!!

I wrote this post for the Beach Party Blogathon, organised by Ruth of Silver Screenings and Kristina of Speakeasy.

Hitchcock’s Rebecca (1940), considered the best adaptation of Daphne du Maurier’s famed 1938 novel, happens to be my favourite movie adaptation of a novel, that I have read. Hitchcock is superb in creating atmospheric dread, and none the better, as he does here. Especially using the natural elements, such as the vast ocean. Rebecca is among my Top-5 all time favourite movies ever.

Beach Party Blogathon (June 2015)
Beach party for RebeccaThank you Ruth and Kristina, for letting me be part of this interesting Blogathon. Thoroughly enjoyed it.

Cheers
Nuwan Sen

A Trio of Nominations
I’ve been nominated, by three different Bloggers, for a trio of Blog Awards.
Liebster award 2015Liebster Award by Vinnieh of Vinnieh on 20th May 2015
(A superb film blogger, and one of the earliest bloggers to locate my blog)
Most dragons loyalty awardDragon’s Loyalty Award by Reut Ziri of Sweet Archive on  29th May 2015
(A music and cinema blogger, whose blog I stumbled upon quite recently)
Beautiful Bloggers AwardBeautiful Blog Award by Jonathan & Aaron Ferrara of Husband & Husband on 4th June 2015
(A couple of published authors, who also happen to be a lovely young married couple as well)

So thank you Vinnieh, Reut, Jonathan & Aaron for considering me worthy of the recognition you’ve awarded me, or rather, and especially, my Blog. And am truly sorry for the delay.

This is my 2nd Liebster Award (different logo though) and Dragon Loyalty Award (see my previous s), and my very 1st Beautiful Blog Award.

So here’s the usual drill (as many of you, my fellow bloggers, would already know)

*Thank the people who nominated me, and add the pictures of the awards above. (DONE)

*Answer the eight questions prepared by Vinnieh, for me, for the Liebster Award

Vinnieh’s Q1. What made you decide to start writing a blog?
Nuwan Sen’s A1. I needed a platform, to place my film critiques, without anyone ruining my articles. So that I can publish them, in their original state, as written by me.

VQ2. A night out with friends or a movie night in?
NSA2. A night out with friends, watching a movie on the Big Screen; and then discussing and analysing it at length. But haven’t done that for ages.

VQ3. Buffy or Charmed?
NSA3. Neither

VQ4. What is favourite item of clothing?
NSA4. Straight/tight fit, Blue Jeans, that have never gone out of style since the 1800’s (for casual wear), with a loose simple T-shirt, or tucked in fitting shirt. Formal wear: I love the Indian Kurta, combined with the western formal trouser, with dress socks & sleek shoes.

VQ5. Who is your favourite actress if you had to choose just one?
NSA5. Audrey Hepburn, Of Course!!!!!

VQ6. How do you follow news around the world?
NSA6. On the net, television news, and foreign newspapers and magazines, when available.

VQ7. What is the most disturbing film you have ever seen?
NSA7. Rosemary’s Baby (1968) I think. It’s an excellent psychological horror movie, by veteran film director, Roman Polanski. I highly recommend it.

VQ8. Are you get up and go person or someone who needs to be motivated?
NSA8. Get up and go person (in the rest of the world) & someone who needs to be motivated (in lazy lethargic lanka).
(DONE)

*List 7 Random thing about myself for the Dragon Loyalty and Beautiful Blog, Awards

About Me
1. The best thing that happened to my life is  (a.k.a. Gingy). She’s my little pet (literally), a puppy I adopted on the 7th of December, 2014, exactly half a year ago, today (See & follow her Facebook Page, Gingerella Sen, if you are a dog/animal lover).

Last Night: Gingerella (a.k.a. Gingy) enjoying some of my Audrey Hepburn films, from my collection. In my Room - On my Bed

Last Night: Gingerella (a.k.a. Gingy) enjoying some of my Audrey Hepburn films, from my collection.
In my Room – On my Bed

2. I have never been on a date, till date. Been out with friends, both male and female, on a one on one basis (lunch/dinner/movie/other outings), but never on a date.

3. I believe in Equal Rights. Am a Gentleman to a Lady, and a bitch to bitch. Well actually I tend to have a lot of patience, but there is always a limit to everything and anything.

4. I practice my own version of the cliché, “Forgive & Forget ”. I prefer to forgive, and forget they ever existed.

5. I wish no one any harm. About people that make me unhappy, I wish them all the best, but hope that they just stay the fuck away from my life.

6. I love the city and country of my birth (New Delhi, India); but dislike the country of my unfortunate roots (Sri Lanka), that has given me nothing but misery (and where I happen to live now, unfortunately).

7. Ps is the most beautiful concrete jungle, I have ever lived in, till date.

8. I have lived in six countries, in three continents. I consider myself international, a citizen of the world, going beyond borders. I belong to any country, that accepts me as one of their own.
(DONE)

*Nominate 10 Bloggers for all three awards pictured above.

1. Ruth of Silver Screenings
2. Jim Turnbull of The Good, the Bad and the Average
3. Robert of Righteous Cinema
4. Kristina of Speakeasy
5. Paul S of Pfeiffer Pfilms and Meg Movies
6. Jackson of Movie Man Jackson
7. Akhiz of Akhiz Munawar
8. Roger of A Guy without Boxers
9. Coolsville of Coolsville
10. The Critic Man of Thy Criticman
(DONE)

*List 10 questions for my nominees

Nuwan Sen’s Q1. What’s your favourite novel?
NSQ2. What’s your favourite movie?
NSQ3. What’s your favourite movie, based on a novel, you have read?
NSQ4. What’s your favourite movie, based on a novel, you have not read?
NSQ5. British Hitchcock or Hollywood Hitchcock?
NSQ6. Non-American born Hollywood stars or American born Hollywood stars?
NSQ7. Which famous personality, did you idolise as a child, and whom do you idolise now, as an adult?
NSQ8. Which film starring Audrey Hepburn is your favourite? And which film role of hers, do you admire the most?
NSQ9. Who is your all time favourite film director?
NSQ10. What’s you favourite Oscar moment?
(DONE)

A Big Thank You, once again, for Vinnieh, Reut, Jonathan & Aaron, for honouring my Blog, No Nonsense with Nuwan Sen, with these award nominations.

Kind Regards
Nuwan Sen
()

Finally here they are, the correct answers to the Hitchcock quiz from March 2015 (Question Time # 008: HITCHCOCK !!!!!)

A.1 1940 Film

Joan Fontaine, Laurence Olivier, Gladys Cooper & Reginald Denny in a scene from Rebecca (1940)

L to R: Joan Fontaine, Laurence Olivier, Gladys Cooper & Reginald Denny in a scene from Rebecca (1940)

(i) The still is from Rebecca (1940), based on the 1938 novel, Rebecca, by Daphne du Maurier.
(ii) The correct statements are:-
(e) This was Hitchcock’s first Oscar nomination, for ‘Best Director’.
(h) This was Hitchcock’s first Hollywood movie.
(j) This was Hitchcock’s first Oscar winning film, for ‘Best Picture’.
(iii) Joan Fontaine plays the nameless character in the movie. Judith Anderson plays the icy ‘Mrs. Danvers’, to eerie perfection.
(iv) It was Sir Laurence Olivier, who received a knighthood, in 1947.
(v) Joan Fontaine was born in Japan, on 22nd October 1917. She passed away on the 15th of December, 2013, aged 96 (see my post Happy 96th Birthday: Joan Fontaine from 22nd October 2013).

A.2 Film 46’
(i) Notorious (1946), contains the longest kiss, and one of the most romantic kisses ever (of 2½ minutes), between Cary Grant & Ingrid Bergman, in history of cinema.
(ii) It’s Ingrid Bergman, as ‘Alicia Huberman’, who is used as a modern day Mata Hari, by the Americans.
(iii) It is Alicia Huberman (Bergman), who is slowly poisoned daily, in small doses, through her coffee, by her husband, Alex Sebastian (played by Claude Rains), and her mother-in-law, Madame Anna Sebastian (played by Leopoldine Konstantin). The slow poisoning act, through coffee, is Madame Anna Sebastian’s brainchild.

A.3 British Original & Hollywood Remake

Left: The original (Black & White) British film from 1934. Right: The Hollywood colour remake from 1956.

Left: The original (Black & White) British film from 1934.
Right: The Hollywood colour remake from 1956.

(i) The movies pictured above are both named The Man Who Knew Too Much. The original British film is from 1934, and the Hollywood remake from 1956.
(ii) The song Que Sera Sera, appeared in the 1956 version, and was sung by Doris Day.
(iii) Yes, Que Sera Sera won the Oscar for ‘Best Song’  in 1957.
(iv) In the 1934 version, the family are on vacation, in Switzerland. No, in the Hollywood re-make the family holiday is set in Morocco.
(v) The gender of the child that gets kidnapped is :-
(a) Female in the 1934 movie
(b) Male in the 1956 film

A.4 Young Alfred Hitchcock & the Silent era

Young Hitchcock(i) The young girl standing behind Hitchcock in the picture is Alma Reville, his wife and collaborator. As the saying goes, “Behind every successful man there is a Woman (telling him he’s  wrong 🙂 )”.
(ii) The Pleasure Garden (1925), was the very first, completed, feature film, made by Alfred Hitchcock.
(iii) Mr. & Mrs. Smith (1941) was the only light-hearted Romantic/Screwball comedy, Hitchcock made in America.
(iv) The Short Night, should have been Alfred Hitchcock’s last film, but the project was cancelled in 1979, due to his ill health. The film never got beyond the early pre-production stage.

A.5 Colour & Hitchcoerotism

Rope Lovers:  John Dall and Farley Granger

Rope Lovers: John Dall and Farley Granger

(i) Rope (1948). Yes, it was Hitchcock’s first film in colour.
(ii) Rope is loosely based on the notorious ‘Leopold and Loeb’ case of 1924. Nathan Leopold Jr. and Richard Albert Loeb, two wealthy students at the University of Chicago, kidnapped and murdered a 14 year old boy, Robert (Bobby) Franks, in 1924. The duo killed young Bobby, to prove their intellectual superiority.

A.6 Hitchcock & the surrealist artist

Nuwan Sen’s ART Sense  Nuwan Sen’s NOIR Sense

Nuwan Sen’s ART Sense
Nuwan Sen’s NOIR Sense

(i) This famous surreal dream sequence is from Spellbound (1945), and surrealist artist, Salvador Dalí, was responsible for this beautiful creation. Of course the original dream sequence was about 20 minutes long, but being too lengthy, it was cut during editing, and only 2 minutes appear in the final film. I’d love to see the original footage, of 20 minutes. It could be a short film in itself.
(ii) Gregory Peck and Ingrid Bergman star as two psychoanalysts. It is Gregory Peck’s character, who suffers from a phobia.

A.7 Hitchcock 007
(i) Sean Connery stars, as the male lead, in Hitchcock’s Marnie (1964).
(ii) Sean Connery appeared in Marnie, after the release of the first two films from the James Bond franchise, Dr. No (1962) and From Russia with Love (1963).

A.8 Hitchcockian Train Journey’s

TOP: Dame May Whitty, Margaret Lockwood & Michael Redgrave in the 1938 noir classic. BELOW: Farley Granger & Robert Walker in the 1951 Highsmith adaptation.

TOP: Dame May Whitty, Margaret Lockwood & Michael Redgrave in the 1938 noir classic.
BELOW: Farley Granger & Robert Walker in the 1951 Highsmith adaptation.

(i) & (ii) The stills are from, the British film, The Lady Vanishes (1938), and the Hollywood classic, Strangers on a Train (1951).
(iii) Strangers on a Train was based on a novel by Patricia Highsmith.

A.9 Rebecca (1940). Why? See my critiques under lists No Name (20th October 2011), Joan Fontaine (1940 & the 40’s) ‘TOP FIVE’ (April 2012) and Why I love …. (November/December 2012) on IMDB.
Hitch Rebecca
A.10 Psycho (1960)

Two months too late. Sorry for the delay, for a lot has happened since I did the questionnaire, thus didn’t have time to work on it. So today, I practically took part in the quiz myself.
Thank you fellow Bloggers, for giving up your valuable time, to take part in this quiz, related to my all time favourite director.

Nuwan Sen n’ Film Noir
Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense
Nuwan Sen’s Hitchcockian Sense

Alfred Hitchcock, known as the master of suspense, was one of the greatest film directors ever. He started his career during the silent era, and completed it towards the end of the hippie era, even working, close to his demise. From Silent movies to talkies, from British films to Hollywood, from eerie love stories to crime, from classy film noir to B-movie horror, he’s done it all (Sometimes even blending all the genres into one). Nobody can dispute the fact he was a true genius, and one of the most talented and versatile (yet unique) personalities to have ever existed. And no doubt, nobody can call themselves a true film buff, if they lack Hitchcockian knowledge.

So here is my Hitchcockian Questionnaire. Play along and enjoy.

Q.1 1940 Film

Laurence Olivier, Joan Fontaine & Reginald Denny from this haunting classic from 1940.

Laurence Olivier, Joan Fontaine & Reginald Denny in a scene from this haunting classic from 1940.

(i) From which film; and based on which novel, by which author; is the above still from?

(ii) This was a ‘First’, in more than one category, for Alfred Hitchcock. Which three lines from below are correct :-

(a) This was Hitchcock’ s first Silent Movie.
(b) This was Hitchcock’s first Talkie.
(c) This was Hitchcock’s first Musical.
(d) This was Hitchcock’s first British film.
(e) This was Hitchcock’s first Oscar nomination, for ‘Best Director’.
(f) This was Hitchcock’s first film as an actor.
(g) This was Hitchcock’s first Bollywood movie.
(h) This was Hitchcock’s first Hollywood movie.
(i) This was Hitchcock’s first directorial venture.
(j) This was Hitchcock’s first Oscar winning film, for ‘Best Picture’.

*Remember, only three, of the above ten, statements, is correct.

(iii) Which one, of the three actors, pictured in the still, plays a nameless character, in this movie? Who plays the icy ‘Mrs. Danvers’ (not pictured)?

(iv) Which actor, from the still, was given a knighthood, in 1947?

(v) Which actor, from the trio pictured, was born in Japan, and died on 15th of December, 2013, aged 96?

Q.2 Film 46’

Cary Grant & Ingrid Bergman's 2½ minute kiss.

Cary Grant & Ingrid Bergman’s 2½ minute kiss.

(i) Which Hitchcockian film, pictured above, contains the longest notorious kiss (2½ minutes), in history of cinema? (HINT: Clue in the question itself)

(ii) Which of the two actors, in the picture above, plays a modern day, post World War – II, Mata Hari?

(iii) Which one, of the two characters shown, is slowly poisoned, through his/her coffee, daily, in the film, and by whom?

Q.3 British Original & Hollywood Remake

Peter Lorre (in the 1934 British Original),  Doris Day & James Stewart (in the 1956 Hollywood Re-make)

Peter Lorre (in the 1934 British Original), Doris Day & James Stewart (in the 1956 Hollywood Re-make)

(i) What’s the title of the two movies (pictured here), which was originally made by Hitchcock in the United Kingdom, and released in 1934; and later re-made by Hitchcock again, in the United States, and released in 1956.

(ii) Which film version, 1934 or 1956, was the song Que Sera Sera from?

(iii) Did the Doris Day song, from the 1956 version, win the Oscar for ‘Best Song’  in 1957?

(iv) In which country, are the family on vacation, in the 1934 film? Is the family holiday, in the Hollywood re-make, set in the same country as well?

(v) What’s the gender of the child that gets kidnapped in the :-
(a) 1934 version
(b) 1956 version

Q.4 Young Alfred Hitchcock & the Silent era
Young Hitchcock(i) Who is the young girl standing behind Hitchcock, in this picture? What is her relationship to him?

(ii) What was the very first, completed, feature film, made by Alfred Hitchcock, and which year was it released?

(iii) Hitchcock made only one light-hearted Romantic/Screwball comedy in America, what was it called?

(iv) What’s the name of the film that would have been the last film release of Alfred Hitchcock, but was cancelled in 1979, due to his ill health?

Q.5 Colour & Hitchcoerotism

Farley Granger & John Dall play partners in life & crime, in this homoerotic 1948 classic.

Farley Granger & John Dall play partners in life & crime, in this homoerotic 1948 classic.

(i) From which movie, is the above picture from? One of Hitchcock’s most experimental films, set in real time, was it also his first colour film?

(ii) This 1948 movie, was Alfred Hitchcock’s first depiction of Homosexuality, though only hinted on the subject matter, which real-life notorious scandal was this movie based on?

Q.6 Hitchcock & the surrealist artist
Dalí Spellbound(i) From which film, is this surreal dream sequence from, and who was the famous artist, who created these sets?

(ii) Who are the two lead stars of this psychological thriller, set in a mental asylum, who play two psychoanalysts? Which one is suffering from a phobia?

Q.7 Hitchcock 007

Tippi Hedren & Sean Connery (in a film from 1964)

Tippi Hedren & Sean Connery (in a film from 1964)

(i) In which Hitchcockian film, did Sean Connery, act in?

(ii) Did Connery appear in this film, before or after, he started acting in the James Bond franchise?

Q.8 Hitchcockian Train Journey’s

TOP: Dame May Whitty, Margaret Lockwood & Michael Redgrave in the 1938 noir classic. BELOW: Farley Granger & Robert Walker in the 1951 Highsmith adaptation.

TOP: Dame May Whitty, Margaret Lockwood & Michael Redgrave in the 1938 noir classic.
BELOW: Farley Granger & Robert Walker in the 1951 noir Highsmith adaptation.

(i) From which two films, where the train is significant to the plot, are the two above stills from?

(ii) Which of them is a British film, and which, a Hollywood venture?

(iii) Which of them was based on a Patricia Highsmith novel?

Q.9 Which is your favourite Hitchcock film, and why?

Q.10 Which of these, from Hitchcock’s two B-movie Horror films, Psycho (1960) and The Birds (1963), is your favourite?  

Nuwan Sen n’ Film Noir
Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense
Nuwan Sen’s Hitchcockian Sense

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense

DVD Films From Last Month PART-I

Under The Skin poster

As I mentioned in my post Holidaying in Australia, comes to an end, I ended up buying 26 films from Australia. I reached SL on the 15th of November, 2014, and started watching the DVD’s on the 16th, the very next day, itself.

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Art House Horror – Under The Skin

On Sunday afternoon, the 16th of November, 2014, I watched Under The Skin (2013). The film is about an Alien is human clothing, who drives around Scotland, UK, seducing horny men and devouring them. But when she suddenly sympathises with an inexperienced man suffering from facial neurofibromatosis (Adam Pearson, a man actually suffering from this rare disease was taken for the part), she lets him go. She tries to enter the human world, and be one of them, rather than use them to her benefit. Yet the more human she becomes, the more vulnerable she becomes to animalistic humans.

One of best Science-fiction/Art House/Horror films I’ve come across. It’s an unrealistic film, yet filmed so excellently realistic in style, like a documentary documenting this Aliens hungry escapades, involving the male flesh. To the extent of reality, the scenes filmed with Scarlett Johansson (who plays the Alien seductress) picking up men, were actual conversations with non-actors, men on the streets, filmed with many a hidden cameras in her van. That’s why those scenes were so naturalistic, because they weren’t acting, nor did they recognize Scarlett Johansson. Again the scene where she is walking on the street and suddenly falls down, walking into a shopping mall, et al, were all filmed with passers by unaware. Of course the men she’s seen with, where they are submerged into an abyss of liquid, leaving their skin behind, were obviously unknown actors.

Under The Skin (2013)

Under The Skin (2013)

The movie’s got beautiful cinematography, brilliantly filmed, capturing the Scottish Highlands, as well as in a surrealistic sense of the story, where the naked young men are dissolved inside the black space of the extraterrestrial world. There’ve been so many films about Aliens visiting/falling to/residing on earth, including Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977), Superman (1978), E.T. (1982), Starman (1984), Independence Day (1996), Men in Black (1997), The Faculty (1998), War of the Worlds (2005), I am Number 4 (2011) and The Darkest Hour (2011) to name some (and most of the films, especially the latter lot, mentioned, are pretty crap; in fact E.T. is the only excellent film mentioned above, Superman was very good, Men in Black was pretty good, and the rest range from OK to pretty bad to some of the worse films ever made). But the movie which, Under The Skin, is closest to, and reminds me of, is, The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976), with one of the legends of the pop music scene, David Bowie. The artistic, realistic, style, with an extraterrestrial walking through Earth, all are similarly in sync with the Bowie classic. Especially the slow, convincingly simulated realism, with an alien’s perspective of the human world, that takes it’s time to tell a story. Slow doesn’t necessarily mean it has to be boring, and Under The Skin, is far from boring, and much better than the pretty good B-movie classic, The Man Who Fell to Earth.

The scene where the alien starts to peel off her human skin, and reveals her inner Alien self, is a touching sequence. One can’t help but feel sorry for her more humanistic alien character in this inhumanly human world. The beauty sheds her skin to reveal the beast inside, which ends up being a more beautiful character than many indifferent beautiful people on Earth. One sympathises with her, despite what her alien personality lead her to do in the beginning of the film, before she saved one of her victims, letting out the naked man, suffering facial neurofibromatosis, run free.

The British director of, the near excellent gangster movie, Sexy Beast (2000) and, the pretty good film analysing re-birth, Birth (2004), Jonathan Glazer, has brought out a near excellent artistic venture with Under The Skin. Among the next best in science fiction and horror films. 9/10!!!!

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Lost in Space – Gravity

On 19th November, 2014, watched the excellent science fiction flick set in space, Gravity (2013).

An Exceptional movie of one woman’s lone struggle, whilst lost in space, of resilience and survival. Being all alone floating in the darkness of outer space, without any human contact, nor any visible plant or animal life, could be a formidable experience. Speaking of suffering from loss and loneliness on planet Earth, it’s hard to even conceive what it must be like for Dr. Ryan Stone (the character played by Sandra Bullock), out there in the inhabitable eternal blackness, circumnavigating afloat, with our habitable planet afar, in sight. Gravity is both a psychological and visual treat, by Mexican director Alfonso Cuarón. The only other movie of his I’ve seen till date is, the near excellent Mexican film, Y Tu Mamá También (2001), starring, my favourite Mexican actor, Gael García Bernal, along with his real life best buddy, Diego Luna. I watched Y Tu Mamá También a decade ago, whilst residing in Portsmouth, UK, in mid 2004.

On the sets of GRAVITY, Alfonso Cuarón directing Sandra Bullock & George Clooney

On the sets of GRAVITY, Alfonso Cuarón directing Sandra Bullock & George Clooney

Gravity is among the best movies set in space, coming fourth in line, after 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968), which no doubt is the best Space-age film ever, Interstellar (2014), the next best, another visually stunning intellectual experience, and of course the animated movie, WALL·E (2008), comes a close third. Says a lot about how great WALL·E is, considering the fact, am not that crazy about animated movies.

One of the best sequences in the film happens to be Dr. Ryan Stone trying to contact the human world, and ends us speaking to Aningaaq, an Eskimo residing in a Fjord in Greenland. Of course Aningaaq isn’t showcased in this movie, but I also watched, the 7 minute short film, Aningaaq (2013), which was on the DVD as well, directed by Jonás Cuarón, son of Alfonso Cuarón. An excellent prequel/sequel to Gravity. Aningaaq, shows us the Eskimo’s side of the communication, during radio contact with Dr. Ryan Stone. They speak two different languages, thus don’t understand one another. The DVD also contained the insightful documentary of how man’s been polluting the space around Earth, narrated by Ed Harris, Collision Point: The Race to Clean up Space (2014).

Another sequence is, soon after the radio contact, sole survivor, Dr. Ryan Stone’s hallucination, of fellow astronaut, Matt Kowalski (George Clooney). It’s this hallucination that helps her not give up so easily. The ghost of Matt Kowalski guides her, giving her the necessary push, to somehow make it back home, to Mother Earth.

Alfonso Cuarón, deservedly won the Best director Oscar for Gravity, making him the first Hispanic and Mexican to win an Academy Award for ‘Best Director’. Gravity, won 7 Oscars, out of the 10 nominations, including for ‘Best Visual Effects’ and ‘Best Cinematography’. 10/10!!!!!   

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Romance & Revenge – Indiscreet

Watched the classic Rom-Com starring Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman, Indiscreet (1958), on 20th November 2014.

Ingrid Bergman with Cary Grant in INDISCREET (1958)

Ingrid Bergman with Cary Grant in INDISCREET (1958)

Based on a play by Norman Krasna, Indiscreet, is about an actress of the British stage, who’s just entered her middle ages, and falls for a man who is unable to get a divorce from his wife, thus can never marry the woman he loves. Once she finds out he’s been lying to her all this time to avoid the subject of marriage, a bold a woman as she is, she concocts an excellent plan to take revenge, which ends up blowing up on her face, and his.

This is the second pairing of Cary Grant and Ingrid Bergman, since their outstanding performance in the Hitchcock masterpiece of film noir, Notorious (1946). Contrasting to the nerve wrecking, psychologically disturbingly excellent noir piece, the Hitchcock classic was, here we see the two stars in a lighter vein, in a hilarious comedy. Might not be the greatest romantic comedy ever, but it’s really worth checking out, especially for fans of Bergman & Grant. They are superbly and eccentrically funny. 8/10!!!! 

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Gay Cancer of the 80’s – The Normal Heart

Based on real events, watched the television movie The Normal Heart (2014), on 21st November 2014.

One of the best gay-themed films to come out in recent times. Based on the life of gay activist, and playwright, Larry Kramer (based on his autobiographical play), The Normal Heart, is a superb insight into the early days of the HIV/AIDS virus. Back in the early 80’s, it was dubbed as a ‘Gay Cancer’, as the AIDS epidemic only seemed to be attacking homosexual men. The American government did nothing about it, as it didn’t seem to affect anyone who wasn’t engaged in sexual intercourse with the opposite sex. A very depressingly educational film, yet made beautifully, and worth really checking out.

Larry Kramer’s character, Ned Weeks (played by Mark Ruffalo), even goes on to accuse the American government of being involved in a conspiracy to kill off the entire homosexual community of the United States. Who could blame him for feeling that way back then. Julia Roberts plays Dr. Emma Brookner, a wheelchair bound doctor (due to polio), who happens to be the only doctor, who dares to do any research to help AIDS patients. Taylor Kitsch, in one of his rare great roles, plays Bruce Niles, a closeted activist, who’s less vocal and forward, unlike Ned Weeks. There are smaller, yet effective roles, by famous television stars, such as BD Wong, Jim Parsons, Jonathan Groff and Frank De Julio, to name a few. But the icing on the cake, is Matt Bomer’s deeply effective realistic performance, as newspaper reporter, for the New York Times, Felix Turner, the lover of Ned Weeks, who’s dying of AIDS. Bomer lost 40 pounds for his role, turning himself into a sickly looking individual, contrasting to the bewitchingly attractive character we see him as, earlier on, in the movie. The best performance of Bomer’s I’ve seen till date.
The Normal HeartOn this DVD, I also watched an insightful documentary called, How To Start A War (2014). A profound look at the true story behind The Normal Heart and the life of playwright Larry Kramer.

The Normal Heart, bagged the Emmy for ‘Outstanding Television Movie’ along with another win for ‘Outstanding (Non-Prosthetic) Makeup for a Television Miniseries or Movie’. From Mark Ruffalo to Alfred Molina to Matt Bomer, six cast members were nominated for Emmy Awards, including one for ‘Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Television Miniseries or Movie’, for Julia Roberts. Plus director Ryan Murphy and writer Larry Kramer, were nominated as well, along with a couple of nominations for cinematography and casting. Sadly none of these categories garnered a win at the Emmy’s. But the cast et al, did win some awards at various other award ceremonies.

The Normal Heart, is a really touching, emotional and educational film, that should be shown/taught in schools. 10/10 !!!!!   

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Advocated Entrapment  – The Firm

On Sunday night, the 23rd of November, 2014, watched The Firm (1993), a thriller based on a John Grisham novel.

Sydney Pollack’s slick thriller, based on the Grisham novel, is a very 1990’s flick. After a young lawyer, Mitch McDeere (Tom Cruise), foolishly falls into an entrapment through advocacy, we see him hatch up an intriguing plan so that neither the Law Firm, nor the FBI, can screw up his life. It’s a very stylish, typical Grisham style thriller, though I haven’t read this particular book of his.

The Firm (1993)

The Firm (1993)

This was an era when Tom Cruise still had taste, when it comes to selecting a venture to work in. Cruise has worked in some exceptional projects back in the late 80’s and 90’s. It’s a pity his roles today aren’t that well selected. He’d rather make a load of money than prove himself as an actor, and he is a good actor, when he comes in good, worthwhile, movies. Movies that he’ll be remembered for in the future. It’s sad. Get back onto doing more challenging roles, like in Rain Man (1988), Born on the Fourth of July (1989), A Few Good Men (1992), Interview with the Vampire (1994), Jerry Maguire (1996),  Minority Report (2002), The Last Samurai (2003), and Valkyrie (2008), to name a few. These movies showcase his ascend as an actor.

With a great cast including Gene Hackman, Ed Harris, Holly Hunter (who was nominated for the ‘Best Supporting Actress’ Oscar for her role here); Jeanne Tripplehorn, Hal Holbrook, David Strathairn, Gary Busey and Wilford Brimley; The Firm, is really worth checking out. A very good adaptation. 8/10!!!!

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Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense

To and fro Australia, I got to watch a few of the latest film releases, in mid air, on the tiny little screen. Here is the run down.
InFlight FilmsBoyhood (2014)
I watched Boyhood (2014), on the 2nd/3rd of November 2014, mostly on the Emirates flight, from Colombo to Singapore, and the latter bit in the Qantas flight from Singapore to Sydney. (See my post Holidaying in South Australia)

12 years in the making, taking a big risk, film director Richard Linklater has brought out an exceptional piece of movie making in the history of cinema. America’s answer to European Art Cinema, one of the best to come out in recent years. Set within the 12 years the movie was made in, we literally see, the lead actor, Ellar Coltrane (playing Mason) grow up in front of our eyes, from ages 6 to 18; as does Lorelei Grace Linklater (real life daughter of the film director, who plays Samantha, Mason’s older sister). And the best part is their parents, played by Ethan Hawke and Patricia Arquette, naturally mature within those 12 years, sans make-up, or computer graphics, to make them look older.

The premise of the film is extremely simple. The movie is a coming of age story, coinciding with the child’s own real-life coming of age, and the battle adults face, as two separated parents, bringing up their two children, to the best of their ability, as well as possible, in the 21 century United States, from 2002 till date. Though separated, both are very good parents to their children. The movie could easily be translated as ‘Parenthood’, just as much as it is ‘Boyhood’. Majority of the film  is literally filmed per year, showing us the children in each age, but in some places it skips a year.

Richard Linklater’s 12 year risk, shot in real-time, has paid off, by taking up such a simplistic storyline, and turning it into a marvellously stylistic and artistic piece of cinematic experience. One of the Best films 0f Year 2014.

Love the cast, Love the movie, Love everything about it. Such an authentic piece of realistic cinema. Pure Artistry! 10/10 for Excellence!!!!!
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Magic in the Moonlight (2014)
Watched the Woody Allen comedy, Magic in the Moonlight (2014) on the Qantas Airways flight from Sydney to Singapore, on the 14th of November 2014. (See my posts Holidaying in South Australia & Holidaying in Australia, comes to an end)

Set in the roaring 20’s, on the French Riviera, this comedy is about a fraudulent magician, a snobbish Englishman (Colin Firth), who tries to unmask yet another deceitful spiritualist (Emma Stone), in turn falling for her and her gag. It’s an enjoyable enough old school comedy, yet it starts to be too predictable and falter towards the end. Definitely not Woody Allen’s finest directorial venture, and no where near his unmatchable Art House, romantic comedies, from back in day, like Annie Hall (1977) and Manhattan (1979). But he’s still definitely got the knack for farcical story telling, yet Magic in the Moonlight is not one of them.

OK fare. 6/10 !!!       
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The Two Faces of January (2014)
Watched The Two Faces of January (2014), on the 15th of November 2014, early morning/past 14th midnight, on the next flight, Emirates Airlines, from Singapore to Colombo. (See my post Holidaying in Australia, comes to an end)

Being a fan of Patricia Highsmith crime thrillers, I was really looking forward to watching this latest Hollywood cinematic adaptation by, Iranian born British director, Hossein Amini. My favourite Highsmith book happens to be The Talented Mr. Ripley, and I enjoyed reading Strangers on a Train as well. Added to that, I also love their film adaptations. Hitchcock’s excellent adaptation that was Strangers on a Train (1951). René Clément’s French thriller, Plein Soleil (1959/60), with Alain Delon as Mr. Ripley, based on Highsmith’s The Talented Mr. Ripley. Anthony Minghella’s The Talented Mr. Ripley (1999) starring Jude Law and Gwyneth Paltrow, with Matt Damon playing Mr. Ripley. And of course, though not as excellent as the previous three, the very good adaptation that was, Ripley’s Game (2002), starring an exceptional John Malkovich as Mr. Ripley.

The Two Faces of January starts off well, and is pretty well made, transporting us back to the early 1960’s Athens. The suspenseful thriller is almost Hitchcockian till the main crime takes place. Post that, it starts to waver somewhat. Being based on a Highsmith crime, the storyline is really good, but the film seems in a rush to tie up any loose ends and finish the movie as soon as possible. It doesn’t let the story develop, nor the characters. If the movie wasn’t made just in 96 minutes, and took it’s time a bit more to tell the story, Highsmith’s work could have been done justice to. There are some flicks which are unnecessarily too long, and waste a lot time on unnecessary stuff, while here it’s the exact opposite. It’s tries too quickly to bind things together, killing of the cinematic experience, into a tight, and very hurried up, 96 minutes. This is Hossein Amini second film, and first feature length work, as a director.

Good Try, by the director, with an OK/watchable outcome. 6/10 !!!                  
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Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense
Nuwan Sen n’ Travel/Film

Judging the film by the titles.
Doesn’t matter whether I love these movies or not, I love these interesting film titles. They sound pretty cool.
Film Titles
I took part in a poll on IMDB, about favourite film titles. In two parts, it asked us to select our favourite film title, pre-1975 & post-1975. For pre-1975, I chose A Clockwork Orange (1971) as my favourite title, and for post-1975, I chose Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004) as my favourite title. For overall favourite title I chose A Clockwork Orange, of course. See their polls as well Run-Off: The Best Film Title EverRun-Off: The Best Film Titles Part I & Run Off Poll: The Best Film Titles Part II.

Have your ever loved the title of a movie, but not necessarily the film? Let me know your favourite film title, from a literary sense. I love most of the 100 movies listed below, some more than others. But the list is mainly to do with my favourite film titles, some are based on novels, plays etc etc.. that I happen to love too. There might be many a films I’ve missed out, as I’ve narrowed this down to just 100 films out of the zillion that exist. Feel free to add, and let me know your favourite title of a film, not your favourite film, unless of course they are one and the same.

A Clockwork Orange (1971)

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958)

To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)

Fiddler on the Roof (1971)

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004)

Anne of the Thousand Days (1969)

A Room with a View (1985)

Thank you for Smoking (2005)

Woman in the Dunes (1964)

Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf ? (1966)

Chariots of Fire (1981)

Catch Me If You Can (2002)

Confessions of a Dangerous Mind (2002)

The Last Emperor (1987)

Gone With The Wind (1939)

Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961)

Breakfast on Pluto (2005)

Y Tu Mamá También (2001)

The Lady Vanishes (1938 & 1979)

36, Chowringhee Lane (1981)

Last Tango in Paris (1972)

La Mala Educación (2004)

Through a Glass Darkly (1961)

The Triplets of Belleville (2003)

The Great Gatsby (2013)

The Sheltering Sky (1990)

I Heart Huckabees (2004)

1947 Earth (1998)

3:10 to Yuma (2007)

Carnage (2011)

Heat and Dust (1983)

Dr. Strangelove: or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)

The Year of Living Dangerously (1982)

Caesar and Cleopatra (1945)

Rebecca (1940)

Casablanca (1942)

Anna Karenina (1935 & 2012)

Cleopatra (1963)

Malèna (2000)

The Knife in the Water (1962)

Double Indemnity (1944)

Zwartboek (2006)

The Namesake (2006)

Good Will Hunting (1997)

Jules et Jim (1962)

Muqaddar Ka Sikandar (1978)

The Cider House Rules (1999)

Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress (2002)

Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977)

The Silence of the Lambs (1991)

Interview with the Vampire (1994)

No Country for Old Men (2007)

A Passage to India (1984)

The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934 & 1956)

The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976)

The Americanization of Emily (1964)

Lawrence of Arabia (1962)

Shakespeare Wallah (1965)

Saving Private Ryan (1998)

West Side Story (1961)

Silver Linings Playbook (2012)

The Pelican Brief (1993)

Roman Holiday (1953)

City Lights (1931)

A Few Good Men (1992)

12 Angry Men (1957 & 1997)

Salaam Bombay! (1988)

Silkwood (1983)

Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994)

The 39 Steps (1935)

The Thirty-Nine Steps (1978)

Charlie Wilson’s War (2007)

Singin’ in the Rain (1952)

Life of Pi (2012)

The Iron Lady (2011)

To Sir, with Love (1967)

My Fair Lady (1964)

Sleeping with the Enemy (1991)

Metropolis (1927)

Paris, Texas (1984)

Erin Brockovich (2000)

Chinatown (1974)

Hideous Kinky (1998)

Rosemary’s Baby (1968)

The Wizard of Oz (1939)

Brief Encounter (1945)

Tess (1979)

Modern Times (1936)

WALL-E (2008)

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953)

Trainspotting (1996)

The Rainmaker (1997)

Easy Rider (1969)

The Sound of Music (1965)

Doctor Zhivago (1965)

Latter Days (2003)

The Sheik (1921)

Notting Hill (1999)

Dans Paris (2006)

Wilde (1997)

This is not in order of my favourite films; as I like Breakfast at Tiffany’s more than A Clockwork Orange, and Gone With The Wind more than both of them put together, and Roman Holiday, which happens to be my all time favourite movie is no.63 in the list; but in order of my favourite titles, of unique names, that tend to have a nice ring to them. Would like to hear about your favourites.

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense
Nuwan Sen’s Film Title Sense

60's finaléThe month of September came to end, and so did The Essential 60’s Blogathon, hosted by me, Nuwan Sen.  A very big Thank you to my blog pals, who contributed to it. Without you this blogathon could not have been possible.
Below is a list of participants and the films they wrote on.
Thank you once again for taking part in it.
Nuwan Sen

List of Participants & Films (in order of year released)
Cindy Bruchman The Hustler (1961)
Nuwan Sen –  Dr Strangelove, or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)
Roger Poladopoulos (A Guy without Boxers)The Boys In The Band (1970)
Halim – Down With Love (2003)

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense