Tag Archive: New Delhi


Sen 40 Blog Post

I first came across Sushmita Sen, back in early 1994, in New Delhi (we went to re-live in New Delhi, in February 94’, when my father was assigned for a posting at the Sri Lankan High Commission in New Delhi, for a second time), when I read about how she was crowned Miss India for Miss Universe that year, when Aishwarya Rai, who apparently seemed more beautiful, had tripped on her shoe (or something like that), thus Rai ended up bagging the runner-up (i.e. the Miss India for Miss World title) for 1994. I read this most probably in one of my mum’s Femina magazines.

Miss India, Sushmita Sen, being crowned Miss Universe, in May 1994 !!

Miss India, 18 year old, Sushmita Sen; being crowned Miss Universe, in May 1994 !!!!

Then one day, in May 1994, when I woke up, the television was on, my old man was watching the news, when it was announced that Miss India 1994, Sushmita Sen, had bagged the Miss Universe crown. We all gathered round the telly, to see a genuinely (pleasantly) shocked expression on the bewitchingly beautiful face, of an 18 year old Ms. Sen, as she was being announced as the winner that year. I was smitten, by this natural beauty who was the same age as me. Sushmita Sen, was the very first Indian to win the Miss Universe crown (We watched the telecast of the pageant, the same night, I believe). Plus 1994, was a double whammy for beauty queens from around the globe, when 21 year old Aishwarya Rai, bagged the Miss World title later that year itself; making Rai the second Indian beauty to win the Miss World crown (the first being Reita Faria in 1966, in fact Faria was the first Asian ever to win the Miss World title). Since 1994 onwards I’ve followed Sushmita Sen’s progress, as a socialite, a humanitarian and an actress. Today she’s amongst my favourite Indian personalities ever.

Sen's Childhood & Children Main PIX: Sushmita Sen, with her two daughters; Renée and Alisah. Inset: Sushmita Sen in her schooldays, with her brother.

                                 Sen’s Childhood & Children
Main PIX: Sushmita Sen, with her two daughters; Renée and Alisah.
Inset: Sushmita Sen in her schooldays, with her brother.

Within the last 21 years, Sen has achieved a lot in her life. In her mid-20’s, unmarried and single, she became a mother, when she adopted a child. Today she has two daughters through adoption; Renée and Alisah. Plus Sen, being from the Asian continent (more specifically from South Asia), that veers towards the preference to a male child over a female, has been a vocal advocate in India, on saving the Girl Child. Her superb acting talent has been overshadowed by her long limbed sultry persona. Thus she’s been wasted in minor roles, in many a useless movies. Yet she’s also done some exquisite roles, in not so great movies. She definitely deserves way better.

Slut vs. Saint: Chingaari (2006), wasn't necessarily a good movie (average fare). Yet Sushmita Sen was superb in her role of a prostitute.

Slut vs. Saint: Chingaari (2006), wasn’t necessarily a good movie (average fare), yet Sushmita Sen was superb in her role of a prostitute.

From Princess Gayatri Devi (1919-2009), to the first female Prime Minister of India – Indira Gandhi (1917-1984), to Nutan (1936-1991), to Simi Garewal, to Shabana Azmi, to Sushmita Sen, et al; these are some of the classiest, intellectual, sophisticated, open-minded, free-thinking, female humanist’s & fashionista’s of modern India, that constantly thrive/d to make India a better place, constantly moving forward, in the right direction.

Sushmita Sen joins me today, by turning 40!!!! Happy Birthday Miss Sen. Welcome to the Fabulous years of our lives, yet to come (we can hope for the best, can’t we?). Wishing you all the best!

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense

Posters from Sushmita Sen’s most recent film release, Nirbaak (2014)

Posters from Sushmita Sen’s most recent film release, Nirbaak (2014)

P.S. Down with the viral flu, though am better today, last thing I wanted to do was a blog post (I didn’t even switch on my laptop for almost a week, and prior to that being so busy n’ tired, not to mention the unnecessary stress that slithers it’s way in, I’ve hardly got the chance to work on anything properly). But today morning, when I realised that it was Sushmita Sen’s birthday, I felt I had to write something. Especially, ‘cause, since June 2015, I’ve been doing posts on some of my favourite personalities turning 40 this year. And I shan’t skip on this elegant lady, that I’ve been a fan of, since we were both 18, just ‘cause of a heavy head. Thus, please do keep my flu in mind, lest I haven’t done Ms. Sen justice, by doing such a quick write-up, sans research.  

Nuwan Sen (nu Sense on Film)
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John Lennon, what can I say!!! He’s my favourite Beatle, a Peace Activist & a modern day saint. Artiste Extraordinaire!!!!
John LennonIMAGINE!!! A world without John Lennon, The Beatles and Lennon & Ono’s Peace Activism and Pacifism. Impossible! I can’t!! The world wouldn’t be what it is today; the open minded, free spirited, sphere, with comparatively lesser wars than the epical carnages that history chronicles. He brought Peace through his music, his lyrics and the famous Bed-In’s. People are more understanding (or should be) than ever before. Not that the world is full of empathicalists today (far from it, especially in this island, that I live in), but the world is slowly improving for the better to some extent (see ’s, existentialist character, Jo Stockton, teach her co-star a thing or two about ‘Empathicalism’, in one of her movies, in my Blog post, for Audrey Hepburn’s 85th from May 2014). And John Lennon, along side his second wife, artist, Yoko Ono, played an important role, for this ever changing world, in the late 60’s & 70’s. If he were alive today, John Lennon would be celebrating his 75th Birthday, on this day, with his messages of peace, love & equality. A sad loss of a legend, a humanitarian, a believer of Equal Rights, a man without borders and an intellectual.
John Lennon SupermanTo John Lennon (1940-1980)!!!!! A & a real life Superhero!!

Initially, as a kid, when I first saw the music video of Lennon’s Imagine, featuring John Lennon & Yoko Ono, I felt a bit bored. But slowly I started loving the lyrics, the music crawled under my skin, and I started having a great admiration for The Beatles as a whole. And by the early 90’s, Lennon’s Imagine, was, and till date is, my all time favourite song. Since the early 90’s, I’ve read so much on The Beatles, especially Lennon and Paul McCartney, the songs they co-wrote, and have listened to practically every single song The Beatles, and post-Beatles Lennon, ever released. More recently, mid-2007, whilst living in Sydney, Australia, I watched The U.S. vs. John Lennon (2006), on the Big Screen, down there. A very inspiring documentary focusing on Lennon’s quest for world peace, the famed War Is Over posters, anti-Vietnam war protests; and specifically emphasising the futile attempts by President Richard Nixon’s, American, government, to silence him. John Lennon managed to shake Nixon’s government to the edge of paranoiac fear, just through his songs, especially Give Peace a Chance. An exceptional documentary, and am glad I got to watch, The U.S. vs. John Lennon, on the Big Screen. I’d generally rarely watch a documentary in the cinema, but ’twas totally worth it!!

John Lennon with his fellow Beatles; including best pal, Paul McCartney; in the mid-60’s

John Lennon (far right), with his fellow Beatles; including best pal, Paul McCartney (in the middle); in the mid-60’s

John Lennon was also a feminist (see my post Beatle News #10 from April 2013), who took his wife’s, Yoko Ono’s, surname, on the 22nd of April, 1969, as a middle name, through an official ‘Deed of Change of Name’. Thus changing his name from John Winston Lennon to John Winston Ono Lennon, a month after they were married (in March 20th, 1969). Proper Feminism is about Equal Rights, between men and women, thus it’s not essential for one to own a pair of breasts to be a feminist. Being a believer of Equal rights myself, I consider myself a feminist as well; though being a free thinker and a believer of equal rights on varied issues of race, religion, gender and sexuality, the tag of feminism alone isn’t enough to describe who I am. None the less, I believe in the stone faced feminism of the 60’s & 70’s, and am a die hard fan of John Lennon, not just due to his music, but for the kind of great humanitarian he was.

John Lennon & Yoko Ono, during their famous Bed-In’s for Peace, in 1969

John Lennon & Yoko Ono, during their famous Bed-In’s for Peace, in 1969

In early 2012, I was in New Delhi, India, during the annual World Book Fair, and, among many, ended up buying two books on the Beatles; The Beatles: The Days of their Life by Richard Havers (copyright:2010) and A Hard Days Write: The Stories behind every Beatles Song (New and Updated Edition (copyright:1994, new edition:2010)) by Steve Turner. I started blogging in March 2012, and meanwhile, after going through theses books, they soon inspired me to start a segment, on my Blog. Do check out all my Beatle News, from #1 to #33, I posted between March 2013 and February 2014, especially the ones on , and their famous ’s () and Bagism, for World Peace (including Beatle News #4, Beatle News #5, Beatle News #11, Beatle News #12 and Beatle News #16).

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Beatle News  #34:
On Tuesday, 6th of October, thousands of people joined together to form a human Peace sign in honour of John Lennon’s 75th Birth Anniversary, three day before his birthday. This tribute took place in Central Park’s East Meadow, New York, in the United States of America. I wish I was there, as one of the participants. His widow, Yoko Ono, is currently helping to fund a mobile studio called The Lennon Bus, in his name, to help music students and aspiring songwriters. This year also marks the 35th Death Anniversary of John Lennon, who was shot by a deranged fan, on the 8th of December, 1980.

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John Lennon & Yoko Ono with their newborn, Sean Ono Lennon, in 1975.

John Lennon & Yoko Ono with their newborn, Sean Ono Lennon, in 1975.

Today also happens to be, Lennon’s second son’s (Lennon & Ono’s only child together), Sean Ono Lennon’s, 40th Birthday as well. Both Lennon & Ono have a child each, from their previous marriages as well.

Sean Ono Lennon earlier this year (April 2015)

Sean Ono Lennon, who turns 40 today, in a picture taken earlier this year, in April 2015.

Sean Taro Ono Lennon was born on John Lennon’s 35th Birthday, on the 9th of October, 1975. A parent couldn’t have asked for a better birthday present than that. Going back to John Lennon’s feminism, after the birth of Sean Lennon, John became a house husband and stay-at-home dad, taking full responsibility for the care of his younger child, until John Lennon was killed five years later. Though, no where near as famous, as his post-modernist, aesthetically superior, parents, Sean Ono Lennon, too is a music artiste and activist, in his own right.

Sean Ono Lennon, who turns 40 today, in a picture taken earlier this year, in April 2015.

Sean Ono Lennon, who turns 40 today, in a picture taken earlier this year, in April 2015.

To John Lennon and Sean Lennon, who were born this day, 75, & 40, years ago, respectively. John Lennon shall forever live on through his brilliant musical legacy and Peace activism. And wishing Sean Ono Lennon all the best, and hope he’ll keep carrying the torch forward (the legacy of his father), like his mother, Yoko Ono has continued to do so. Have a fantastical 40th Birthday, Sean Ono Lennon.

Nuwan Sen n’ The Beatles
Nuwan Sen’s Music Sense

Pure British Sophistication!!! Chic & Classy, the Poshest of the Posh, Kate Winslet joins me, by turning 40 today. So, Happy Birthday, to one of my favourite Brits, of the 21st century!!!!!

English Rose: Kate Winslet turn 40!

English Rose: Kate Winslet turn 40!

With her charming smile, her naturalistic simple appearance, and eloquently well spoken British English, that would have pleased Professor Higgins; Kate Winslet today, is one of the most talented British actresses to have graced the Big Screen, both, in her own homeland, as well as Hollywood. Her elegantly well spoken, vocal diction, is the most articulate, since Julie Andrews, ran singing up the Austrian hills in a habit, 50 years ago. Winslet’s acting skills are second to none other than that of, the marvellous 66 year old, Meryl Streep. With her great cinematic choices; grace, elegance, poise, and such a kindly face; she is my favourite actress of this century.

Back in the mid-90’s, I read a small snippet on the movie, Jude (1996), most probably before it’s release, on some magazine, which accompanied a picture of Kate Winslet and Christopher Eccleston. To my memory, this was the very first I heard, and/or saw a picture, of Kate Winslet. I don’t recall coming across anything about her, prior to that. I was really keen of watching Jude at the time, as it was based on the novel, Jude The Obscure, by Thomas Hardy. Soon I forgot the cast, but remembered that there was a movie called Jude, that I wish to see. Then in early 1998, in my second year, at Delhi University, Titanic (1997) was being shown at a relatively newer Cineplex in the city. Multiplexes were quite new back in the 90’s, in New Delhi, thus a craze among young Delhiites, and we had heard about the curved wide screens at this particular cinema, with multiple halls, called Satyam Cineplex. So one wintry night, close to spring, along with some fellow students (friends & acquaintances), we went all the way to Satyam, which was quite a distance, from the north campus, to watch the late night show of Titanic. Getting the tickets wasn’t easy, even at that late hour, and we ended up in the front row seats. Generally not a fan of sitting right in front, but Titanic was totally worth it. As the lead  character played by Michael Pitt, in my favourite film on film buffs, The Dreamers (2003), states, about sitting right up front in the cinema, “it was because we wanted to receive the images first. When they were still new, still fresh. Before they cleared the hurdles of the rows behind us. Before they’d been relayed back from row to row, spectator to spectator; until worn out, second-hand, the size of a postage stamp, it returned to the projectionist’s cabin.” Over five years later, when I watched Michael Pitt’s character, Matthew, narrate those words, I could relate to it, especially since I watched at least two movies in that manner, in my DU years, and one of them was Titanic. I loved the movie; even though somewhat censored, when it came to the innocent, non-sexual, nudity showcased in the film; and everything about it, including Kate Winslet. Post that, I’ve seen Titanic quite a few times.

Kate Winslet in Jude (1996)

Kate Winslet in Jude (1996)

Being a great fan of Sandra Bullock, back in the 90’s, Winslet didn’t become my favourite actress, over-night. Literally!!! Titanic ended past midnight, thus next morning, and it was freezing cold by then. Later that year, I saw Jude, and fell in love with it, and thought Kate Winslet was brilliant. A couple of years later, I got to re-watch it. Consequently, over the next few years, I watched quite a lot of films of hers, some good, some not so, including, Heavenly Creatures (1994), Sense and Sensibility (1995), Hamlet (1996), Hideous Kinky (1998), Holy Smoke (1999), Quills (2000), Enigma (2001) and Iris (2001). Jude happens to be my favourite of Kate Winslet movie from the 1990’s.

Then in 2004, whilst living in Portsmouth, UK, I watched two interesting movies of hers. One was the really good thriller, with a very clever twist, The Life of David Gale (2003). The other, was the brilliant, surreal, masterpiece, Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004); for which Winslet was nominated for a fourth time, and which was her second ‘Best Actress’ nomination, the following year. So, Year 2004, was the year, Kate Winslet, became my favourite actress. And since then, she is till date, my favourite female star of the 21st century. Back in 2000, I fell in love with Jude Law, practically replacing Matt Damon, as my favourite actor, when I watched The Talented Mr. Ripley (1999), my favourite film from the 90’s decade, for which Law received his very first Oscar nomination. But it was four years later, after watching some more of his movies, that Law really became my favourite male star of the 21st century. So Year 2004, was a crucial year, for both Jude Law (who had quite a few releases that year) and Kate Winslet (mainly in regard to me). Year 2004, was when Law & Winslet, became my two favourite films stars, of the new century; and 11 years later, they still are (though unfortunately, Law hasn’t appeared in anything that impressive lately). It’s an interesting coincidence, to note, that both, Law & Winslet, happen to be Brits. Back then, they hadn’t actually worked together. But post 2004, Law & Winslet, have worked in a trio of films, out of which, I’ve unfortunately watched only, The Holiday (2006). A beautiful Christmassy romance flick, and if I remember correctly, I watched it on Boxing Day 2006, the day after Christmas; in Sydney, Australia. Later, I re-watched The Holiday, with my flatmates on DVD, the following year.

Law & Winslet: Movies in which both, Jude Law and Kate Winslet, appeared in.

Law & Winslet: Movies in which both, Jude Law and Kate Winslet, appeared in.

Then in early 2007, one Summer evening, at the height of the dry Australian heat, I saw Little Children (2006), on the Big Screen. Another excellent, Art House, film, and another superb Kate Winslet performance, for which she received her third ‘Best Actress’ Oscar nomination. By 2005, she was already, the youngest celebrity to be nominated four times, by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (Oscars). She was still 29, when she was nominated for a fourth time, for Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.

Then came her magnum opus, The Reader (2008), for which she finally won the ‘Best Actress Oscar’. ’twas about time. I watched The Reader, twice within 2009 itself, the latter was on the Big Screen, in Paris, France. Today The Reader is my favourite of Kate Winslet movies. She’s definitely come a long way since her Titanic days. By now, I’ve seen quite a load of Winslet films of this century, including, Finding Neverland (2004), Romance & Cigarettes (2005), Revolutionary Road (2008), Carnage (2011) and Labor Day (2013). Added to which, I’ve also seen the excellent TV-miniseries, Mildred Pierce (2011), for which Kate Winslet won a Golden Globe award, an Emmy, among other wins, as well, for her performance as the titular character of the show. From her movies, that I haven’t seen yet, am really keen on watching, War Game (2002) & Pride (2004); for which she had lent her voice; All the King’s Men (2006), Contagion (2011), A Little Chaos (2014), Steve Jobs (2015) and The Dressmaker (2015), to name some.

It’s interesting to note, that Kate Winslet has appeared in some of my favourite pieces of literature, including adaptations of, Shakespeare’s Hamlet (an excellent modern adaptation), Bernhard Schlink’s The Reader, and Richard Yates’ Revolutionary Road. Love those Books, Love their movie adaptations just as much.

Wishing Kate Winslet, all the best, on her 40th Birthday (Actors, Parminder Nagra and Scott Weinger, also turn 40 today. Best Wishes to them as well).

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense

Kate Winslet in Titanic (1997)

Kate Winslet in Titanic (1997)

Related posts/lists

Six Degrees of Separation: Kate Winslet
Mildred Pierce: TV miniseries
K Winslet
Oscar Winners … and then some 2012.
Labor Day: An Enjoyable Piece of Labour

(NSFS

Today happens to be the 101st Birth Anniversary of my all time favourite cinematographer, Jack Cardiff. His uniquely brilliant, colourful aesthetics, in movies like. Powell&Pressburger’s Black Narcissus (1947) and The Red Shoes (1948), Alfred Hitchcock’s Under Capricorn (1949), and King Vidor’s War and Peace (1956), are stunningly splendid, with it’s vivid spectrum of striking colours. His creations on the big screen, are pure art. A massive canvas filled with moving pictures.

Jack CardiffJack Cardiff was born on the 18th of September, 1914, to a couple of music hall performers. By the age of four, he was already a child artiste, who’d worked in music hall productions as well as a few silent movies. As a child actor he starred in My Son, My Son (1918), Billy’s Rose (1922), The Loves of Mary, Queen of Scots (1923) and Tiptoes (1927). By 15 he started working as a camera assistant, clapper boy and production runner. By 21, Cardiff had graduated to camera operator and occasional cinematographer. Having already worked with Alfred Hitchcock, in The Skin Game (1931), as a clapper boy; soon he got a chance to work with Powell&Pressburger, as a second unit cameraman. Powell&Pressburger were so impressed that they hired him as a cinematographer, and the rest is history.

Ben Cross and Amy Irving in The Far Pavilions (1984)

Ben Cross and Amy Irving in The Far Pavilions (1984)

Ben Cross and Omar Sharif in a scene from The Far Pavilions

Ben Cross and Omar Sharif in a scene from The Far Pavilions

As a little kid, back in the mid-1980’s, I watched The Far Pavilions (1984), a beautiful mini-series, set in India, in the 1800’s. Back then, I had no idea who Jack Cardiff was, but was amazed by the superbly, epic scale, picturesque, television show, which has been tagged as, “Gone With The Wind (1939), of the north-west frontier of India.” I got to re-watch it in my teens, back in the early 1990’s. Thus, even though unaware at the time, this was my very first Cardiff involved show, that I witnessed. And I’ll end up watching quite a few Cardiff’s aesthetic brilliance of the big screen (on the small screen), before I learn the cinematographer responsible for the visual beauty of these great movies.

The Red Shoes (2)

Moira Shearer in The Red Shoes (1948)

Moira Shearer in The Red Shoes (1948)

Scenes from The Red Shoes

Scenes from The Red Shoes

Still as a kid, towards late 80’s, when I watched The Red Shoes, I was spellbound. The beautiful colour combination, costumes, the respectable art form of the ballet, the story, the movie as a whole, I fell in love with it almost instantaneously. And at the time I didn’t even realise it was an old movie. Especially ’cause I had no idea who the actors were. By then I knew quite a few classic stars, from Charles Chaplin, Laurence Olivier, Cary Grant, Ingrid Bergman, Audrey Hepburn, Elizabeth Taylor, Sophia Loren, Julie Andrews, Henry Fonda, Jane Fonda, Al Pacino et al; so I felt these must be very new actors, who aren’t famous yet. In fact, even now, besides The Red Shoes, am not familiar with the work of Moira Shearer (who was actually a renowned ballet dancer, and had appeared in very few films), Austrian actor, Anton Walbrook, and Marius Goring. The story follows the life of a young ballerina, who becomes the lead dancer in a new ballet called, The Red Shoes, a fairy tale. The movie tells a story within a story. One through the ballet, and the other, the movie plot. I remember this scene, where the lead male character, asks the ballerina, “Why do you want to dance?”, she fearlessly quickly answers with another question, “Why do you want to live?”
I only saw The Red Shoes, once, less than 30 years ago, but I still remember, that scene so well, as if I saw it yesterday. That was the scene, that changes the lead character, played by Moira Shearer, Victoria Page’s, life, in the movie. The ballet sequences were mesmerising, telling a beautifully epic tale of it’s own, and filmed so beautifully. My personal favourite was the one with raggedy clothes, portraying an exhausted ballerina, complimenting the frighteningly beautiful visual effects of the time. Eons before the evolution of CGI.

Scenes from War and Peace (1956)

Scenes from War and Peace (1956)

Scenes from War and Peace

Scenes from War and Peace

Audrey Hepburn in a scene from War and Peace

Audrey Hepburn in a scene from War and Peace

The next, was War and Peace, which I watched around the same time, more ‘cause I was already a great fan of Audrey Hepburn by then. A brilliant epic, adapted from Leo Tolstoy’s celebrated novel, War & Peace. With a stellar star cast, including Mel Ferrer, Henry Fonda, Audrey Hepburn, Jeremy Brett, May Britt and Anita Ekberg, this Hollywood adaptation, of a novel based on Napoleonic Wars, especially Napoleon’s invasion of Russia in 1812, happens to be amongst my favourite of epic scale war movies. And again, I recall, how brilliant the cinematography was. Of course the movie mainly focuses on complex relationship and personal maturation, of the three lead characters, and two aristocratic families, on the backdrop of the historical events of the Napoleonic invasion. I got to re-watch War and Peace, as an adult, just over a decade ago, whilst living in London. ’Twas  really worth it.

In the 90’s, as a teen, I watched Paul Czinner’s, As You Like It (1936). A pretty good movie adaptation of Shakespeare’s famed comedy. Jack Cardiff worked as a camera operator for this film, starring Laurence Olivier and Elisabeth Bergner. I enjoyed the movie, but I don’t recall much greatness, cinematography wise. Anyway, Cardiff wasn’t responsible for cinematography. Plus this happens to be a Black & White film, and Cardiff was famous for excelling in colourful epics.

Whilst living in Portsmouth, UK, 11 years ago, around this time, most probably to celebrate Jack Cardiff’s 90th Birthday (he was still alive then), one of the British channels, telecast, two of his movies. I already knew about both these films, and had heard about Cardiff. But it was that particular day, 11 years ago, that I got to know who Jack Cardiff was, after seeing these two films, which were shown one after another, that day. Black Narcissus and Under Capricorn. I loved the movie, and learnt a lot more about Cardiff, once I googled him out, back in 2004. And to see he was responsible for the magnificent cinematography, of my childhood films, The Red Shoes and War and Peace as well, was an added bonus. Since then, Cardiff happens to be my all time favourite cinematographer, of yesteryear.

Black Narcissus (3)

Scenes from Black Narcissus

Scenes from Black Narcissus (1947)

Scenes from Black Narcissus (1947)

Scenes from Black Narcissus (1947)

Cardiff’s work, on Black Narcissus, is undeniably the best I’ve seen till date. Set in the foothills of the Himalayas, near Darjeeling, India, and made as India was on the verge of getting their Independence from the British Raj, it’s another excellent movie, in every way possible, from the narrative, the brilliant cast, the setting, the cinematography, you name it. Starring Deborah Kerr, Jean Simmons (playing an Indian girl named ‘Kanchi’), Flora Robson, Kathleen Byron, David Farrar, Esmond Knight, Nancy Roberts and Sabu Dastagir, it’s a touching story of a group of Anglican nuns living in isolation, who have to ultimately, after being tragic victims of jealousy and lust, have to leave their peaceful life in India, under the British Empire. Jack Cardiff won his very first Oscar, for his beautiful creation of Black Narcissus, under the category, ‘Best Cinematography, Colour’. He was nominated for three more Oscars, twice for colour cinematography, and once for film direction, but never won. In 2001, he was awarded an honorary Oscar, as the ‘Master of light and colour’. Prior to that, in 1995, he was honoured with a lifetime achievement award, by the British Society of Cinematographers. And in Year 2000, Jack Cardiff was also awarded the OBE (Order of the British Empire).

Scene from Under Capricorn (1949), Down Under.

Scene from Under Capricorn (1949), Down Under!

Alfred Hitchcock’s Under Capricorn, is set Down Under, in the depths of the heat and dust of the Australian outback, i.e. Sydney of 1831, a town full of ex-convicts. Starring Joseph Cotten, Ingrid Bergman and Michael Wilding, the movie tells the story of how an Irish gentleman, who visits Australia, comes across his childhood friend, now a married woman, who’s suffering from alcohol abuse, and helplessly watches her decent into madness. Amazingly George Cukor’s Gaslight (1944), a superb piece of noir, too dealt with a married woman’s (played by Bergman as well) decent into madness, and Cotton played, a sympathiser, who saves her from her murderous husband, the man responsible for driving her insane. Under Capricorn, was Hitchcock’s second film made in Technicolor, after Rope (1948).

Death on the Nile (2)

Peter Ustinov as Hercule Poirot, with the Sphinx in the background, in Death on the Nile (1978)

Peter Ustinov as Hercule Poirot, with the Sphinx in the background, in Death on the Nile (1978)

Back then I also got to watch, Death on the Nile (1978), a very good adaptation of crime writer, Agatha Christie’s novel. Which was a really good movie, though not great. But again the cinematography capturing ancient Egyptian monuments was simply brilliant.

Scenes from Delhi (1938)

Scenes from Delhi (1938)

Scenes from Delhi (1938), in Connaught Place, New Delhi, India

Scenes from Delhi (1938), in Connaught Place, New Delhi, India.

Scenes from Delhi (1938)

Scenes from Delhi (1938)

Five years ago, I saw the documentary short film, Delhi (1938), online, on the BFI (British Film Institute) page, on the Youtube website. Another colourfully breathtaking insight of Old and New Delhi, of the 1930’s, showcasing the beautiful historic architecture, the modern wide roads, and Indian attire, of the period under the British Raj, and captured to perfection by Jack Cardiff. One of the best short documentaries I’ve seen, and this 10 minutes of reel is definitely worth checking out.

Caesar and Cleopatra (1)

Scenes from Caesar and Cleopatra (1945)

Scenes from Caesar and Cleopatra (1945)

Claude Rains, Vivien Leigh and Stewart Granger in a scene from Caesar and Cleopatra (1945), based on a play by George Bernard Shaw.

Claude Rains, Vivien Leigh and Stewart Granger in a scene from Caesar and Cleopatra (1945), based on a play by George Bernard Shaw.

Black & White still, with Claude Rains and Vivien Leigh, in the technicolor film, Caesar and Cleopatra

Black & White still, with Claude Rains and Vivien Leigh, in the technicolor film, Caesar and Cleopatra

Then there was Caesar and Cleopatra (1945), starring Claude Rains, Vivien Leigh and Stewart Granger. Another classic film with breathtaking cinematography, based on an acclaimed play by George Bernard Shaw. Yet, Caesar and Cleopatra, is no where near as great, as some of the other movies mentioned above (cinematography wise), but still it’s another excellent cinematic experience, altogether. I watched this online as well, on Youtube, a few years ago. Sadly that’s the last of Cardiff’s films I saw, and I don’t own a single. All these movies of his, in which he worked as a cinematographer, is no doubt worth, adding to my home library, collection of movies.

Cameraman - The Life and Work of Jack Cardiff (2010)

A documentary titled, Cameraman: The Life and Work of Jack Cardiff (2010), was released, five years ago. Being a great fan of Cardiff, am really keen on checking it out. It chronicles his career of over seventy years, as a cinematographer, reviews his magnificent work, and details how he ended up mastering the process of Technicolor in Cinema of a bygone era.

Besides being a maestro in cinematography, Cardiff was also a film director. But from his directorial ventures, I’ve only watched, to my memory, My Geisha (1962), starring Shirley MacLaine, Yves Montand, Edward G. Robinson and Robert Cummings. That too, I watched, back in the 1980’s. My Geisha, was a hilarious comedy about an actress, Lucy Dell (MacLaine), who disguises herself as a Japanese Geisha, to bag the lead role, unaware to her husband (Montand), in her husbands new directorial venture, inspired by Giacomo Puccini’s, renowned Opera, Madame Butterfly.

Some of Jack Cardiff's directorial ventures, Sons and Lovers (1960), My Geisha (1962) and The Girl on a Motorcycle (1968).

Some of Jack Cardiff’s directorial ventures: Sons and Lovers (1960), My Geisha (1962) and The Girl on a Motorcycle (1968).

Being a fan of D.H. Lawrence, I’d really love to watch Cardiff’s adaptation of Sons and Lovers (1960), starring Trevor Howard, Dean Stockwell, Wendy Hiller and Mary Ure. Sons and Lovers, was Cardiff ’s very first nomination, for the ‘Best Director’ Oscar. Ironically it won one Oscar, for ‘Best Cinematography, Black-and-White’, for which he wasn’t responsible for. From Cardiff’s other works as a cinematographer, am really keen on watching, The African Queen (1951), Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn, The Prince and the Showgirl (1957), with Laurence Olivier and Marilyn Monroe, and Crossed Swords (1977), with Oliver Reed, George C. Scott, Rex Harrison, David Hemmings and Mark Lester, to name a few.

All of Cardiff’s works I mentioned here as a cinematographer, are excellent films as a whole, except for Under Capricorn and Death in the Nile. Alfred Hitchcock’s Under Capricorn, is not necessarily Hitchcock’s best film, yet it’s still a near excellent noir flick. And John Guillermin’s adaptation of Agatha Christie’s famed novel, Death in the Nile, though not the best adaptation of one of her novels, is still a very good crime movie.

In memory of Jack Cardiff (1914 – 2009), who shall forever be remembered for his masterworks in colour, especially at a time, when colour movies were a rarity, back in the 1930’s & 40’s. I’d love to watch more of his cinematic wonders, be it as a cinematographer, or a film director.

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense
Nuwan Sen’s ART Sense

Been tweeting for a whole year now. Time sure flies.
I’ve been tweeting about films, Birthdays, anniversaries, travel, news you name it. But most of all, I’ve been tweeting quotes. No, not quotes by famous personalities, but my own. Making up my own quotes, from my own life experiences. My Copyright  🙂

Thus, today being the 1st anniversary of my Twitter account, I thought I’d share some of my (not yet famous) quotes with my fellow bloggers.

If anyone wants to re-quote me, you are more than welcome.
Plus most of you blog-pals, I’ve been following on twitter, and vice versa. But if there is anyone else whose twitter account I’ve missed out on, do follow me at NuwanSen@Nuwansenfilmsen, and I shall definitely follow you back, ASAP.

Cheers
Nuwan Sen
Tweeting To’ Tweet

Kill Your Darlings (2013) is based on the real life account, involving some of the famed poets from the Beat Generation, including Jack Kerouac, William Burroughs and Allen Ginsberg, before they became famous.
Kill Your Darlings Blog HeaderThe Beats before The Beats
Before Allen Ginsberg became one of the greatest literary geniuses to have existed in America, in the previous century, he was just a geeky young student at Colombia University. Yet appearances aside, young Ginsberg got into all kinds of mischief, along with his group of friends, during his university years, in the 1940’s. Set a decade before the literary revolution of the Beat Generation, this group of misfits included his contemporaries, fellow poets, Jack Kerouac and William Burroughs. Unfortunately, all three of them were roped into, being indirectly involved in, a murder of a poet (a college Professor), who never got a chance to become famous for his intellect, but rather for the way he was killed, and made infamous as a sexual predator, just because he was gay. The murderer was released after two years, on the grounds that it was an ‘‘Honour Slaying’’, from forced homosexual advances, and that the murderer acted upon self-defence.

Kill Your Darlings, reminded me of some great films based on rebellious students, set in strict institutes. The likes of, A Yank at Oxford (1938), Mona Lisa Smile (2003), 3 Idiots (2009); and coming-of-age films like; To Sir, with Love (1967), Dead Poets Society (1989); which was actually set during the height of the Beat Generation, i.e. the 1950’s; School Ties (1992); which too was set in 50’s; Dangerous Minds (1995), The Dangerous Lives of Altar Boys (2002) and The History Boys (2006), to name some, out of many. While, like Kill Your Darlings; A Yank at Oxford, Mona Lisa Smile and 3 Idiots; are to do with college students, the rest of the films mentioned here are set in high school. But what’s common about these movies; either based on actual events, or out and out fiction; is the fact that it deals with anti-establishment, and ironically, as well as trying to fit in. These films are about youngsters (and sometimes adults/teachers as well), who can think for themselves; with a brain of their own; yet sometimes shy intellects take time to come out of their shell. And when they do, they fear nothing.

But that’s where the similarities end. For none of these films mentioned above, has a violent crime taking place. This is where Kill Your Darlings differs, and it’s based on an actual real life incident. While tragic deaths are seen in a few of movies mentioned here; either through suicide or accident; none of them result in murder. Thus this movie, ends up being a fusion of very varied genres, including, a crime drama, a love story (love triangle), a thriller, plus a biographical film, all roped into one. Yet the movie is less of a historical film, about the poets, that made them the famed Beats, and more to do with the love-triangle, that leads to a notorious tragedy the Beats unfortunately were associated with, during their college years.

LEFT: Allen Ginsberg  RIGHT: Daniel Radcliffe as Allen Ginsberg in the movie

LEFT: Allen Ginsberg
RIGHT: Daniel Radcliffe as Allen Ginsberg in the movie

Daniel Radcliffe as Allen Ginsberg, leads the cast, with Dane DeHaan (as Lucien Carr), Jack Huston (as Jack Kerouac), Ben Foster (as William Burroughs) and Michael C. Hall (as David Kammerer); making up the group of friends (and two secret lovers within) and academics, living in New York, far away from the battle fields of Europe, during the Second World War. Three of the friends from this group are students at Columbia University. The whole cast is superb in their respective roles. Interesting to note that the lead character here, portraying the famous American poet of the 20th Century, was actually played by a British born actor. And he did a remarkable job of it.

Radcliffe was spot-on, as Ginsberg. On the home front; we see his troubled life as a youngster, taking care of his deranged mother suffering from a mental illness that was never properly diagnosed; and his father’s indifference to it, and later dealing with his father’s new girlfriend while his mother is being treated at a mental hospital. In college, his seduction and psychological manipulation, at the hands of Lucien Carr, who uses Ginsberg, as he uses everyone in his life, including his secret, older, lover, David Kammerer. Kammerer was in his late 20’s when he met Carr, and Carr was still a young boy aged 14. Soon they started having an affair. Though, Kammerer was wrong to do so, as it would seem as a paedophiliac act on his part; he was genuinely in love with Carr. Carr too was in love with Kammerer, but couldn’t accept it himself, for the older he got, he used men who fell in love with him, to get things done for himself. In his college years, Carr got Kammerer to do his homework for him, and later Carr did the same with Ginsberg. Young Ginsberg was really innocent, thus suffered due to his affection towards Carr. And Kammerer suffered because he could not let go of his love for a man (by the now an adult Carr) who felt the same, but was ashamed to admit it. This shame Carr felt, resulted in him committing a crime in one of the most unspeakable ways possible. The movie begins with this said crime, filmed beautifully, by director John Krokidas, in his debut feature film. The camera zooms onto a half-naked, bloodstained body of actor Dane DeHaan, submerged to the waist in water, carrying a bloodied dead body in his arms. The scene is pure artistic, poetic (in)justice, depicting love, sex and death; a hint of what’s to come; intercut with a verbal clash between DeHaan and Radcliffe, on either side of the prison bars. And the title thrown, one word at a time, in quick succession, onto the screen – ‘KILL’ ‘YOUR’ ‘DARLINGS’. Beautifully made, by a director, whose future creations, am really looking forward to watching.

A superb representation of, 3 Conflicted Souls (Allen Ginsberg, Lucien Carr and David Kammerer); among 4 Poets (Allen Ginsberg, Jack Kerouac, William Burroughs and David Kammerer), who made up a group of 5 friends, (Allen Ginsberg, Lucien Carr, Jack Kerouac, William Burroughs and David Kammerer), including a love triangle, Ginsberg was part of, among 2 secret lovers (Lucien Carr and David Kammerer).

A Love Story with India: The real-life Allen Ginsberg in India, with friends, during his various visits to India.

A Love Story with India: The real-life Allen Ginsberg in India, with friends, during his various visits to India.

Allen Ginsberg, among the famed giants of modern American literature; coined in as The Beat Generation, of the 1950’s; has been portrayed by many a actors, from George Netesky (in 1970), to Ron Rifkin (1987), to David Markey (89’), to John Turturro (99’), to Ron Livingston (00’), to David Cross in I’m Not There. (2007); and more recently; James Franco (10’), Tom Sturridge (12’) & now of course Radcliffe. Besides Radcliffe’s brilliant performance, the only other cinematic version of Ginsberg I’ve seen, is that of Cross in I’m Not There., and that too, I hardly remember Cross’ role, in that excellent Bob Dylan bio-pic, where varied incarnations of Dylan were portrayed by a potpourri of six different actors. Incidentally, David Cross, who starred as Allen Ginsberg in I’m Not There., also appears in Kill Your Darlings, this time as Ginsberg’s father, Louis Ginsberg (a published poet himself, though not a renowned one, like his son ended up being).

Interesting fact: Ginsberg was a practicing Jewish Buddhist (Jubu) by choice, since 1950 (in his early 20’s), until his death in 1997. A Jubu, is a Jewish person who practices Buddhism, without denouncing ones own faith.

Radcliffe & I
Back 2007, whilst living in Sydney, I managed to watch most of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone (2001), when it was telecast in a local channel down under. Prior to that, when Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone was released in 2001, I wasn’t that keen on the ‘Harry Potter’ series of films, as it was a series of children’s fantasy films. But since living in England (2002 – 2005), I had heard such good things about it, that when it was shown on the small screen, in Sydney, in 07’; as a true film buff; I decided to give it go. Though I didn’t get to see the finalé of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, I felt it was a superb children’s movie, to come out in the 21st century. Around the same time, Daniel Radcliffe actually came to Sydney, to star in the Oz movie, December Boys (2007). And he came on the TV show, Rove (2007 – 2009), hosted by Rove McManus. I don’t remember whether I saw Radcliffe live on Rove first, or on Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, whilst living in Australia. Most probably on Rove. I automatically liked Radcliffe’s, down to earth, friendly persona; ‘twas a fun interview. When Radcliffe was asked who he’d turn gay for (a question Rove McManus asks all the celebs he interviews, including when he interviewed, Kevin Rudd, the then, soon to be, Prime Minister of Australia), Radcliffe answered ‘Albert Einstein’. Smart answer! Nobody on Rove had ever come up with a non-sex-appeal, intellectual, personality’s name; as a person he/she would go gay for; at least not in the episodes I ever saw. In the same episode, Nikki Blonsky and Zac Efron appeared as well, to promote the musical, Hairspray (2007). Although I don’t recall, Nikki Blonsky’s answer, I remember that Efron didn’t answer the, ‘who he’d turn gay for ’, question, and sat there tight lipped. Which seemed pretty rude. But none the less, an interesting show; with Radcliffe’s knee length socks (discovered when he was asked about his hairy legs), contrasting to Efron’s sockless feet, and Radcliffe’s well timed gulp, all roped into the show’s jokes; making that episode of Rove, a very jovial experience. I never got to watch December Boys, but did enjoy watching Hairspray back then (guilty pleasure  😉 ).

The Cast of Kill Your Darlings (2013), with the Director of the film. (L-R)  Jack Huston, Michael C. Hall, Dane DeHaan, Daniel Radcliffe & Ben Foster; carrying Film Director, John Krokidas, in their arms.

The Cast of Kill Your Darlings (2013), with the Director of the film.
(L-R) Jack Huston, Michael C. Hall, Dane DeHaan, Daniel Radcliffe & Ben Foster; carrying Film Director, John Krokidas, in their arms.

Some years prior to my brush with Rove & Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone (in Sydney 07’), I had actually watched The Tailor of Panama (2001); a pretty good movie, with Pierce Brosnan, Geoffrey Rush and Jamie Lee Curtis; which apparently also starred the little Radcliffe. But to be quite honest I don’t remember him in it at all. In 2007, he also came in the latest stage adaptation of the famous play by Peter Shaffer, Equus. It was all over the newspapers, Down Under. I’d have loved to watch that. I’ve seen the excellent, 1977, Sidney Lumet directed, movie adaptation of Equus, starring Richard Burton and Peter Firth. One of my favourite Lumet creations of the Big Screen (see my post Sidney Lumet & His Films from last year, June 2014, plus my Set of Seven on IMDB, from April 2011).

Post that, back in SL, around five years ago, I rented the DVD (unfortunately a pirated copy, pretty bad quality, and the only kind of DVD’s that can be found all over here; and I hate pirated DVD’s, thus I do buy good original films, when and if, I do go abroad – Europe, India & Australia) of Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (2009). Thus that’s the only complete ‘Harry Potter’ film I’ve seen till date, and I felt it was a pretty good movie, though not as great as the hype surrounding the franchise. Then in February/March 2012, I was in New Delhi, India, and saw The Woman in Black (2012), starring Daniel Radcliffe, on the Big Screen there. The film was pretty pathetic (see my list of critiques titled Oscar Winners … and then some 2012 from March 2012, on IMDB), with the only saving grace being Radcliffe’s superb performance. He was brilliant, in such a mature role, as a father and a widower. I already liked his personality, when I saw him on Rove, back in 2007, and when I saw him in The Woman in Black; though a pretty bad movie; by now I had even greater respect for him, as an actor. Since then, I haven’t seen any of his films, until I saw Kill Your Darlings.

Kill Your Darlings Blog Bottom - Poster

I watched Kill Your Darlings, last week, on the 22nd of July, 2015, when it was shown at the Goethe Institute (German Cultural Centre), here. Daniel Radcliffe celebrated his 26th Birthday on the 23rd of July, 2015.

Kill Your Darlings (2013) – A Must Watch!!!!!
My Rating: Near Excellence!!!! 9/10!!!!!

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense

3 years . 3 months . 3 weeks . 3 days

Bastille Day 2015 Header

3 years, 3 months, 3 weeks & 3 days; that’s exactly how old my Blog is today. I started this Blog on the 20th of March, Year 2012. Today is also Bastille Day, i.e. the National Day of France. So I thought, why not do something different today, that is relevant to both, my Blog, and the French republic, the largest country, in the western region, of the European continent.

So here is my foursome of 3’s (my favourites in each) in relation to this beautiful country, called France.

1st 3.
My trio of favourite hangouts in Paris
I first visited Paris, during my hectic one month Eurotrip of Spring 2005 (April 2005). Spent just one evening in Paris, at the time. Later I got a chance to live there, for almost a year, in 2008 & 2009. I fell deeply in love with the City of Love, the most beautiful concrete jungle I’ve ever lived in.

(i)  The Champs-Élysées

Watching the Bastille Day parade, Bastille Day ((14th July 2008) The Champs-Élysées, Paris

Watching the Bastille Day parade, On Bastille Day (14th July 2008)
Champs-Élysées, Paris

At the Virgin Bookshop  (an Old underground bank vault that has been turned into a bookstore) Champs-Élysées, Paris (August 2009)

At the Virgin Bookshop (an Old underground bank vault, that has been turned into a bookstore) Champs-Élysées, Paris (August 2009)

With a French friend (I befriended in Sydney), in front of one of the Gaumont cinemas, at the Champs-Élysées, in Paris (8th September 2009) The night before I let Paris, France. Haven't returned since.

With a French friend (I befriended in Sydney, Australia), in front of one of the Gaumont cinemas, at the Champs-Élysées, in Paris (8th September 2009)
The night before I left Paris, France. Haven’t returned since.

I loved hanging out around the Champs-Élysées, such a beautiful location, with it’s wide walkways, lined up with trees, leading up to the Arc de Triomphe. Especially being a film buff I was a frequent visitor to the Champs-Élysées, whilst living in Paris, for there are two Gaumont Cinemas, on either side of the broad boulevard. Got to watch some great European & Hollywood films. I went to the cinemas near the Palais Garnier (Opera House), as well. Another beautiful spot, with the Opera House, and the Galeries Lafayette (a posh department store) et al. But I love the whole atmosphere, and the feel, with the hustle and bustle of the walkways, of the Champs-Élysées. On 14th July 2008, I went to watch the Bastille Day parade, at the Champs-Élysées as well.

(ii) Along the River Seine

Along the River Seine, Paris (September 2008)

Along the River Seine, Paris (September 2008)

Along the River Seine, in Paris (August 2009)

Along the River Seine, in Paris (August 2009)

Along the River Seine, Paris (August 2009)

Along the River Seine, Paris (August 2009)

Being a romantic at heart, I can just lose myself walking along the River Seine. It’s just so beautiful, with all those old bridges, ancient brick roads, aesthetically appealing historic architecture, on either side of the river, passing tiny avenues, and the old street vendors, selling old books and souvenirs of Paris, and the fresh clean air. Best to walk alone along these streets, to enjoy oneself. Just get lost in yourself, it’s Poetic Justice, in a positive sense, that is. It’s pure heaven!!!!!

(iii) The Louvre

At the Egyptian Gallery The Louvre, Paris (July 2008)

At the Egyptian Gallery
Louvre, Paris (July 2008)

Under the Glass Pyramid  With my sister, and her husband, when they visited Paris (Spring 2009) The Louvre, Paris (April 2009)

Under the Glass Pyramid
With my sister, and her husband, when they visited Paris (Spring 2009)
Louvre, Paris (April 2009)

With a self-portrait of Eugène Delacroix Louvre, in Paris (May 2009)

With a self-portrait of Eugène Delacroix
Louvre, in Paris (May 2009)

Being an artist as well, I’ve visited this famous museum only four times (it’s free every first Sunday of the month). And yet I never got a chance to complete every nook and corner of this beautiful building, in itself, not to mention, the well maintained, collection of art work from around the globe. The Louvre is my second favourite, yet most visited, Museum in the French capital. My favourite museum happens to be Musée d’Orsay, but I’ve only visited it twice. And I’ve visited other various Art Galleries and Museums in Paris as well. Thus, not just the Louvre, but I can say that the Parisienne museums in the general sense, could be another great hangout, but it’s specifically the Louvre, I enjoyed hanging out in the most, even though I love the Musée d’Orsay more.

2nd 3.
My trio of all time favourite French Films

(i) Jules et Jim (1962)
Jules et Jim (Special Post on France) 3-3-3-3 Photographic PosterMy all time favourite piece of French cinema. Directed by François Truffaut, and starring Jeanne Moreau, Oskar Werner, and Henri Serre, this French New Wave classic, is also among my TOP-10 all time favourite movies. An epic saga spanning over 3 decades, happens to be one of my favourite tragic romances ever. Truffaut was a genius. An excellent love triangle, involving two best friends (an Austrian & a Frenchman), both of whom fall for the same French beauty, with a serene looking smile.
Also see my lists The Essential 60’s (Top 60) (pictorial tribute) and Why I love …. (list of critiques), from January 2012, and November/December 2012, respectively, on IMDB.

(ii) Les Enfants du Paradis (1945)
Les Enfants du ParadisOne of the most beautiful epics ever made. Les Enfants du Paradis, directed by Marcel Carné, made with great difficulty during the second World War, and set in the backdrop of the French Theatre during the 19th century, is France’s answer to America’s Gone with the Wind (1939).
Also see my post Children of Paradise: The French Epic from last year (July 2014).

(iii) Les Parapluies de Cherbourg (1964)
Les Parapluies de CherbourgOne of my favourite musicals ever. Directed by Jacques Demy, this romantic 60’s movie, set in the late 50’s, is about a young unmarried pregnant girl, separated from her lover (who’s gone to fight for the French, during the Algerian war), having no news of his whereabouts, she has to come to a crucial decision for the wellbeing of her unborn child. Love this classic. Love Catherine Deneuve!!!!
Also see my post Being mesmerised by ‘The Umbrellas of Cherbourg from August 2013.

3rd 3
My trio of favourite holiday destinations, in France (outside Paris)

(i) The French Riviera (Côte d’Azur)

Beaulieu-sur-mer, South of France  (July 2009)

Beaulieu-sur-mer, South of France (July 2009)

Beaulieu-sur-mer, South of France (July 2009) On the way to Monaco

Beaulieu-sur-mer, South of France (July 2009)
On the way to Monaco

On Bastille Day (14th July 2009) Villefranche-sur-mer, South Of France

On Bastille Day (14th July 2009)
Villefranche-sur-mer, South Of France

Of course, the most beautiful warm holiday resort I’ve ever been to. With it’s rocky mountains, pebbled beaches and luxurious backdrops, the French Riviera is a class apart. Very expensive though, I practically starved. But unlike Paris, where I loved living in, I cannot see myself residing in the Côte d’Azur. I’ll miss the city too much. But it’s no doubt a perfect holiday resort, to take some time off, and just chill. Next time, if and when, I get a chance to visit the south of France again, I should have a load of money saved up, so that I don’t end up poverty ridden by the end of it.

(ii) Le Mont Saint-Michel

Mont St. Michel, Normandy (September 2008)

Mont St. Michel, Normandy (September 2008)

In front of the chapel, on top of Mont St. Michel, in Normandy (September 2008)

In front of the Chapel, on top of Mont St. Michel, in Normandy (September 2008)

Inside Mont St. Michel, Normandy (September 2008)

Inside Mont St. Michel, Normandy (September 2008)

Off the northern coast of France, in Normandy, is an island entirely made up of a steep granite hill, with a black clay based beach, surrounding it. One of the most beautiful ancient citadels I’ve ever visited. Mont St. Michel, is part of the UNESCO list of World Heritage Sites.

(iii) Giverny

Claude Monet's Garden  Giverny, France (August 2008)

Claude Monet’s Garden
Giverny, N. France (August 2008)

Claude Monet's Home & Gardens Giverny, N. France (August 2008)

Claude Monet’s Home & Gardens
Giverny, N. France (August 2008)

With a Classic Sports Car Giverny, N. France (August 2008)

With a Classic Sports Car
Giverny, N. France (August 2008)

Being an artist, how can I not mention Giverny, where the late Impressionist Artist, of the 19th & early 20th century, Claude Monet’s, house and gardens are located. A must see for any artist, florist and anyone with a sense, or even a tiny streak, of artistry, in them. Also a must see for artists, are Monet’s paintings housed at the Musée d’Orsay (mentioned earlier) – an old railway station, that existed from the beginning of the 20th century up to the late 1930’s, and transformed into, primarily, an impressionist Art Gallery, in Paris, in the 1980’s

Last (4th) 3.
My trio of favourite, French born, French film stars

(i) Catherine Deneuve
Catherine DeneuveBeen a fan of hers, since like ever. This 71 year old actress is no doubt my all time favourite French celebrity. Having started her cinematic journey in the late 50’s, Deneuve had two film releases this year, and has no plans of retiring from the film industry, any time soon.

(ii) Alain Delon
Alain DelonI first discovered the existence of Alain Delon, at the turn of the century. Since then have seen quite a lot of, this 79 year old star’s, great movies; and have loved him, in everything I’ve seen him in. But I haven’t really watched any of his movies, he’s acted in, in his old age. His last film appearance, so far, was in 2012.

(iii) Marion Cotillard
Marion Cotillard (Special Post on France) 3-3-3-3Back in 2007, whilst living in Sydney, I watched the film Love Me If You Dare (2003), when it was shown on a local channel there. I thought she looked beautiful, and she was a good actress, and the film was really good as well, and that was that. Then mid-2007, the Édith Piaf bio-pic, La Vie en Rose (2007), starring Marion Cotillard, in the lead, as Piaf, was released, in Australia. I went to watch it, ‘cause I’ve been a fan of Édith Piaf’s beautiful song, ever since I watched Audrey Hepburn’s rendition of Piaf’s La Vie en Rose in Sabrina (1954), when I was a teenager, back in 1994, whilst living in New Delhi, India. By the turn of this century, I was aware who Édith Piaf was. Thus Piaf was my motivation behind watching La Vie en Rose, and not Cotillard. But Cotillard did such a brilliant job, she was Piaf incarnate. I was instantly hooked by her brilliant performance, and Cotillard became my favourite French movie star from 21st century. Born in 1975, she’s my age, practically (she’ll turn 40 later, in September, this year). At the Oscars, in 2008, she bagged the ‘Best Actress’ trophy for her role in La Vie en Rose. Returning home from work, I just managed to switch on the television to see her name being announced as that year’s winner. I was delighted. And since then I’ve see quite a few of her movies, both from France and Hollywood. Am really keen on checking out her most recent, British venture, Macbeth (2015), where she plays Lady Macbeth, and which was released at the Cannes Festival a couple of months ago (May 2015). Also see my write-up, paying tribute to Édith Piaf, Édith Piaf: 50th Death Anniversary, from a couple of years ago.

So here you are, my foursome of 3’s, honouring my 3 years, 3 months, 3 weeks & 3 days, of blogging, till date, as well the French National day, in my own way.

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense
Nuwan Sen’s Historical Sense
Nuwan Sen and the French Republic

 

World Population Day

One of the first things that comes to mind, when I hear the words, World Population Day, is – India & China (the two most populated countries in the world).

Mother India has an estimate population of 1,273,960,000, whilst Mama China has an even larger estimated population of 1,370,880,000 inhabitants.
Pregnant Map of IndiaThough am not an Indian, as I was born in New Delhi, India; and spent my entire childhood (from birth to 12½), then one year of teenage life (18½ to 19½) in (the best year of my teenage life), and my three years at Delhi University (KMC in North Campus), and my nightmare acting school days, at Imago Acting school (the worst few months of my life, ever; where, added to which, I found out, that I can’t act for peanuts), @ Film City, in Noida (a suburb of New Delhi, located in the state of Uttar Pradesh), India; and as I’ve never even visited China yet, let alone live there, I shall focus entirely on India, for this post.

India is beautiful country, to visit, and if you are well to do, to live in. Yet, this third world country, is sadly amongst the poorest countries in the world. With a massive population, poverty is something that’s impossible to completely eradicate. But India does try it’s best, and it’s a country that constantly moves forward, economically and otherwise. Why, if you take certain areas, in cities, like New Delhi, for instance, it is like a first world country. If India were a tiny island, with a small population, it would no doubt, like the country of Singapore, have been one the famed first world countries of the east. But, unfortunately that’s not the case. And then there is also a lot corruption in such a beautiful, historically and aesthetically significant, country. Yet, again, it doesn’t mean the whole country is, nor that the majority of the population is, involved in corruption. There might be thousands and thousands of Indians involved in deceit, bribery, fraud, you name it; but there are millions and millions who aren’t, out of a society of over a billion inhabitants, packed together in one country.

How can one help solve the population crisis, India is going through. With the United States recent referendum that finally acknowledged same-sex marriage, by legalising it nationwide, in the States; India, for one, should seriously re-think their laws on homosexuality. Why, India is one country, that ought to, not just give recognition to LGBT communities, but promote homosexually 😉 . For one thing, that will naturally solve the population crisis of the country, quicker than a blink of an eye. Ha!!

That was just in jest, but in a more serious note, India needs to be more open minded. Not just in gay and lesbian issues, but in everything, from race, religion to gender (especially women’s issues). Thankfully, to a certain extent, people in most Indian cities, do tend to be quite open minded. Compulsory education throughout the country, should be one of the main priorities, a perfect pathway to improve and curb the ever increasing inhabitants, that’s getting too heavy for Mother India to keep tabs on. Jawaharlal Nehru, the first Prime Minister of independent India, advocated Adult education centres, especially in rural areas, back in the 1950’s, besides his other social policies concerning higher education, as well as compulsory children’s primary education, at the time. Yet, it’s not implemented today.

There’ve been great Indian personalities, who’ve manage to bring the country forward despite everything. From the 70’s, till date, feminist/social activists, like actress Shabana Azmi, Deepti Naval and the late Smita Patil, to historian Romila Thapar, to politicians like Indira Gandhi (and her two daughter-in-laws – Sonia Gandhi & Maneka Gandhi) and have constantly thrived to bring awareness to various social issues concerning India. Shabana Azmi (with a background in psychology) is also a Goodwill Ambassador of the United Nations Population Fund (UNPFA), which seeks to spread contraception and abortion in India, in order to limit it’s population. In the mid-1980’s, Doordarshan showcased a television soap, Rajani (1985-1986), the protagonist of which, a housewife, would fight injustices, creating social awareness, amongst, it’s other various ignorant characters, as well as us, it’s audiences. As kids, we really enjoyed watching this television series. More recently, the Aamir Khan hosted talk show, Satyamev Jayate (2012-2014), a show that focused on social issues affecting modern day Indians, reached audiences beyond the Indian sub-continent, as it was aired on various channels within STAR cable network as well as Doordarshan’s DD National channel.

Miss Universe , Sushmita Sen, the first Indian beauty queen to be crowned Miss India, never married, adopted two children, both girls (Sen adopted her first child, a baby, at the young age of 25), and, along with actress Kajol, has campaigned to save the girl child/empower the girl child (which by many a illiterate, rich or poor, have considered a burden). Actress, Kajol, is a social activist herself, and is noted for her work with widows and children. Adoption is truly one of best options, than giving birth to a child, which should somewhat help curb the ever increasing Indian population as well. There are so many unwanted children in the world. You’d be saving a life, and helping another human being, rather than producing one, where there are so many abandoned. It’s not a necessity, that a child has to come from your semen/ovary/womb. I personally would have loved to adopt a child myself. But after leading a very unsettling, and quite miserable, life, in a very narrow minded country like Sri Lanka, for the last six years, and being a single, unmarried, inexperienced, male, it is impossible to even think of adoption here. I ended up adopting a dog, in December 2014, instead. Jokes apart, that’s the best thing that’s happened to my life. And the puppy I adopted, was a stray (supposedly a mixed breed, mixed with a stray, and abandoned on the streets to die). Thus I actually saved a life. Otherwise, if she didn’t find a home, she might have ended up, god knows where. Saving a stray animal, is still saving a life.

Educating villagers, the need for sterilisation, is another method. In 1977, the then Indian Prime Minister, the late Indira Gandhi, became unpopular for the notorious ‘Compulsory Sterilisation Program’ of  1976, and lost the elections of 77’. This sterilisation program was actually the brainchild of her younger son, the late Sanjay Gandhi. It was a forced form of sterilisation, and not by choice, during India’s state of Emergency (75’ – 77’). Added to which, it focused more on sterilising women than men. The way it happened was wrong, but it could have helped limit the number of unwanted, unplanned, births, at the time. None the less, it was a negative use of power, by a greatly respected premier. Everyone makes mistakes. What should be done, is that villagers should be made to understand, and re-educated, as to why sterilisation and contraception’s, are a necessity, after giving birth to a one or two children (three or more is a crowd, unless they are adopted 😀 ).

Indian Art House movies, especially Hindi-language films, mostly produced by NFDC (National Film Development Corporation of India) like, Ankur (1974), Manthan – The Churning (1976), Mirch Masala (1987), Salaam Bombay! (1988), and especially the educational movie directed by Shyam Benegal, Hari-Bhari (2000), starring Shabana Azmi, Rajit Kapoor, Nandita Das and Rajeshwari Sachdev, which dealt with women’s fertility rights, have been helpfully insightful cinematic ventures in India. This is the kind of cinema, that the media can use, to help educate villagers around India. Hari-Bhari won the National Film Award for ‘Best Film on Family Welfare’.

Today, the Jansankhya Sthirata Kosh (JSK), a registered society of the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, under the Government of India, is doing every effort to draw attention towards issues of Population Stabilisation. And a Walkathon towards Population Stabilization, is organised for today, 11th of July, 2015, at the India Gate, in New Delhi, India.

Today is World Population Day. Let’s help curb unwanted births, especially in poorer countries, through, education, adoption and in any small way we can possibly help.

Nuwan Sen n’ Social Issues
Nuwan Sen’s Historical Sense

Turning 40

Millennium Year: Me aged 24 (From my Modeling Portfolio  (February 2000)) New Delhi, India

Millennium Year: Me aged 24 (From my Modeling Portfolio (Winter of February 2000)) New Delhi, India

Staring off with me me me (moi, mé) & I .
I turned 40 on the 22nd of June, 2015!!!!!

A look back, at me myself, through pictures
(40 photographs from my life, till now, including the one above).
Pure Vanity eh!!  🙂

Me aged 2 (February 1978) Garden belonging to our residential  complex (Asia House Flats) New Delhi, India

Me aged 2 (Winter of February 1978), In the Garden belonging to our residential complex (Asia House Flats) New Delhi, India

On my 3rd Birthday (22nd June 1978), At Home (Asia House Flats) New Delhi, India Celebrating/Birthday Party!!!

On my 3rd Birthday (Summer: 22nd June 1978), At Home (Asia House Flats) New Delhi, India
Celebrating/Birthday Party!!!

On my 5th Birthday (Summer: 22nd June 1980) at Home, Asia House Flats, New Delhi, India Celebrating/Birthday Party

On my 5th Birthday (Summer: 22nd June 1980), At Home, Asia House Flats, New Delhi, India
Celebrating/Birthday Party

Aged 9 (January 1985) On Holiday in Sri Lanka (for my maternal Uncle's wedding)

Aged 9 (January 1985), On Holiday in Sri Lanka (for my maternal Uncle’s wedding)

Me aged 12 (June 1987) Bombay, India (On Holiday - My first holiday away from my parents & baby sister)

Me aged 12 (School Summer Holidays: June 1987), In Bombay, India (On Holiday – My first holiday away from my parents & baby sister) Visited Bombay soon after my 12th Birthday

SWEET SIXTEEN: On my 16th Birthday (22nd JUNE 1991), At home 56, Siripura (SL) Just a  Family Gathering.

SWEET SIXTEEN: On my 16th Birthday (22nd JUNE 1991), At home 56, Siripura (SL) Just a
Family Gathering

Me aged 17 (92') At Home, 56,Siripura (SL)

Me aged 17 (92′), At Home, 56, Siripura (SL)

Me aged 18 (December 1993), At Home - 56 Siripura (SL)

Me aged 18 (December 1993), At Home – 56, Siripura (SL)

Me aged 18 (January 1994, B/W (SL) & the Winter of February 1994, Colour (in New Delhi, India)

Me aged 18 (January 1994, B/W (SL) & the Winter of February 1994, Colour (in New Delhi, India))

On my 20th Birthday (22nd June 1995), At Home 56, Siripura (SL) Just an ordinary day!!!!!

On my 20th Birthday (22nd June 1995), At Home 56, Siripura (SL)
Just an ordinary day!!!!!

Aged 20 (95'), At Home, 56, Siripura (SL)

Aged 20 (95′), At Home, 56, Siripura (SL)

Me aged 20 (1995), At Home, 56, Siripura (SL)

Me aged 20 (1995), At Home, 56, Siripura (SL)

Aged 21 (October 1996) Pokhara, Nepal (On Holiday - During the short Autumn break (Delhi University years))

Aged 21 (October 1996), In Pokhara, Nepal (On Holiday – During the short Autumn break (Delhi University years))

Aged 21 (October 1996) Sarangkot, Pokhara, Nepal - with Sunrise falling on Mount Machhapuchchhre (a.k.a. Mt. Fishtail) in the background, early morning (On Holiday in Nepal during the University Autumn break)

Me aged 21 (October 1996), At Sarangkot, Pokhara, Nepal – with Sunrise falling on Mount Machhapuchchhre (a.k.a. Mt. Fishtail) in the background, early morning (On Holiday in Nepal during the University Autumn break (DU years))

Aged 21 (Winter of November 1996), At Home away from home - the co-rented two-room student flatlet, during my Delhi University years, at Hudson Lines (New Delhi, India)

Aged 21 (Winter of November 1996), At Home – away from home – the co-rented two-room student flatlet, during my Delhi University years, at Hudson Lines (New Delhi, India)

Me aged 21 (Winter of January 1997), In front of Rashtrapati Bhavan (Official Presidential Residence), New Delhi, India (DU years)

Me aged 21 (During the Winter Vacation of January 1997), In front of the main entrance to the Rashtrapati Bhavan (Official Presidential Residence), New Delhi, India (DU years)

Me aged 22 (October 1997) Ajanta Caves, Aurangabad district of the state of Maharashtra, India (During the short Autumn break DU years)

Me aged 22 (October 1997), At Ajanta Caves, Aurangabad district of the state of Maharashtra, India (During the short Autumn break – DU years)

Me aged 22 (October 1997), In Goa (During the Autumn break - DU years)

Me aged 22 (October 1997), In Goa, India (During the Autumn break – DU years)

Aged 22 (October 1997), In Goa, India (During the Autumn break - DU years)

Aged 22 (October 1997), In Goa, India (During the University Autumn break – DU years)

Me aged 24 - From my Modeling Portfolio (Winter of February 2000) New Delhi, India

Me aged 24 (From my Modeling Portfolio (Winter of February 2000)) New Delhi, India

Me aged 24 (From my Modeling Portfolio (Winter of February 2000)) New Delhi, India

Me aged 24 (From my Modeling Portfolio (Winter of February 2000)) New Delhi, India

Aged 24 (From my Modeling Portfolio (Winter of February 2000)) New Delhi, India

Aged 24 (From my Modeling Portfolio (Winter of February 2000)) New Delhi, India

Fashion n' Style: Me aged 24 (From my Modeling Portfolio (Winter of February 2000)) New Delhi, India

Fashion n’ Style: Me aged 24 (From my Modeling Portfolio (Winter of February 2000)) New Delhi, India

Me Aged 27 (Winter of January 2003) On Holiday in Nottingham, England, UK (During my University of Luton (UK) days)

Me Aged 27 (Winter of January 2003), On Holiday in Nottingham, England, UK (During my University of Luton (UK) days)

Spider-Man: Me Aged 27 (Spring break of April 2003), On Holiday in Copenhagen, Denmark (During my University of Luton days)

Spider-Man: Me Aged 27 (Spring break of April 2003), On Holiday in Copenhagen, Denmark (During my University of Luton (UK) days)

English Summer: Aged 27, just days before my 28th Birthday (June 2003), on the Salisbury Plains of England, UK (During University of Luton days)

English Summer: Aged 27, just days before my 28th Birthday (June 2003), on the Salisbury Plains of England, UK (During my University of Luton days)

Me aged 28 (Winter of January 2004), In front of (opposite) our house, in Oslo, Norway

Me aged 28 (Winter of January 2004), In front of (opposite) our house, in Oslo, Norway

Eurotrip (Spring of 2005) The Sound of Music Tour: Aged 29 (April 2005), In Salzburg, Austria  (Tulip Season)

Eurotrip (Spring of 2005) The Sound of Music Tour: Aged 29 (April 2005), In Salzburg, Austria
(Tulip Season)

Eurotrip (Spring of 2005) Going Dutch: Aged 29 (April 2005), In the surrounding areas of Den Haag (a.k.a. The Hague), The Netherlands (Tulip Season)

Eurotrip (Spring of 2005) Going Dutch: Me aged 29 (April 2005), In the surrounding areas of Den Haag (a.k.a. The Hague), The Netherlands (Tulip Season)

Aged 30 (August 2005), At Home, 56 Siripura (SL)

Aged 30 (August 2005), At Home, 56 Siripura (SL)

Me aged 30 (September 2005), At Home, 56 Siripura (SL)

Me aged 30 (September 2005), At Home, 56 Siripura (SL)

Aged 31 (Summer of December 2006), In Front of COFA (College of Fine Arts), UNSW (University of New South Wales), In Sydney, Australia (During my COFA (UNSW) days)

Aged 31 (Summer vacation of December 2006), In Front of COFA (College of Fine Arts), UNSW (University of New South Wales), In Sydney, Australia (During my COFA (UNSW) days)

Winter Down Under (But warmer in Northeastern Australia): Me aged 32 (May 2008), At the Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, Australia

Winter Down Under (But warmer in Northeastern Australia): Me aged 32 (May 2008), At the Great Barrier Reef, off the coast of Queensland, Australia

Me aged 33 (July 2008) Paris, France

Me aged 33 (Summer of July 2008), In Paris, France

Côte d'Azur (French Riviera): Me aged 34 (July 2009), In Monaco

Côte d’Azur (French Riviera): Me aged 34 (Summer of July 2009), In Monaco

Me aged 34 (September 2009), At the Champs-Élysées, Paris, France

Me aged 34 (Autumn of September 2009), At the Champs-Élysées, Paris, France

Me aged 36 (Late Summer of September 2011), In front of India Gate, New Delhi, India (On Holiday)

Me aged 36 (Late Summer of September 2011), In front of India Gate, New Delhi, India (On Holiday)

Me aged 39 (November 2014) In Hahndorf (Adelaide Hills region of South Australia), Australia (On Holiday)  This is my profile picture on my Facebook page! But, Of course I added the rainbow colours only a couple of days ago (In favour of The U.S. Supreme Court legalizing same-sex marriage nationwide) One Step for the United States, a Giant Leap for Mankind, Worldwide (with apologies to Neil Armstrong  ;) )

Me aged 39 (November 2014), In Hahndorf (Adelaide Hills region of South Australia), Australia (On Holiday)
This is my profile picture on my Facebook page! But, Of course I added the rainbow colours only a couple of days ago
(In favour of The U.S. Supreme Court legalizing same-sex marriage nationwide)
One Step for the United States, a Giant Leap for Mankind, Worldwide (with apologies to Neil Armstrong 😉 )

Today Morning: Me aged 40 (June 2015), At Home, 56, Siripura (SL)

Today Morning: Me aged 40 (June 2015), At Home, 56, Siripura (SL)

Tweets:
Posted about me, on my 40th Birthday

Some Others (Celebrities) who turned 40 this month, of June 2015!!!!!

Sexy Brit turns 40

Hot Woman turns 40

Nuwan Sen
Nuwan Sen n’ Style
Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense
Born in the Year: 1975!!!!!
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A Trio of Nominations
I’ve been nominated, by three different Bloggers, for a trio of Blog Awards.
Liebster award 2015Liebster Award by Vinnieh of Vinnieh on 20th May 2015
(A superb film blogger, and one of the earliest bloggers to locate my blog)
Most dragons loyalty awardDragon’s Loyalty Award by Reut Ziri of Sweet Archive on  29th May 2015
(A music and cinema blogger, whose blog I stumbled upon quite recently)
Beautiful Bloggers AwardBeautiful Blog Award by Jonathan & Aaron Ferrara of Husband & Husband on 4th June 2015
(A couple of published authors, who also happen to be a lovely young married couple as well)

So thank you Vinnieh, Reut, Jonathan & Aaron for considering me worthy of the recognition you’ve awarded me, or rather, and especially, my Blog. And am truly sorry for the delay.

This is my 2nd Liebster Award (different logo though) and Dragon Loyalty Award (see my previous s), and my very 1st Beautiful Blog Award.

So here’s the usual drill (as many of you, my fellow bloggers, would already know)

*Thank the people who nominated me, and add the pictures of the awards above. (DONE)

*Answer the eight questions prepared by Vinnieh, for me, for the Liebster Award

Vinnieh’s Q1. What made you decide to start writing a blog?
Nuwan Sen’s A1. I needed a platform, to place my film critiques, without anyone ruining my articles. So that I can publish them, in their original state, as written by me.

VQ2. A night out with friends or a movie night in?
NSA2. A night out with friends, watching a movie on the Big Screen; and then discussing and analysing it at length. But haven’t done that for ages.

VQ3. Buffy or Charmed?
NSA3. Neither

VQ4. What is favourite item of clothing?
NSA4. Straight/tight fit, Blue Jeans, that have never gone out of style since the 1800’s (for casual wear), with a loose simple T-shirt, or tucked in fitting shirt. Formal wear: I love the Indian Kurta, combined with the western formal trouser, with dress socks & sleek shoes.

VQ5. Who is your favourite actress if you had to choose just one?
NSA5. Audrey Hepburn, Of Course!!!!!

VQ6. How do you follow news around the world?
NSA6. On the net, television news, and foreign newspapers and magazines, when available.

VQ7. What is the most disturbing film you have ever seen?
NSA7. Rosemary’s Baby (1968) I think. It’s an excellent psychological horror movie, by veteran film director, Roman Polanski. I highly recommend it.

VQ8. Are you get up and go person or someone who needs to be motivated?
NSA8. Get up and go person (in the rest of the world) & someone who needs to be motivated (in lazy lethargic lanka).
(DONE)

*List 7 Random thing about myself for the Dragon Loyalty and Beautiful Blog, Awards

About Me
1. The best thing that happened to my life is  (a.k.a. Gingy). She’s my little pet (literally), a puppy I adopted on the 7th of December, 2014, exactly half a year ago, today (See & follow her Facebook Page, Gingerella Sen, if you are a dog/animal lover).

Last Night: Gingerella (a.k.a. Gingy) enjoying some of my Audrey Hepburn films, from my collection. In my Room - On my Bed

Last Night: Gingerella (a.k.a. Gingy) enjoying some of my Audrey Hepburn films, from my collection.
In my Room – On my Bed

2. I have never been on a date, till date. Been out with friends, both male and female, on a one on one basis (lunch/dinner/movie/other outings), but never on a date.

3. I believe in Equal Rights. Am a Gentleman to a Lady, and a bitch to bitch. Well actually I tend to have a lot of patience, but there is always a limit to everything and anything.

4. I practice my own version of the cliché, “Forgive & Forget ”. I prefer to forgive, and forget they ever existed.

5. I wish no one any harm. About people that make me unhappy, I wish them all the best, but hope that they just stay the fuck away from my life.

6. I love the city and country of my birth (New Delhi, India); but dislike the country of my unfortunate roots (Sri Lanka), that has given me nothing but misery (and where I happen to live now, unfortunately).

7. Ps is the most beautiful concrete jungle, I have ever lived in, till date.

8. I have lived in six countries, in three continents. I consider myself international, a citizen of the world, going beyond borders. I belong to any country, that accepts me as one of their own.
(DONE)

*Nominate 10 Bloggers for all three awards pictured above.

1. Ruth of Silver Screenings
2. Jim Turnbull of The Good, the Bad and the Average
3. Robert of Righteous Cinema
4. Kristina of Speakeasy
5. Paul S of Pfeiffer Pfilms and Meg Movies
6. Jackson of Movie Man Jackson
7. Akhiz of Akhiz Munawar
8. Roger of A Guy without Boxers
9. Coolsville of Coolsville
10. The Critic Man of Thy Criticman
(DONE)

*List 10 questions for my nominees

Nuwan Sen’s Q1. What’s your favourite novel?
NSQ2. What’s your favourite movie?
NSQ3. What’s your favourite movie, based on a novel, you have read?
NSQ4. What’s your favourite movie, based on a novel, you have not read?
NSQ5. British Hitchcock or Hollywood Hitchcock?
NSQ6. Non-American born Hollywood stars or American born Hollywood stars?
NSQ7. Which famous personality, did you idolise as a child, and whom do you idolise now, as an adult?
NSQ8. Which film starring Audrey Hepburn is your favourite? And which film role of hers, do you admire the most?
NSQ9. Who is your all time favourite film director?
NSQ10. What’s you favourite Oscar moment?
(DONE)

A Big Thank You, once again, for Vinnieh, Reut, Jonathan & Aaron, for honouring my Blog, No Nonsense with Nuwan Sen, with these award nominations.

Kind Regards
Nuwan Sen
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