Tag Archive: Non-Violence


In front of the Salt March Monument, in New Delhi, India (Sept 2011), whilst on holiday in India.

In front of the Salt March Monument, in New Delhi, India (Sept 2011), whilst on holiday in India.

On the 12th of March 1930, Mahatma Gandhi started the famous Salt March (a.k.a. Dandi March and/or Salt Satyagraha). A march which began in ‘Sabarmati Ashram’, in a suburb of Ahmadabad, in the state of Gujarat (located in Western India) and culminated in the coastal city of Dandi (in Gujarat itself), to make salt, to challenge the tax imposed on salt under the British Raj. As he continued on this 24-day, 240-mile (390 km) march, to produce salt without paying tax, thousands of Mahatma Gandhi’s followers joined in. Gandhi broke the salt laws at 6:30 am on the 6th of April, 1930, which ignited various acts of civil disobedience against the salt laws of the British Raj by millions of Indians. This was a significant event, in Gandhi’s non-violent struggle against British oppression, in colonial India.

Today marks the 85th Anniversary of the beginning of the famous Indian Salt March. One of the main events that finally led to the Independence of India, in 1947. This historic Salt March inspired various other marches around the globe. One of the most significant influences, of this brainchild, in the modern world, was that of the Selma to Montgomery march/es of 1965, 50 years ago, this month, in the United States of America. The Selma to Montgomery marches, were in protest, as part of the American Civil Rights movement, demanding that black American citizens, be given the right, to exercise their constitutional right to vote, in defiance of segregationist repression, that still existed in 60’s USA. Martin Luther King Jr., whose inspiration for his non-violent activism, was none other than Mahatma Gandhi, helped organize the Selma to Montgomery marches of 65’.

Nuwan Sen’s Historical Sense (नुवन सेन)

Also See:-

The day that paved the way for India’s Independence

Sixty Six years of Indian Independence

Republic Day of India & Australia Day

The Oscars Ceremony : Year 2015

On Sunday night (1st March 2015), watched the 1962 French New Wave flick Le Combat dans L’île. One of the best among, film française (French Films).

Jean-Louis Trintignant and Romy Schneider in a scene from Le Combat dans L'île (1962)

Jean-Louis Trintignant and Romy Schneider in a scene from Le Combat dans L’île (1962)

This masterpiece of the Nouvelle Vague (French New Wave), directed by Alain Cavalier, deals with a husband and a wife, a political assassination attempt, tested friendships and infidelity. It’s a brilliant movie starring Jean-Louis Trintignant and Romy Schneider, as husband and wife; and Henri Serre, as a close friend, kind confidant and ultimate lover.

Jean-Louis Trintignant, plays a foolish man, conned into a rebellious group, and, though not necessarily an abusive husband, definitely a bully of a husband, and a very possessive and untrusting husband, with a major inferiority complex. Yet he isn’t as sceptical, in fact happens to be pretty gullible, when it comes to outside negative influences, that doesn’t concern his marriage. He resides in Paris, France, with his beautiful wife.

One day Clément (Jean-Louis Trintignant), gets involved in a political assassination attempt, which happens to be the brainchild of Serge (Pierre Asso), his superior, among the underground rebels; unaware to Clément’s wife, Anna (Romy Schneider). It is Clément who pulls the trigger, under the guidance of Serge, during attempt to kill a famous French politician. Soon Clément is forced to abscond, along with Anna, to his childhood friend, Paul’s (Henri Serre) home, a safe haven, in the countryside. Here Clément learns, that it’s actually Serge who betrayed him. Thus he vows to take his revenge, for his own folly, in trusting Serge with his life. Paul, being a modern day democrat, and an advocate of non-violence, is horrified by Clément’s involvement in the failed assassination attempt, and throws him out of his house. Yet for Clément, with nothing but vengeance in his mind, takes no heed to Paul’s contempt towards him, and leaves for South America, in search of Serge, leaving Anna behind.

Anna is devastated, and falls into a grave depression, but Paul, along with the help of Cécile (Diana Lepvrier), Paul’s housemaid, pulls her out of it. Soon news of Clément being a wanted man, for the murder of Serge, reaches France. With no news from Clément, Paul and Anna fall into each others arms. But soon Clément returns, and now devoured by jealousy, after he learned of his wife’s infidelity, keeps challenging Paul to a dual. Sensible Paul keeps refusing. But the immature Clément wouldn’t let the couple, that is now expecting a child together, be, and wouldn’t stop harassing them until Paul agrees to a fair fight. It’s a matter of honour for, the archaic mentality of the male chauvinistic, Clément. While Paul and Anna, are more open minded, practical, and nice couple, who seem perfect for each other. But thanks to the brashness, of Clément, the story is headed for an, uncalled for, shootout, with tragic consequences.

BEHIND THE SCENES: The cast of Le Combat dans L'île, having fun on the sets.

BEHIND THE SCENES: The cast of Le Combat dans L’île, having fun on the sets.

Character Analysis  
Clément is a failure in life, which gives rise to his unkind ways, violent mentality, inferiority complex and insecurity. He is an extremist fool. He beats his wife, yet he truly loves her. Loves her to the brink of suffocation. His physical appearance adds to his characterization. He is a good looking bloke, yet not well rewarded in height, and not as handsome as his close friend Paul. It’s an interesting contrast between the two friends. Paul is tall, handsome, kind, sensible and practical. A perfect gentleman. While Clément is brash, unsympathetic, immature, moody, rough and unsophisticated in mannerism. Anna is a former actress, who’s left the stage, after getting married. She seems to have an existentialist personality. Clément is very possessive of her, he feels he own her. Anna rebels against his domineering behaviour, and is constantly horrified of his violent tendencies, yet she almost always ultimately gives in, letting him have his way. She revolts against his brutishness, but yet, at the same time, is submissive. She loves and fears him and seems tired of fighting, yet she doesn’t accept his negative attitude towards life. In fact, once she tells him, that he is ‘‘killing her’’. She means metaphorically, as well as his physical bullying towards her. The way he strangles her neck with lust, as he kisses her. He treats her as his property, property he loves to death. But what’s more ironic here is, as she tells him, he’s ‘‘killing her’’, metaphorically, he is actually ready to kill the traitor, Serge, the man who betrayed him. Three really intriguing character sketches here. Anna’s love for Clément, shows her love for a passionate romance, at the edge of being deadly. Yet, when she finally falls for Paul, it’s more of a settle-down kind of love affair. Relaxed, along with a kinder and gentler man, a complete contrast to her ruthless, obsessive, husband. With Paul she’s ready to start a family, and live happily. That is until, Clément comes back and gets ready to ruin her stress free life.

Symbolism of the Landscape: The Secluded Isle  
The countryside where Paul lives is beautiful. Especially Paul’s little Isle, with his Tudor style house atop; with the dark timber frameworks, and white plaster; along with a river flowing below. It’s picture perfect. A happy private and scenic retreat, away from habitation. Perfect for a couple in love, a relaxed lifestyle, and great for bringing up a family. It’s such a romantically  beautiful landscape. A place which landscape artists would love to paint, poets would love to write about, and writers would love to use to muse about their next venture. Yet, the place can also be symbolic, of isolation, loneliness and insecurity. Ultimately this beautiful location is where all the drama unfolds. The climax. The final combat in the isle, takes place, as the title suggests. This is where the fire and ice (as the English title of the movie, Fire and Ice, suggests) face each other. While the fire tries to melt the ice, the ice tries to extinguish the fire. One through foolish provocation, the other forced against his will.

A marvellous movie by Alain Cavalier, with a superb cast. Romy Schneider happens to be one of my favourite actresses, from European cinema. Schneider is of Austrian birth, but she’s acted in French, Italian, German and English language movies. Le Combat dans L’île happens to be her first venture into the Nouvelle Vague. French actor, Henri Serre, happens to be the star, of my all time favourite French flick, director François Truffaut’s New Wave classic, Jules et Jim (1962), which happens to be part my all time favourite, Top-10 Films (see my list of critiques titled Why I love …. from November/December 2012 on IMDB).

Le Combat dans L’île, is a blend of Art Cinema meets a thriller, combined with a love story, a tragedy, and more than a pinch of the element of noir. The film itself, like the character of Anna, embodies an existentialist undercurrent. A beautiful directorial debut feature by Alain Cavalier

Le Combat dans L’île (1962). Pure Excellence!!!!! 10/10!!!!

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense

I got to watch only two movies on the big screen, during my travels in Australia. Here are couple of my quick critiques.

Logan Lerman & Brad Pitt, in a scene from FURY (2014)

Logan Lerman & Brad Pitt, in a scene from FURY (2014)

Fury in Adelaide
On the 6th of November 2014, I got to watch Fury (2014) at the Palace Cinema in Adelaide, Australia (See my post Holidaying in South Australia).

A very unique fictional insight into the last year of the actual second World War. The audience gets to spend one long day with Brad Pitt, Logan Lerman, Shia LaBeouf and their crew, mostly confined into a war tank. The movie starts off by showing us the credits in an indirect, more naturalistic, manner, with the word ‘Fury’ painted on the shaft of the Tank.

Towards the final days of the war, in April 1945 (the war ended in September 1945), a new young recruit, Norman Ellison (Logan Lerman) joins the crew of the tank named ‘Fury’, commanded by Don Collier, a.k.a. ‘Wardaddy’ (Brad Pitt). In a blink of an eye, the inexperienced, young and innocent, Norman is thrown into the chaos of war.

The movie is very beautifully and realistically filmed, as if filmed in real-time, with a video camera planted inside a war tank. The ‘Tiger 131’ tank used in the film was a genuine ‘Tiger I’ tank, and that too the only operating one in the world. It was loaned by ‘The Bovington Tank Museum’, in the United Kingdom, for the film.

The characters may seem a bit clichéd, as we’ve seen a number of films based on WWII since the actual war itself. But this does go beyond to show various sadistic homicidal characters, who aren’t the enemy, but on the good side, the side that brought an end to the gruelling war. Americans. Even they are shown as being heartless and insensitive themselves. Contradicting to that we see a German soldier who actually saves the young American, Norman’s life, in the movie. After all they were human too and acting on orders. Without painting a Good or Bad picture directly in Black and White, we see an ambiguity of various shades of grey within the American characters, including Wardaddy. Contrasting to the almost inhumane crew, Norman’s naïvety is as fresh and clean as a bar of lime based soap for the filthy crew. The inexperienced Norman obviously doesn’t fit in.

The perfect movie sequence (as mentioned by another blogger, Righteous Cinema, with whom I agree with) is the nerve wrecking scene with the two innocent German women, and the nasty filthy crew members of ‘Fury’ harassing them. Of course, it’s implied, that one of the women gets screwed by young Norman (or rather is made love to), consensually from both parties. Most probably that idea was a necessity, more cinematically, to calm the audience in a tense movie, rather than for Norman to get laid. It’s after this implied sex, that the rest of the gang of ‘Fury’, except for Wardaddy, applaud Norman’s manhood, and degradingly treat the two women, objectifying them. A sequence where we, the audience, feels disgust towards the American soldiers, who’ve supposedly come to save the country from a brutal war, instead behaving like animals and treating innocent victims of war as their own rightful property to use and abuse as they feel like. It could also be a hint on current American soldiers based in Iraq, Afghanistan and Syria (though they aren’t engaged in battle anymore). Of course this doesn’t depict every single American soldier, current or back in the day. This is just a generalisation of what any human being of any country at war is capable of. As at the same time we see a kind hearted, humanitarian, personality, in young Norman. And a man principals who doesn’t condone their animalistic behaviour towards the women, through Wardaddy.

Norman’s kindness and purity, contrasting to the rest of crew, touches one’s heart. We feel really sorry for this out of place youngster. Yet we see him turn from an innocent, unwilling to commit murder, into braver soldier, who ends up crazily shooting at the enemy war tanks. Towards the end it does feel a tad silly, when the enemy comes marching in, and Wardaddy refuses to leave his, immobilised, old tank, and the little group tries to fight off hundreds and hundreds of men of opposition. Yet it’s so brilliantly filmed that it felt as if it were based on a true story about a young mans experiences on his first day at war.

It might not seem like a perfect film, but what film is that great to perfection without a single flaw. Thus my rating is still a 10/10 for Excellence in story telling. This was my first experience of Logan Lerman on the Big Screen. Have been a fan of his, since I watched Meet Bill (2007) almost six years ago, on DVD. And have watched so many films of his on DVD. Prior to Meet Bill, I had seen quite a few films of his as child star, but I didn’t know him back them, nor did I realise all those films had the same child artiste in them.

Fury, amongst the best of 2014. Excellent !!!!! 10/10!!!!!    

Matthew McConaughey explores the icy deserted lanscape, in the poster of INTERSTELLAR (2014)

Matthew McConaughey explores the icy deserted lanscape, in a frozen alien planet, in the poster of INTERSTELLAR (2014)

Interstellar @ Chatswood
I watched Interstellar (2014) at the Hoyts,  in Chatswood’s Westfield (Chatswood is a suburb in Sydney’s Northshore), Australia, on the 10th of November, 2014 (See my post Holidaying in Australia (NSW)).

Interstellar (2014) is as visually a spectacular viewing, as it is thoughtful and intellectually stimulating. One of the best fictitious Science-fiction films set in Space since Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968). Christopher Nolan, a genius in filmmaking, has brought out something exceptional out here. Like it’s Kubrick predecessor, Nolan has brought out a fictional story set in space, that explores far beyond the reaches of time and space, than man could ever imagine possible. Beyond the universe of black holes, and through the wormholes, combining together special effects artistry with intellect, as previously only Kubrick had brought about. Why do I specifically keep calling it a fictitious flick set in space, ‘cause it’s not a necessity that a movie on Space exploration be just a fabrication of a directors imagination. Apollo 13 (1995) was a near excellent movie experience, set in space, and based on a true incident.

2001: A Space Odyssey was a surreal masterpiece of the science fiction genre, set in space. I specifically state ‘set in space’, for there are rare great science-fiction and surreal films like, Metropolis (1927), A Clockwork Orange (1971) and Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004), to name a few, that are not set in space. Post 2001: A Space Odyssey, only the animated Wall-E (2008) and Gravity (2013) came up to it’s standard of being an exceptional fictitious film, set in space.

Christopher Nolan has brought out some excellently intellectual cinematic experiences, when he started out, with films like Following (1998) and Memento (2000). And the near excellent, The Prestige (2006). But when the CGI bug hit him, he seems to be serving up the masses, rather than the cerebral usage classes. I wasn’t a fan of his ‘Batman’ films, except for his second instalment, The Dark Knight (2008), which was pretty good, especially thanks to Heath Ledger’s (posthumously) Oscar winning performance as the ‘Joker’. The only other recent movie of Nolan’s, that I want to watch, and am still waiting to do so, is the psychologically driven, Inception (2010).

I don’t want to really mention the story of Interstellar here, ‘cause it’s better to just go in and experience and try to understand the film. It has some really interesting characters played by Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway, Michael Caine, David Gyasi, Jessica Chastain, Matt Damon, Casey Affleck, Wes Bentley and Topher Grace. It’s a pity Chastain’s character hardly has much time to develop as Murph, especially since her character development transpires more as the younger Murph, played by little Mackenzie Foy. Same with her brother Tom, played by Timothée Chalamet (as the teenage version), and later by Casey Affleck. But Tom’s development isn’t as much of a necessity as is Murph’s. Nor is there much of relevance when it comes to characters played by Wes Bentley and Topher Grace. But the person’s whose talent seems most wasted in the film, is the negative shaded character played by Matt Damon. Nolan could have directed a lesser known personality, who can still act well of course, than waste somebody who’s capable of delivering so much more to a project.

None the less the film is an exceptional experience both visually and psychologically. British theoretical physicist and cosmologist, Stephen Hawking, would be proud. I really wonder what Stephen Hawking’s would have to say about this flick.

Definitely the best space age and futuristic film to come out in recent years. And no doubt a director’s movie. I predict an Oscar nomination coming Nolan’s way. Christopher Nolan should at least get an Oscar nomination, if not necessarily a win, for this movie.

Interstellar, the best science fiction film of 2014. Excellent !!!!! 10/10!!!!!  

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense
Nuwan Sen’s War Film Sense
Nuwan Sen and Science Fiction  

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Indira Gandhi30 years ago today, on 31st October 1984, Prime Minister Indira Gandhi was gunned down by two Sikh bodyguards of hers. This is a small tribute to one of the most influential personalities to have ever existed in Indian politics. The one and only female Prime Minister the Indian Government has seen till date. India’s own Iron Lady, Shreemati (Mrs.) Indira Gandhi. Indira Gandhi in ColourIndira Nehru graced the covers of Indian politics from a very young age. Being born to Independent India’s first Prime Minister, Jawaharlal Nehru (long before he became Prime Minister), whilst India was still under the British Raj, on 19th November, 1917; she was brought up by her, on and off imprisoned, father through letters, educating her on the ways of the world, India’s struggle for independence and modern politics. One of my favourite non fiction books happens to be Freedom’s Daughter: Letters Between Indira Gandhi and Jawaharlal Nehru (1922-39); Edited by Indira’s daughter-in-law, current president of the ‘Indian National Congress’ party, Sonia Gandhi. Of course I read this book about 13 or14 years ago, and really enjoyed the literary transactions between the father and the daughter. For my Bachelors degree, I also studied Nehru’s independence speech from 1947. Another inspirational piece of English Literature I enjoyed back in the latter part of the 90’s decade. Nehru’s prose is spot on and I highly recommend both the book and the speech to any lover of Literature, as well as any History buff.

Little Indira supported her father, along with his mentor, Mahatma Gandhi, through their struggle for India’s independence, in her own way. One incident was during the Swadeshi Movement, of the 1920’s, when Indira was still a child, where people were advised to burn away all western items of clothing and accessories as a rebellion against western suppression of the third world. Little Indira, did her part, by throwing away her favourite, prettily dressed, blue eyed, blonde haired, doll. Post independence, she helped her father through his political career, serving as his unofficial ‘Chief of Staff’, and after his death, she took over the reins.
Indira Gandhi - Like Father Like DaughterWith socialist ideologies, Indira Gandhi became the 3rd Prime Minister of India, on 24th of January, 1966. She served three terms as the Indian Prime Minister, two terms from 1966 to 1977, and a third from 1980 to 1984, making her the second longest Premier of the Indian Government (the longest being her father). Politically she was both loved and despised for her various political decisions, regarding her Motherland and the bordering countries. Thus she sparked a disposition of both, being great and terrible, of fame and notoriety, all at the same time. None the less, one can’t deny she was one of greatest and most influential assets in the development of the Indian continent. Modern India wouldn’t be India, without Indira Gandhi’s non-violent, people friendly, socialist policy. Despite all of India’s faults, the country has always moved forward, and that’s mainly thanks to the Nehru-Gandhi family. After the death of Indira Gandhi, her son, Rajiv Gandhi, became Prime Minister, until he too was assassinated, in 1991.

Adored or loathed, respected or not, Indira Gandhi will live on in the hearts of all Indians, and others with an attachment with India and a soft corner for the Nehru-Gandhi family. The Nehru-Gandhi family to India, is what the Kennedy’s were to America, what the Bhutto’s were to Pakistan, and what Modern Royalty means to Britain and Monaco.

Indira was not just a political icon, but a sophisticated personality with a great sense of style. When Indira, an Oxford graduate, got married to Feroze Gandhi, she made both a political and fashion statement when she wore the pink Khadhi sari woven by her father in prison. And who could forget her trademark salt n’ pepper hairdo, with jet black hair and a bold fiery white streak parting on one side.
Have a look below at the life of Indira Gandhi through pictures:-

Indira with her father's mentor Mahatma Gandhi during his fast in 1924

Little Indira with her father’s mentor Mahatma Gandhi during his fast in 1924

Indira Priyadarshini Nehru

Indira Priyadarshini Nehru

Indira Nehru with her father Jawaharlal Nehru in Gurez, in Kashmir, India, in the 1940's

Indira Nehru with her father Jawaharlal Nehru in Gurez, in Kashmir, India, in the 1940’s

The marriage ceremony of Feroze Gandhi to Indira Nehru, 26th March, 1942

The marriage ceremony of Feroze Gandhi to Indira Nehru, 26th March, 1942

Indira with father Jawaharlal Nehru and actor Charles Chaplin in Bürgenstock, Switzerland, in 1953

Indira with father Jawaharlal Nehru and actor Charles Chaplin in Bürgenstock, Switzerland, in 1953

Indira with the Dalai Lama

Indira with the Dalai Lama

Indira with Jacqueline Kennedy in 1962

Indira with Jacqueline Kennedy in 1962

Indira with her father & the Kennedy's in India, 1962

Indira with her father & the Kennedy’s in India, 1962

Indira Gandhi at Nixon's Dinner

Indira Gandhi at Nixon’s Dinner

Indira Gandhi with actress Gina Lollobrigida on the Left & son and daughter-in-law, Rajiv & Sonia Gandhi on the Right, in the mid 70's

Indira with Vyjayanthimala & Nargis Dutt

Indira with Vyjayanthimala & Nargis Dutt

Indira Gandhi with her two sons, two daughter-in-law's and two grandchildren

Indira Gandhi with her two sons, two daughter-in-law’s and two grandchildren

Indira Gandhi with the Queen of England

Indira Gandhi with the Queen of England

Indira Gandhi with Margaret Thatcher

Indira Gandhi with Margaret Thatcher

Indira Gandhi with Ronald & Nancy Reagan

Indira Gandhi with Ronald & Nancy Reagan

Nuwan Sen’s Historical Sense
Nuwan Sen and a Sense of Modern Indian History
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For my own Blogathon, I decided to work on the famous/infamous 60’s piece of satire by Stanley Kubrick, Dr Strangelove: or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964), made at the height of the cold war, about an accidental American nuclear mission to blow up the then communist Soviet Union (USSR).
Dr. Strangelove pix 3The plot
Dr Strangelove: or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb was made and set at the height of the cold war, a time when there was no actual physical warfare, but political and military tensions arose between the communist countries of the Eastern bloc and the Western powers (NATO headed by the United States); hence known as the Cold War. A crazed general, Jack D. Ripper (Sterling Hayden) secretly orders a surprise nuclear attack on Russia (USSR). Everyone, from the President of the United States, President Merkin Muffley (Peter Sellers) to General Ripper’s aid, RAF exchange officer, Group Captain Mandrake (Peter Sellers again), fruitlessly try to stop the bombing. A bombing which may cause a Doomsday scenario, ridding the entire planet Earth of it’s inhabitants. Which is a fact confirmed by, the very sinister looking, Dr. Strangelove (Peter Sellers yet again), the President’s advisor. Thus ensues a hilarious battle of the wits.

'The War Room'

‘The War Room’

The Art Décor
The set designs are beyond impressive. Especially the ‘War Room’ at The Pentagon in Washington D.C. (Arlington County, Virginia), USA, where the President and his men discuss how to avert the impending crisis. The room is so well designed, futuristic in style (also remember the movie was made at the height of the Space Age, which brought about an important facet towards the Cold War), it feels like a space station. And supposedly when actor Ronald Regan became the President of the United States in 1981, he had wanted to see the ‘War Room’, which existed in the movie, Dr. Strangelove. Alas!!! was he disappointed to find out that such a thing didn’t exist.
Added to that, the interiors of the flight is very impressive, as is the mirrored bedroom of Miss Scott (Tracy Reed) and the offices at the Air Force Base. Though set in the States, this British-American film was entirely made in England, United Kingdom.
Besides the art décor, the cinematography is an added bonus with beautiful aerial shots of snow capped mountains to the ice bergs on the ocean floor.

PETER SELLERS TRIPLE ROLE Top Left: as President Merkin Muffley Bottom Left: as Dr. Strangelove Right (Top & Bottom): as Captain Lionel Mandrake

PETER SELLERS TRIPLE ROLE
Top Left: as President Merkin Muffley
Bottom Left: as Dr. Strangelove
Right (Top & Bottom): as Captain Lionel Mandrake

Trio of Sellers
Peter Sellers does a triple role of three very varied characters in Dr Strangelove.

(i) Sellers plays President Merkin Muffley, the President of the United States, the only serious character is this dark comedy. Ironic, considering the fact that Sellers is known more as a comedian than a serious actor. Though President Merkin Muffley is a very serious character, with a slight (non-comical) cold, his tongue in cheek name suggests otherwise. The bald president is named  Merkin, and a merkin is actually a pubic wig. Added to that he does have some interesting dialogues, like “Gentleman, you can’t fight in here. This is the War Room”. Peter Sellers improvises a lot of his dialogues with the three characters he plays.

(ii) Sellers plays Captain Lionel Mandrake. This the most recognisable Sellers character, as a Brit, serving the British crown and country. Added to that his appearance, with his famous moustache intact, he feels more Peter Sellers than any of the other characters he plays.

(iii) Last but not the least, Sellers plays Dr. Strangelove, the presidents scientific advisor, an ex-Nazi scientist. Most probably recruited through ‘Operation Paperclip’, through which many a German scientists, technicians et al, from Nazi Germany and other countries, were brought into the United States, post World War – II, for employment beneficial to the United States. Dr. Strangelove is the most intriguing character, as the name suggests. His actual German name happens to be Dr. Merkwürdigliebe, which he apparently changed to it’s literal English meaning, i.e. Strangelove, when he became an American citizen. He is a proper avant-garde sinister character with a disability. We see the menacing Dr. Strangelove to be wheelchair bound, which adds to his sinister character. Sellers modelled this character after the character of ‘Rotwang’ from Fritz Lang’s Metropolis (1927), my favourite silent film without sound, and my favourite film from the Roaring 20’s. Adding to the appearance of this disturbing character, Sellers is seen wearing one glove, a black glove that belonged to director Stanley Kubrick. Recognising the connection to Lang’s work, Sellers borrowed one of Kubrick’s black gloves, which he felt naturally menacing. Dr. Strangelove is by far the best interpretation of a evil comical genius by Sellers in the movie. The character has a unique German accent that adds to his threatening appearance. And the character slowly losing the control of his gloved hand, due to ‘diagnostic apraxia’ or ‘alien hand syndrome’, a rare neurological disorder that causes hand movements without a person having control over it’s actions, adds to the hilarity of the situation at hand (Pun intended).

'Dr. Strangelove'

‘Dr. Strangelove’

The rest of the lead Cast & the characters they play
Besides Sellers, George C. Scott is hilarious as the very childish, immature and the heavily bellied, General Buck Turgidson. His surname itself suggests his pompous and pretentious personality. He also has false pride and a fake sense of patriotism, which finds him jubilant at the prospects of bombing down the communist nation.

Sterling Hayden is superb as the eccentric, paranoid, extremist, ultra-nationalist. His charcter genuinely believes in a conspiracy theory by the communists to impurify the “precious bodily fluids” of Americans, through Water fluoridation. Apparently it’s a Russian conspiracy to pacify people so that they would easily trust authority. The name Jack D. Ripper is an obvious synonym to the notorious Jack the Ripper of 19th Century England (London).

Major T. J. “King” Kong, Piloting the Air Force flight, was initially to be played by Peter Sellers himself, but was replaced by Slim Pickens, once Sellers, who had been reluctant at first at the work load anyway, sprained his ankle and could not work in the cramped cockpit set.

Keenan Wynn as a clueless Colonel Bat Guano, with a permanent horrified look on his face, is funny character himself. One interesting scene is, when he has to shoot off a coca cola machine in the bullet riddled Air Force building, he initially refuses stating it’s “private property”.

Also check out a young James Earl Jones in his debut performance as a Lieutenant Lothar Zogg, the B-52 bombardier.

'Miss Scott'

‘Miss Scott’

Sexual Connotations
The movie is filled with some really interesting sexual innuendoes via man made devices portrayed in very suggestive modes. One of the best sexual imagery is right at the beginning, as the credits role in. One plane is shown fuelling another, with very romantic music going on in the background. It literally looks like two flying insects mating up in the air. Could be a metaphor on the two heads of states trying to get on well together, a bit too intimately, during a crisis. Then there is a bomb falling towards it’s orgasmic end, with a man riding on it, waving his cowboy hat. Pretty homoerotic, to see a man riding a phallic shaped object hurling downwards. It’s hilariously intended to look overtly sexual, and apparently Stanley Kubrick confirmed it.
Ironically the bikini clad Tracy Reed (in her introductory role), as General Turgidson’s secretary and mistress, the only female character in the entire male oriented movie, is the least sexual impression in Dr Strangelove, besides her semi-nude centrefold, aptly nicknamed ‘Miss Foreign Affairs’, shown through a Playboy magazine.

Screening Delay
A private screening of the film was scheduled for the 22nd of November, 1963, the same day President John F. Kennedy was assassinated. The film was just weeks from its scheduled premiere. But due to the assassination the release was ultimately delayed until January 1964.

Award Nominations
The film was nominated for four Oscars. For ‘Best Picture’, ‘Best Director’ to Stanley Kubrick, for Peter Sellers a ‘Best Actor’ nomination, and ‘Best Adapted Screenplay’ for Stanley Kubrick, Peter George and Terry Southern. The movie won none. After all My Fair Lady (1964), well deservedly garnered the top three awards; for ‘Best Picture’, ‘Best Director’ for George Cukor, and a ‘Best Actor’ win for Rex Harrison; that year. And the historical epic Becket (1964), definitely deserved the award for ‘Best Adapted Screenplay’.

None the less, Stanley Kubrick’s Dr Strangelove: or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) is among the greatest movies ever made. And it’s definitely worth checking out.

My Rating
Excellent !!!!! 10/10.

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense
60's c

60's dTo my fellow Bloggers,
Do check out my previous post The Essential 60’s Blogathon. There is still time to take part in this blogathon, if you are interested.
Thanking you
Yours sincerely
Nuwan Sen

68 years ago today, on the 2nd of September, 1946, the Interim Government of India was formed. This was to assist the transition of India (and Pakistan) from British rule to independence. It remained in place, until the 15th of August, 1947, the date of the independence of the two new countries of India and Pakistan.

After World War – II, the British Raj, released all political prisoners of the ‘Quit India movement’, which was a civil disobedience movement, in response to Mahatma Gandhi’s call for Satyagraha, a non-violent resistance movement. Thus preparation began to hand over the country of India to Indians. The Interim Government of India, was headed by Jawaharlal Nehru, the first Prime Minister of India.

Also see my post ‘Sixty Six years of Indian Independence’, from the 15th of August, last year.

Nuwan Sen’s Historical Sense
नुवन सेन

भारत भारत भारत भारत भारत भारत भारत भारत भारत भारत भारत भारत भारत भारत भारत भारत भारत भारत भारत भारत

One of my favourite film directors, Richard Samuel Attenborough, died on Sunday 24th of August, 2014, less than a week away from his 91st Birthday. He was the older brother of Sir David Attenborough, a naturalist and broadcaster, and John Attenborough. John Attenborough died in November 2012.
Richard AttenboroughBaron Attenborough was born in the beautiful city of Cambridge, in the county town of Cambridgeshire, England, United Kingdom; on the 29th of August, 1923. Born into an intellectual and heroic family; his mother was a founding member of the Marriage Guidance Council, and his father a scholar and academic administrator who was a fellow at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and wrote a standard text on Anglo-Saxon law; Richard Attenborough’s parents saved two Jewish girls during the Second World War and later adopted them once they discovered the girls’ parent’s were killed off. Richard Attenborough served in the Royal Air Force (RAF), during the Second World War. Soon he joined the RAF Film Unit at Pinewood Studios, where in 1943, he worked with Edward G. Robinson in the propaganda film, Journey Together (1945). The Acting bug hit him, whilst still serving in the Air Force (where he sustained permanent ear damage), and the rest is history.

I fell in love with the biographical epic tear-jerker Gandhi (1982), when I watched it as a child in the early-mid 1980’s. And as we had the video tape of Gandhi, at home, I have watched it a zillion times since then. Plus, when I was studying for my M.A. in International Cinema (2002-2003); at the University of Luton, Luton, UK; I got a chance to study this, three hour long, great epic, scene by scene. It was for my mini-dissertation, titled Historical, Heritage and Hackneyed Cinema: British and Hollywood Cinema set in early twentieth Century India, of 10,330 words, in my second semester. Gandhi was a movie that fell under ‘Historical Cinema’, where I did an analysis of racial tension (under the chapter White Bred over Brown Bred: Colonial Relations), the significance of land, specifically the ‘Train’ in Gandhi (under the chapter Landscape and it’s significance), and a character psychoanalysis (under the chapter Gender & Sexuality). Gender & Sexuality was the most crucial chapter in my mini-dissertation, which paved the way, to do a complete psychoanalysis on gender, for my final dissertation (on Hitchcockian Cinema) of 25,000 to 30,000 words, in my final semester.

Richard Attenborough and actor Ben Kingsley at the Oscars, in 1983. With their wins for Best Picture, Best Director & Best Actor, for GANDHI (1982).

Richard Attenborough and actor Ben Kingsley at the Oscars, in 1983.
With their wins for Best Picture, Best Director & Best Actor, for GANDHI (1982).

Attenborough’s directorial epic, Gandhi, is no doubt the best film to come out of the 1980’s (see my post My Favourite movie by decade, My Favourite Oscar Winner per decade from March 2014). The movie was based on the non-violent struggle of Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, India’s peace activist and modern day saint, who, during the British Raj, drove away the British colonist, by hurting their conscience, instead of acting against them through violence. Of course the movie depicts him as a perfectionist, but he was a human being, and no human being is perfect. He had his little flaws, yet he was a truly great human being. Gandhi deservedly won eight Oscars (out the eleven nominated for) in 1983, including for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Original Screenplay and Best Cinematography, among others. Gandhi won over 40 other awards in various other award functions (in various categories), including at the BAFTA’s and the Golden Globes.

Richard Attenborough’s acting career began on stage, where he met his future wife, stage actress Sheila Sim, with whom he appeared on the West End production of Agatha Christie’s The Mousetrap. This production led to the two falling in love and they were married in 1945. And they were happily married until Attenborough’s death on Sunday. Sheila Sim is currently suffering from senile dementia, which she was diagnosed with back in June 2012, just after her 90th Birthday. Richard Attenborough, who also attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, remained a Patron until his death.

Richard Attenborough with Laura Dern and Sam Neill in a scene from JURASSIC PARK (1993)

Richard Attenborough with Laura Dern and Sam Neill in a scene from JURASSIC PARK (1993)

As a teenager, in New Delhi, in 1994, I watched Steven Spielberg’s Jurassic Park (1993), on video tape, and later on the Big Screen, within that year. I thought it was a really good Sci-fi, B-movie. And I loved the way Attenborough’s character, Prof. John Hammond, explains the process of extracting blood (Dinosaur DNA) from a mosquito that had been preserved in amber fossil. At that age, DNA extraction and cloning really impressed me, something I learned as a kid in school in the late 80’s. The rest of the film was a visually spectacular drama, loved the CGI of the time, especially the creations of pre-historic animals, but what I found the most amazing was Prof. Hammond’s detailed explanation. I wasn’t so crazy about the sequels, The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997) and Jurassic Park III (2001), though. Yet I wouldn’t mind checking out the latest instalment, Jurassic World, which is yet to be released.
Richard Attenborough z Brighton Rock  (1947)Richard Attenborough starred in a lot of great movies throughout the 40’s, 50’s and 60’s, including In Which we Serve (1942), Brighton Rock (1947), The Man Within (1947), The Guinea Pig (1948), Boys in Brown (1949), Eight O’Clock Walk (1954), SOS Pacific (1959), The Angry Silence (1960), The Dock Brief (1962), The Great Escape (1963), The Flight of the Phoenix (1965), Doctor Dolittle (1967) and The Magic Christian (1969) with Ringo Starr of ‘The Beatles’, to name a few out of zillion he’s starred in. Brighton Rock, The Great Escape, The Flight of the Phoenix, Doctor Dolittle, 10 Rillington Place (1971), Jurassic Park and Miracle on 34th Street (1994), are amongst his most popular films as an actor. I have a vague memory of watching The Great Escape as a little kid, but am unsure. Anyway, I re-watched it more recently and loved it too. This excellent flick, based on a true story, is about several escape attempts by allied prisoners of war from a German POW camp, during World War – II.

In the late 60’s, Richard Attenborough, made his directorial debut, with the musical, Oh! What a Lovely War (1969). His next directorial venture was Young Winston (1972).
Richard Attenborough Young WinstonIn England, in 2002-2003, I watched Attenborough’s previous biographical epic, Young Winston (1972), at the University Library. This movie deals with former British Prime Minister, Winston Churchill’s, younger days, stationed in India and Sudan, as a cavalry officer. I really enjoyed it. Though no where near as great as Attenborough’s magnum opus, that was Gandhi, Young Winston was still a pretty good movie.

Besides Young Winston and Gandhi, as a director, Richard Attenborough, brought out some amazing biographical epics, like A Bridge Too Far (1977); about an unsuccessful Allied military operation, fought in the Netherlands and Germany during World War – II; Cry Freedom (1987); based on the life and death of prominent anti-apartheid activist Steve Biko; Chaplin (1992); on film genius, Sir Charles Chaplin, a.k.a. Charlie Chaplin; Shadowlands (1993); on the heart-rending love story between Oxford academic C. S. Lewis and American poet Joy Davidman, and her tragic death from cancer; In Love and War (1996) on Ernest Hemingway’s experiences during the First World War; and Grey Owl (1999), another bio-pic, this time about Archibald Belaney, a.k.a. Grey Owl, who was a British schoolboy who turned into an Indian trapper, and called himself ‘Grey Owl’.

Richard Attenborough didn’t just make bio-pics, he made a few out and out fictional movies as well, and his last film was Closing the Ring (2007).

Richard Attenborough zfilms Down Under, in Sydney, in 2008, I watched Closing the Ring (2007), on the Big Screen, Attenborough’s last venture. Pretty Good but far from great. Starring Shirley MacLaine, Christopher Plummer, Mischa Barton, Stephen Amell, Neve Campbell, Pete Postlethwaite and Brenda Fricker. The biggest mistake Attenborough did, was to take in the muscular pretty boy, Stephen Amell, who can’t act for peanuts. He just voiced the dialogues expressionlessly, like a pretty mannequin, a Barbie doll. The story was interesting enough though, set during the Second World War (in flashbacks) and the 1990’s; set in Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK and Michigan, USA. Towards the end, it becomes a bit cheesy and overtly melodramatic. But still an enjoyable enough watch, thanks to the veteran actors in it.

A sad loss, with the death of a British gem, Richard Attenborough. Day after tomorrow, 29th August, 2014, would be his 91st Birth anniversary. He’ll be remembered forever through his great works. May he rest in peace.

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense

Yesterday I watched Labor Day (2013), an excellent DVD I got brought down from the United States, thanks to my sister’s husband, along with a few other films.

Labour Day Poster

Let me start off with, Loved it!!!! Even though, not a critically acclaimed movie, I really enjoyed it to the extent of calling it an excellent venture. I’d agree, it’s not the best among Jason Reitman’s works. I have loved all of Reitman’s directorial ventures I have watched so far, i.e. Thank you for Smoking (2005), Juno (2007) and Up in the Air (2009). All superb pieces of satire. Thus Labor Day, is a very different genre from the director of sophisticated comedies.

A very dull paced piece of melodrama, most probably the core reason for the lack of it’s box office success, the movie deals with a depressed mother and son, leading a lonely life, until one day a convict forces his way to their home and ironically brings hope and contentment into their lives.

The best thing about the movie, besides the great director trying out his hand on something out of his comfort zone, is the superb acting talent he’s managed to rope in. The name Kate Winslet itself, on the credits, says it all. The movie should obviously be worth checking out, for her sake at least, if not for anything else. But the rest of the cast is just as excellent as well. Josh Brolin as the convict,  Gattlin Griffith as Winslet’s son, and other supporting cast in minor roles, including Clark Gregg, Alexie Gilmore, Tom Lipinski, Lucas Hedges, Brooke Smith, Micah Fowler, Brighid Fleming, Maika Monroe, James Van Der Beek and Tobey Maguire (who narrates the story and plays the adult version of Winslet’s son, in a minuscule appearance).

Kate Winslet  and Gattlin Griffith in a scene from the movie.

Kate Winslet and Gattlin Griffith in a scene from the movie.

Kate Winslet plays Adele, a woman who after giving birth to Henry (Gattlin Griffith), goes through many a miscarriages and ultimately when she does manage to give birth again, it’s to a stillborn baby girl. Soon her husband, Gerald (Clark Gregg) leaves her for another woman, which she doesn’t blame him for. Yet she falls into a deep depression, and is taken care of by her kind son, Henry. At the same time Adele tries her best to take care of her son too, while fighting depression and her physical decline along with it. Josh Brolin plays the convict, Frank, who finds a place in their home and heart, and falls in love with Adele. We see his past in flashbacks, where we learn, that he killed his immoral wife, and drowned his innocent baby, by accident. What’s really interesting in the movie, is to see the close knit relationships between the mother and son, and between Frank and Adele. Henry is Adele’s reason to be alive, while Frank gives her a reason to live. Being alive, and actually living, are two very different things.

Labor Day is a beautiful love story, which starts off as an intense thriller and then falls into a deeply melodramatic romance between two lonely adult souls, with a coming of age sub plot on young Henry.

Gattlin Griffith, Josh Brolin and Kate Winslet making 'Peach Pie' in LABOR DAY

Gattlin Griffith, Josh Brolin and Kate Winslet making ‘Peach Pie’ in LABOR DAY

A movie really worth checking out.

My verdict 10/10, might be the least best, but among the best none the less.

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense

I watched five films within the last five days, on TV5 MONDE. All French; Three feature length, two short films; One Canadian-French, four French-French Films. Here are five fast film reviews.

Nicola-Frank Vachon in and as 'Ésimésac (2012)'

Nicola-Frank Vachon in and as ‘Ésimésac (2012)’

Monday: 31/O3/2014: A Man without a Shadow, An Angel Feathering and A Smokers Detoxification.

Ésimésac (2012)
Ésimésac is a magical realism, Canadian-French, Feature Film. The story revolves around a fully grown two year old man, Ésimésac (Nicola-Frank Vachon) who resides in Saint-Élie-de-Caxton. A kind gentle man, with strength enough to pull a massive rock on his own. A man who was born without a shadow, the only reason for him to have an inferiority complex.
In this hunger stricken village, Ésimésac suggests that all get together and build a communal garden. Soon rumours are spread of a new railway stop in their village. Seeing the chance to make themselves rich, lead by the innocent Ésimésac, the village people abandon the garden and set to making cheap railway tracks instead. Only person who isn’t happy with this decision is Ésimésac’s sister. Meanwhile Ésimésac, unhappy at being shadowless, gets the village witch to help him get a shadow of an acorn. Soon that shadow starts to branch out, but at the cost of his sister turning ill and starting to feather, into an angel.
A beautiful piece of magical realism, by director Luc Picard, who also acts in the movie. 7/10

Detox (2012)
Detox is a nine minute short French-French movie, which I watched on Monday night itself, soon after Ésimésac finished. It’s about a man, an ex-smoker (played by Benoit Thiébault), going through a detoxification. While a mechanic (Fabrice Colson), smoking a cigarette, fixes the ex-smoker’s vehicle, the ex-smoker is outside, seated in a bench, under the scorching sun. He is waiting, with his brain boiling, anxious, nervous, tense, as everyone around him in the street smoke away. Will he give in, or won’t he???
Excellent and funny short flick, directed by Julien Bittner. 10/10

Detox and The Supper

Tuesday: 01/O4/2014: A Dialogue between Two Famous Individuals

Le Souper (1992), a.k.a. The Supper
Le Souper, set in France in 1815, just three weeks after Napoleon’s defeat at Waterloo. While Napoleon is in exile, on July 6, Charles-Maurice de Talleyrand (Claude Rich), a shrewd politician, invites the chief of police, a revolutionary, Joseph Fouché (Claude Brasseur) for a meal. The two sit down for a private late night dinner, as a revolt is brewing just outside their window. Their conversation ends up being a verbal duel, where they ferociously insult one another, while the political future of France is at stake.
A very enjoyable dialogue between two greatly notorious, power hungry, figures in France. At times boring, at times suspensefully intriguing. Directed by Édouard Molinaro. Based on a play by Jean-Claude Brisville. 8/10

Arthur Dupont as Manu  in 'Bus Palladium' (2010)

Arthur Dupont as Manu in ‘Bus Palladium’ (2010)

Thursday 03/O4/2014: An Eighties Rock-Group, A Blind Artist and A Naked Model

Bus Palladium (2010)
Bus Palladium (2010), is about an eighties rock group, that ends up being destroyed, when two men fall for the same woman. Arthur Dupont is excellent as Manu Pedraza, the lead singer of the group, LUST. The music is mind-blowing. I was just a kid growing up in the 80’s, and the music had a very nostalgic feel. Added to their own music, there were a few famed English background songs from the 70’s as well.
Enjoyable movie, with not necessarily a great story. It wouldn’t have been so good if not for the music. Directed by British born Christopher Thompson. 8/10

Argile (2012), a.k.a. Clay
Argile is the second short film I watched this week. It was shown soon after Bus Palladium, yesterday evening itself. An eighteen minute short film. We see an old woman (Edith Scob) sculpting a figure out of clay. A young male nude model, Alex (Laurent Delbecque) poses. The old woman is blind, thus she has to feel his body with her wrinkled soft hands. Soon it’s not her art that satisfies her hunger.
A aesthetically nice little erotic film, minus any actual nudity or sex. It’s only his shoulders and chest she touches with her clay stained hands, the rest is left to the imagination. A beautifully done, excellent, short film. 10/10

Laurent Delbecque as Alex in 'Argile' (2012), a.k.a. 'Clay'

Laurent Delbecque as Alex in ‘Argile’ (2012), a.k.a. ‘Clay’

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense

Untitled

Six Degrees of Separation: from Whoopi Goldberg to

Whoopi Goldberg 6°

… John Buchan
Goldberg played an unloved, lonely, young girl; leading a life under constant abusive circumstances, first by her father and then by her husband, in the early 20th century; in The Color Purple (1985), which was directed by Steven Spielberg (1), who also directed War Horse (2011), starring Jeremy Irvine (2), who acted in the most recent adaptation of Great Expectations (2012), an acclaimed novel by Charles Dickens (3), whose novel Oliver Twist has been the basis for many a movies, and one of the most famous adaptations happens to be the 1948 release, directed by David Lean (4), who also directed A Passage to India (1984), which starred Peggy Ashcroft (5), who appeared in The 39 Steps (1935), which was based on a novel by John Buchan (6).

… Gary Cooper
Goldberg  starred alongside Stephen Collins (1) in Jumpin’ Jack Flash (1986), who came in the tragic love story The Promise (1979), which was later adapted into a novel by Danielle Steel (2), a rarity; as generally films are adapted into movies, but seldom are movies a basis for books; and Steel’s 1988 novel Zoya; a story about a Russian heiress who had to flee from her country,  during the 1917 Russian Revolution; was adapted into a television film, Zoya (1995), in which the titular character was played by Melissa Gilbert (3) who, as a child artiste, acted in the television series Little House on the Prairie (1974-1983), where Michael Landon (4) played her father, and Landon started his career with a bit role in These Wilder Years (1956), starring Barbara Stanwyck (5), who starred alongside Gary Cooper (6) in Ball of Fire (1941).

… Peter Ustinov  
Goldberg  recently was seen as a guest star in quite a few episodes of the musical television comedy series, Glee (2012 – till now), which starred the late Corey Monteith (1) who died three months ago, aged 31, of a drug overdose, and Monteith appeared in Monte Carlo (2011) in which French actor Pierre Boulanger (2) had a small role, and Boulanger, as a childe artiste, starred opposite the legendary Omar Sharif (3) in Monsieur Ibrahim et Les Fleurs du Coran (2003), and Sharif starred in the psychological drama, The Appointment (1969); where he played a man suspecting his wife to be a high-class prostitute; which was directed by Sidney Lumet (4), as was, Murder on the Orient Express (1974), which was based on a mystery novel by Agatha Christie (5), as was Death on the Nile (1978), where the lead sleuth was played by British Born actor; with Russian, German, French, Italian and Ethiopian, aristocratic, roots; Peter Ustinov (6).

Whoopi Goldberg Six Degree connections°
… Romain Duris
Goldberg  played a comical psychic in Ghost (1990), where the ghost was played by Patrick Swayze (1), who starred in The Outsiders (1983), directed by Francis Ford Coppola (2), whose most noteworthy directorial venture happens to be The Godfather trilogy (1972, 1974 & 1990), and in the first Godfather film, Marlon Brando (3) starred as ‘The Godfather’, and in the same year, Brando was seen in the very controversial, Last Tango in Paris (1972), directed by Bernardo Bertolucci (4), who directed French actor Louis Garrel (5) in The Dreamers (2003), and Garrel played brother to Romain Duris (6) in Dans Paris (2006).

…Daniel Radcliffe
Goldberg  played ‘God’ in A Little Bit of Heaven (2011), which starred Mexican actor, Gael García Bernal (1), who played Che Guevara (2) in The Motorcycle Diaries (2004); a movie set before Guevara became a rebel; directed by Walter Salles (3), who directed On The Road (2012); a movie on the post WWII, Beat Generation, of the 40’s & 50’s; where actor Tom Sturridge (4) played famed poet Allen Ginsberg (5), who was portrayed by Daniel Radcliffe (6), in Kill Your Darlings (2013).

… Scott Baio  
Goldberg  played the lead in Steven Spielberg’s (1) The Color Purple (1985), and Spielberg directed Schindler’s List (1993); the real life story, of how one German Businessman, managed to save 1,100 Jewish lives during, the second world war, from being gassed at the ‘Auschwitz’ concentration camp; starring Ben Kinsley (2), who previously starred in the bio-pic, Gandhi (1982); another real life account of a modern day saint, this time set during India’s Freedom struggle, towards the end of the British Raj, in the early 20th century, where an Indian lawyer revolts against British oppression through his philosophy of non-violence; which co-starred Ian Charleson (3), who also came in Chariots of Fire (1981); a film about two athletes competing in the 1924 Olympics; which also had Brad Davis (4), one of whose best work was in the film, Midnight Express (1978), directed by Alan Parker (5); which too was based on a true story; and Parker directed the bio-pic, Bugsy Malone (1976); the real life gangster story with an all child cast playing adult characters; where the titular character was played by Scott Baio (6).

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense ()

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