Tag Archive: Sean Connery


The ❝October Birthdayz❞ Blogathon (Day 3)

Costume Designer, Edith Head, celebrates her birthday with, actor, Mel Ferrer, and his beautiful wife, Audrey Hepburn; at a party hosted for Ferrer and Hepburn, at the Beverly Hills Hotel, in Los Angeles, California (circa. October 1955/1956)

So here are the Participants, for Day 3, of the The ❝October Birthdayz❞ Blogathon, with their contributions :-

  • On Walter Matthau (1st October 1920 – 1st July 2000)
    Paul of Pfeiffer Pfilms and Meg Movies, does an interestingly unique post, one of my personal favourite films ever, the brilliant comedy, Cactus Flower (1969), staring October born, Walter Matthau, along with Ingrid Bergman, Goldie Hawn & Rick Lenz (For Hawn & Lenz; who share a birthday, both being born on November 21st, in different years; Cactus Flower, was their debut movie). What’s unique about Paul‘s post, with his affection for Michelle Pfeiffer and Meg Ryan, is that he does a small analysis of what it would be like if Pfeiffer & Ryan were to replace Bergman & Hawn, respectively, in Goldie, Meg and Matthau, Michelle and Ingrid Bergman too: From Cactus Flower to a Pfantasy Pfeiffer Pfilm
    NSFS
  • On Roger Moore (14th October 1927 – 23rd May 2017)
    Gill at Realweegiemidget, sends in her third and final post for this Blogathon, where she pays tribute to her favourite (and definitely the most good looking, till date) on screen James Bond, Roger Moore, and she also speaks of his non-Bond roles, a parody on his 007 character and a movie she hasn’t seen (i.e. his final performance), in FILM… Remembering When Roger Moore Hit the Bullseye and Moore
    NSFS
  • On the Birth of Cinema with Roundhay Garden Scene (Birth-date: 14th October 1888) & Joseph Ignatius Breen (14th October 1888 – 5th December 1965)
    Tiffany at pure entertainment preservation society, writes a long essay, focusing on; French inventor, Louis Le Prince’s Roundhay Garden Scene (1888), filmed at Oakwood Grange (Le Prince’s in-laws house) in Leeds, West Yorkshire, England, UK, which is believed to be the oldest surviving film in existence; the (till date) unsolved mysterious disappearance of Louis Le Prince, as he was planning to exhibit his ‘moving picture’ invention; and delves deep into the life of, American film Censor, Joseph Ignatius Breen, known for enforcing the Motion Picture Production Code (a.k.a. Hays Code) under Will H. Hays; and Breen’s contributions to the Golden Age of Hollywood. Breen came into this world, in the United States of America, the same day, Roundhay Garden Scene was filmed, in the United Kingdom. Tiffany Brannan discusses all this, and more, in her essay, Clean with Breen: “October 14, 1888: The Birthday of the Motion Picture and Its Greatest Contributor” for “The Second Annual Great Breening Blogathon” & “The October Birthdayz Blogathon” – Tiffany Brannan
    NSFS
  • On All Hallows’ Eve (Birth-date: 31st October circa.1556), Bela Lugosi (20th October 1882 – 16 August 1956), Guillermo del Toro (Born on 9th October 1964), along with a couple of great Horror Giants of Literature & Cinema, who, were not born, but died during this month of Halloween, Edgar Allan Poe (19th January 1809 – 7th October 1849) & Vincent Price (27th May 1911 – 25th October 1993), respectively
    Reut of Moody Moppet, to go with the Horror month of Halloween, speaks of an anthology of Edgar Allan Poe’s macabre literary works, squished into an animated movie, where each story uses a different technique of animation. One segment is narrated by, the now Oscar winning film director, Guillermo del Toro. Another segment uses an archive voice recording from the 40’s, of Bela Lugosi (who shares his birth-date with my sister, 98 years apart) narration of Allan Poe’s short story, The Tell-Tale Heart. And another uses a caricature resembling, the legendary, Vincent Price. Reut Zriri ‏accounts all this under Extraordinary Tales (2013) – The ❝October Birthdayz❞ Blogathon
    NSFS

A Very Big Thank you, to my fellow bloggers, Paul, Reut, Tiffany‏ and Gill, for their contributions for Day 3 of the The ❝October Birthdayz❞ Blogathon. A a special thanks to Gill, for contributing 3 posts, for each day of the Blogathon, even though due to time constraints, she couldn’t do a post especially for this Blogathon, it was very nice of her to send me 3 previous posts, that go well with The ❝October Birthdayz❞ Blogathon.

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense
Nuwan Sen n’ Style

P.S. Also see the participants and contributions, for Day 1 & Day 2, in my posts, The ❝October Birthdayz❞ Blogathon (DAY 1) and The ❝October Birthdayz❞ Blogathon (DAY 2), respectively.

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Happy New Year 2017

Wishing all my fellow Bloggers a Peaceful, stress free and Happy; New Year, for YEAR 2017!!!

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Sean Connery

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Out of the Se7en, Suave n’ Sophisticated Gentlemen pictured above, which is your favourite photograph??? And can you guess all seven classily dressed people above????

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense
#‎NuwanSensFilmSense

P.S. Today also happens to be ’s 1st Official Birthday!! Plus (Atta) my maternal Grandfather’s, 97th Birth Anniversary!!

Nuwan Sen ❤

Finally here they are, the correct answers to the Hitchcock quiz from March 2015 (Question Time # 008: HITCHCOCK !!!!!)

A.1 1940 Film

Joan Fontaine, Laurence Olivier, Gladys Cooper & Reginald Denny in a scene from Rebecca (1940)

L to R: Joan Fontaine, Laurence Olivier, Gladys Cooper & Reginald Denny in a scene from Rebecca (1940)

(i) The still is from Rebecca (1940), based on the 1938 novel, Rebecca, by Daphne du Maurier.
(ii) The correct statements are:-
(e) This was Hitchcock’s first Oscar nomination, for ‘Best Director’.
(h) This was Hitchcock’s first Hollywood movie.
(j) This was Hitchcock’s first Oscar winning film, for ‘Best Picture’.
(iii) Joan Fontaine plays the nameless character in the movie. Judith Anderson plays the icy ‘Mrs. Danvers’, to eerie perfection.
(iv) It was Sir Laurence Olivier, who received a knighthood, in 1947.
(v) Joan Fontaine was born in Japan, on 22nd October 1917. She passed away on the 15th of December, 2013, aged 96 (see my post Happy 96th Birthday: Joan Fontaine from 22nd October 2013).

A.2 Film 46’
(i) Notorious (1946), contains the longest kiss, and one of the most romantic kisses ever (of 2½ minutes), between Cary Grant & Ingrid Bergman, in history of cinema.
(ii) It’s Ingrid Bergman, as ‘Alicia Huberman’, who is used as a modern day Mata Hari, by the Americans.
(iii) It is Alicia Huberman (Bergman), who is slowly poisoned daily, in small doses, through her coffee, by her husband, Alex Sebastian (played by Claude Rains), and her mother-in-law, Madame Anna Sebastian (played by Leopoldine Konstantin). The slow poisoning act, through coffee, is Madame Anna Sebastian’s brainchild.

A.3 British Original & Hollywood Remake

Left: The original (Black & White) British film from 1934. Right: The Hollywood colour remake from 1956.

Left: The original (Black & White) British film from 1934.
Right: The Hollywood colour remake from 1956.

(i) The movies pictured above are both named The Man Who Knew Too Much. The original British film is from 1934, and the Hollywood remake from 1956.
(ii) The song Que Sera Sera, appeared in the 1956 version, and was sung by Doris Day.
(iii) Yes, Que Sera Sera won the Oscar for ‘Best Song’  in 1957.
(iv) In the 1934 version, the family are on vacation, in Switzerland. No, in the Hollywood re-make the family holiday is set in Morocco.
(v) The gender of the child that gets kidnapped is :-
(a) Female in the 1934 movie
(b) Male in the 1956 film

A.4 Young Alfred Hitchcock & the Silent era

Young Hitchcock(i) The young girl standing behind Hitchcock in the picture is Alma Reville, his wife and collaborator. As the saying goes, “Behind every successful man there is a Woman (telling him he’s  wrong 🙂 )”.
(ii) The Pleasure Garden (1925), was the very first, completed, feature film, made by Alfred Hitchcock.
(iii) Mr. & Mrs. Smith (1941) was the only light-hearted Romantic/Screwball comedy, Hitchcock made in America.
(iv) The Short Night, should have been Alfred Hitchcock’s last film, but the project was cancelled in 1979, due to his ill health. The film never got beyond the early pre-production stage.

A.5 Colour & Hitchcoerotism

Rope Lovers:  John Dall and Farley Granger

Rope Lovers: John Dall and Farley Granger

(i) Rope (1948). Yes, it was Hitchcock’s first film in colour.
(ii) Rope is loosely based on the notorious ‘Leopold and Loeb’ case of 1924. Nathan Leopold Jr. and Richard Albert Loeb, two wealthy students at the University of Chicago, kidnapped and murdered a 14 year old boy, Robert (Bobby) Franks, in 1924. The duo killed young Bobby, to prove their intellectual superiority.

A.6 Hitchcock & the surrealist artist

Nuwan Sen’s ART Sense  Nuwan Sen’s NOIR Sense

Nuwan Sen’s ART Sense
Nuwan Sen’s NOIR Sense

(i) This famous surreal dream sequence is from Spellbound (1945), and surrealist artist, Salvador Dalí, was responsible for this beautiful creation. Of course the original dream sequence was about 20 minutes long, but being too lengthy, it was cut during editing, and only 2 minutes appear in the final film. I’d love to see the original footage, of 20 minutes. It could be a short film in itself.
(ii) Gregory Peck and Ingrid Bergman star as two psychoanalysts. It is Gregory Peck’s character, who suffers from a phobia.

A.7 Hitchcock 007
(i) Sean Connery stars, as the male lead, in Hitchcock’s Marnie (1964).
(ii) Sean Connery appeared in Marnie, after the release of the first two films from the James Bond franchise, Dr. No (1962) and From Russia with Love (1963).

A.8 Hitchcockian Train Journey’s

TOP: Dame May Whitty, Margaret Lockwood & Michael Redgrave in the 1938 noir classic. BELOW: Farley Granger & Robert Walker in the 1951 Highsmith adaptation.

TOP: Dame May Whitty, Margaret Lockwood & Michael Redgrave in the 1938 noir classic.
BELOW: Farley Granger & Robert Walker in the 1951 Highsmith adaptation.

(i) & (ii) The stills are from, the British film, The Lady Vanishes (1938), and the Hollywood classic, Strangers on a Train (1951).
(iii) Strangers on a Train was based on a novel by Patricia Highsmith.

A.9 Rebecca (1940). Why? See my critiques under lists No Name (20th October 2011), Joan Fontaine (1940 & the 40’s) ‘TOP FIVE’ (April 2012) and Why I love …. (November/December 2012) on IMDB.
Hitch Rebecca
A.10 Psycho (1960)

Two months too late. Sorry for the delay, for a lot has happened since I did the questionnaire, thus didn’t have time to work on it. So today, I practically took part in the quiz myself.
Thank you fellow Bloggers, for giving up your valuable time, to take part in this quiz, related to my all time favourite director.

Nuwan Sen n’ Film Noir
Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense
Nuwan Sen’s Hitchcockian Sense

Alfred Hitchcock, known as the master of suspense, was one of the greatest film directors ever. He started his career during the silent era, and completed it towards the end of the hippie era, even working, close to his demise. From Silent movies to talkies, from British films to Hollywood, from eerie love stories to crime, from classy film noir to B-movie horror, he’s done it all (Sometimes even blending all the genres into one). Nobody can dispute the fact he was a true genius, and one of the most talented and versatile (yet unique) personalities to have ever existed. And no doubt, nobody can call themselves a true film buff, if they lack Hitchcockian knowledge.

So here is my Hitchcockian Questionnaire. Play along and enjoy.

Q.1 1940 Film

Laurence Olivier, Joan Fontaine & Reginald Denny from this haunting classic from 1940.

Laurence Olivier, Joan Fontaine & Reginald Denny in a scene from this haunting classic from 1940.

(i) From which film; and based on which novel, by which author; is the above still from?

(ii) This was a ‘First’, in more than one category, for Alfred Hitchcock. Which three lines from below are correct :-

(a) This was Hitchcock’ s first Silent Movie.
(b) This was Hitchcock’s first Talkie.
(c) This was Hitchcock’s first Musical.
(d) This was Hitchcock’s first British film.
(e) This was Hitchcock’s first Oscar nomination, for ‘Best Director’.
(f) This was Hitchcock’s first film as an actor.
(g) This was Hitchcock’s first Bollywood movie.
(h) This was Hitchcock’s first Hollywood movie.
(i) This was Hitchcock’s first directorial venture.
(j) This was Hitchcock’s first Oscar winning film, for ‘Best Picture’.

*Remember, only three, of the above ten, statements, is correct.

(iii) Which one, of the three actors, pictured in the still, plays a nameless character, in this movie? Who plays the icy ‘Mrs. Danvers’ (not pictured)?

(iv) Which actor, from the still, was given a knighthood, in 1947?

(v) Which actor, from the trio pictured, was born in Japan, and died on 15th of December, 2013, aged 96?

Q.2 Film 46’

Cary Grant & Ingrid Bergman's 2½ minute kiss.

Cary Grant & Ingrid Bergman’s 2½ minute kiss.

(i) Which Hitchcockian film, pictured above, contains the longest notorious kiss (2½ minutes), in history of cinema? (HINT: Clue in the question itself)

(ii) Which of the two actors, in the picture above, plays a modern day, post World War – II, Mata Hari?

(iii) Which one, of the two characters shown, is slowly poisoned, through his/her coffee, daily, in the film, and by whom?

Q.3 British Original & Hollywood Remake

Peter Lorre (in the 1934 British Original),  Doris Day & James Stewart (in the 1956 Hollywood Re-make)

Peter Lorre (in the 1934 British Original), Doris Day & James Stewart (in the 1956 Hollywood Re-make)

(i) What’s the title of the two movies (pictured here), which was originally made by Hitchcock in the United Kingdom, and released in 1934; and later re-made by Hitchcock again, in the United States, and released in 1956.

(ii) Which film version, 1934 or 1956, was the song Que Sera Sera from?

(iii) Did the Doris Day song, from the 1956 version, win the Oscar for ‘Best Song’  in 1957?

(iv) In which country, are the family on vacation, in the 1934 film? Is the family holiday, in the Hollywood re-make, set in the same country as well?

(v) What’s the gender of the child that gets kidnapped in the :-
(a) 1934 version
(b) 1956 version

Q.4 Young Alfred Hitchcock & the Silent era
Young Hitchcock(i) Who is the young girl standing behind Hitchcock, in this picture? What is her relationship to him?

(ii) What was the very first, completed, feature film, made by Alfred Hitchcock, and which year was it released?

(iii) Hitchcock made only one light-hearted Romantic/Screwball comedy in America, what was it called?

(iv) What’s the name of the film that would have been the last film release of Alfred Hitchcock, but was cancelled in 1979, due to his ill health?

Q.5 Colour & Hitchcoerotism

Farley Granger & John Dall play partners in life & crime, in this homoerotic 1948 classic.

Farley Granger & John Dall play partners in life & crime, in this homoerotic 1948 classic.

(i) From which movie, is the above picture from? One of Hitchcock’s most experimental films, set in real time, was it also his first colour film?

(ii) This 1948 movie, was Alfred Hitchcock’s first depiction of Homosexuality, though only hinted on the subject matter, which real-life notorious scandal was this movie based on?

Q.6 Hitchcock & the surrealist artist
Dalí Spellbound(i) From which film, is this surreal dream sequence from, and who was the famous artist, who created these sets?

(ii) Who are the two lead stars of this psychological thriller, set in a mental asylum, who play two psychoanalysts? Which one is suffering from a phobia?

Q.7 Hitchcock 007

Tippi Hedren & Sean Connery (in a film from 1964)

Tippi Hedren & Sean Connery (in a film from 1964)

(i) In which Hitchcockian film, did Sean Connery, act in?

(ii) Did Connery appear in this film, before or after, he started acting in the James Bond franchise?

Q.8 Hitchcockian Train Journey’s

TOP: Dame May Whitty, Margaret Lockwood & Michael Redgrave in the 1938 noir classic. BELOW: Farley Granger & Robert Walker in the 1951 Highsmith adaptation.

TOP: Dame May Whitty, Margaret Lockwood & Michael Redgrave in the 1938 noir classic.
BELOW: Farley Granger & Robert Walker in the 1951 noir Highsmith adaptation.

(i) From which two films, where the train is significant to the plot, are the two above stills from?

(ii) Which of them is a British film, and which, a Hollywood venture?

(iii) Which of them was based on a Patricia Highsmith novel?

Q.9 Which is your favourite Hitchcock film, and why?

Q.10 Which of these, from Hitchcock’s two B-movie Horror films, Psycho (1960) and The Birds (1963), is your favourite?  

Nuwan Sen n’ Film Noir
Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense
Nuwan Sen’s Hitchcockian Sense

Welcome to The Essential 60’s Blogathon.

Inspired by many a Blogathon’s hosted by various bloggers in recent times, I decided to start one of my own. So let’s celebrate the next 21 days of September 2014, with the Swinging Sizzling Sixties.
60's Main Pic for BlogathonThe Essential 60’s

The 1960’s, an era well before my time, was one of the most fashionable, elegant, eras of the 20th century, when the world changed for the better, with youth rebellions, feminism, the hippies, black pride movements and gay pride movements. It’s thanks to the 60’s we live a freer life today, or rather we should, in a more open minded society. So here’s to the 1960’s decade, with massive hairdo’s (the bouffant), tight pants and micro-mini skirts.

So fellow bloggers, please do take part in The Essential 60’s Blogathon, by choosing a film, or two, or more, released anywhere between 1961 and 2014, that is set in the 1960’s, and writing a small (or big) critique about it (Please let me know before hand the movie you’ve chosen), on your own blog (please pass on the link as a comment here, once you finish the post). Since the setting should be the 60’s, it doesn’t have to be a movie released in the 60’s only. And even among the movies released in the 60’s, if the setting isn’t the 60’s, those movies aren’t part of this Blogathon. Thus any movie, that is set in the 60’s, be it released in the 60’s, or post, are welcome. Added to that, please choose one of the Polaroid style photographs below (made by me), out of the six provided, and add it at the end of your post.

Kindly blog about the films you choose for this Blogathon, by the 30th of September, this year.

Thanking you
Nuwan Sen (Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense)
Of ‘No Nonsense with Nuwan Sen’

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Pictures inspired by Polaroid’s

60’s a.     Scene from Blow-Up (1966)
60's a60’s b.     Peter Fonda in Easy Rider (1969)
60's b60’s c.     Sixties Styles with Audrey Hepburn I
60's c60’s d.     Sixties Styles with Audrey Hepburn II
60's d60’s e.     Bollywood and the styles of the 60’s
60's e60’s f.     Carey Mulligan and Peter Sarsgaard in Paris, in a scene from
An Education (2009), a movie set in the 60’s.

60's f

List of Bloggers taking part and the films they’ll critique.

Nuwan Sen – Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)

Cindy Bruchman The Hustler (1961)

Roger Poladopoulos (A Guy without Boxers)The Boys In The Band (1970)

Halim – Down with Love (2003)

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense
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One of my favourite film directors, Richard Samuel Attenborough, died on Sunday 24th of August, 2014, less than a week away from his 91st Birthday. He was the older brother of Sir David Attenborough, a naturalist and broadcaster, and John Attenborough. John Attenborough died in November 2012.
Richard AttenboroughBaron Attenborough was born in the beautiful city of Cambridge, in the county town of Cambridgeshire, England, United Kingdom; on the 29th of August, 1923. Born into an intellectual and heroic family; his mother was a founding member of the Marriage Guidance Council, and his father a scholar and academic administrator who was a fellow at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and wrote a standard text on Anglo-Saxon law; Richard Attenborough’s parents saved two Jewish girls during the Second World War and later adopted them once they discovered the girls’ parent’s were killed off. Richard Attenborough served in the Royal Air Force (RAF), during the Second World War. Soon he joined the RAF Film Unit at Pinewood Studios, where in 1943, he worked with Edward G. Robinson in the propaganda film, Journey Together (1945). The Acting bug hit him, whilst still serving in the Air Force (where he sustained permanent ear damage), and the rest is history.

I fell in love with the biographical epic tear-jerker Gandhi (1982), when I watched it as a child in the early-mid 1980’s. And as we had the video tape of Gandhi, at home, I have watched it a zillion times since then. Plus, when I was studying for my M.A. in International Cinema (2002-2003); at the University of Luton, Luton, UK; I got a chance to study this, three hour long, great epic, scene by scene. It was for my mini-dissertation, titled Historical, Heritage and Hackneyed Cinema: British and Hollywood Cinema set in early twentieth Century India, of 10,330 words, in my second semester. Gandhi was a movie that fell under ‘Historical Cinema’, where I did an analysis of racial tension (under the chapter White Bred over Brown Bred: Colonial Relations), the significance of land, specifically the ‘Train’ in Gandhi (under the chapter Landscape and it’s significance), and a character psychoanalysis (under the chapter Gender & Sexuality). Gender & Sexuality was the most crucial chapter in my mini-dissertation, which paved the way, to do a complete psychoanalysis on gender, for my final dissertation (on Hitchcockian Cinema) of 25,000 to 30,000 words, in my final semester.

Richard Attenborough and actor Ben Kingsley at the Oscars, in 1983. With their wins for Best Picture, Best Director & Best Actor, for GANDHI (1982).

Richard Attenborough and actor Ben Kingsley at the Oscars, in 1983.
With their wins for Best Picture, Best Director & Best Actor, for GANDHI (1982).

Attenborough’s directorial epic, Gandhi, is no doubt the best film to come out of the 1980’s (see my post My Favourite movie by decade, My Favourite Oscar Winner per decade from March 2014). The movie was based on the non-violent struggle of Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, India’s peace activist and modern day saint, who, during the British Raj, drove away the British colonist, by hurting their conscience, instead of acting against them through violence. Of course the movie depicts him as a perfectionist, but he was a human being, and no human being is perfect. He had his little flaws, yet he was a truly great human being. Gandhi deservedly won eight Oscars (out the eleven nominated for) in 1983, including for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Original Screenplay and Best Cinematography, among others. Gandhi won over 40 other awards in various other award functions (in various categories), including at the BAFTA’s and the Golden Globes.

Richard Attenborough’s acting career began on stage, where he met his future wife, stage actress Sheila Sim, with whom he appeared on the West End production of Agatha Christie’s The Mousetrap. This production led to the two falling in love and they were married in 1945. And they were happily married until Attenborough’s death on Sunday. Sheila Sim is currently suffering from senile dementia, which she was diagnosed with back in June 2012, just after her 90th Birthday. Richard Attenborough, who also attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, remained a Patron until his death.

Richard Attenborough with Laura Dern and Sam Neill in a scene from JURASSIC PARK (1993)

Richard Attenborough with Laura Dern and Sam Neill in a scene from JURASSIC PARK (1993)

As a teenager, in New Delhi, in 1994, I watched Steven Spielberg’s Jurassic Park (1993), on video tape, and later on the Big Screen, within that year. I thought it was a really good Sci-fi, B-movie. And I loved the way Attenborough’s character, Prof. John Hammond, explains the process of extracting blood (Dinosaur DNA) from a mosquito that had been preserved in amber fossil. At that age, DNA extraction and cloning really impressed me, something I learned as a kid in school in the late 80’s. The rest of the film was a visually spectacular drama, loved the CGI of the time, especially the creations of pre-historic animals, but what I found the most amazing was Prof. Hammond’s detailed explanation. I wasn’t so crazy about the sequels, The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997) and Jurassic Park III (2001), though. Yet I wouldn’t mind checking out the latest instalment, Jurassic World, which is yet to be released.
Richard Attenborough z Brighton Rock  (1947)Richard Attenborough starred in a lot of great movies throughout the 40’s, 50’s and 60’s, including In Which we Serve (1942), Brighton Rock (1947), The Man Within (1947), The Guinea Pig (1948), Boys in Brown (1949), Eight O’Clock Walk (1954), SOS Pacific (1959), The Angry Silence (1960), The Dock Brief (1962), The Great Escape (1963), The Flight of the Phoenix (1965), Doctor Dolittle (1967) and The Magic Christian (1969) with Ringo Starr of ‘The Beatles’, to name a few out of zillion he’s starred in. Brighton Rock, The Great Escape, The Flight of the Phoenix, Doctor Dolittle, 10 Rillington Place (1971), Jurassic Park and Miracle on 34th Street (1994), are amongst his most popular films as an actor. I have a vague memory of watching The Great Escape as a little kid, but am unsure. Anyway, I re-watched it more recently and loved it too. This excellent flick, based on a true story, is about several escape attempts by allied prisoners of war from a German POW camp, during World War – II.

In the late 60’s, Richard Attenborough, made his directorial debut, with the musical, Oh! What a Lovely War (1969). His next directorial venture was Young Winston (1972).
Richard Attenborough Young WinstonIn England, in 2002-2003, I watched Attenborough’s previous biographical epic, Young Winston (1972), at the University Library. This movie deals with former British Prime Minister, Winston Churchill’s, younger days, stationed in India and Sudan, as a cavalry officer. I really enjoyed it. Though no where near as great as Attenborough’s magnum opus, that was Gandhi, Young Winston was still a pretty good movie.

Besides Young Winston and Gandhi, as a director, Richard Attenborough, brought out some amazing biographical epics, like A Bridge Too Far (1977); about an unsuccessful Allied military operation, fought in the Netherlands and Germany during World War – II; Cry Freedom (1987); based on the life and death of prominent anti-apartheid activist Steve Biko; Chaplin (1992); on film genius, Sir Charles Chaplin, a.k.a. Charlie Chaplin; Shadowlands (1993); on the heart-rending love story between Oxford academic C. S. Lewis and American poet Joy Davidman, and her tragic death from cancer; In Love and War (1996) on Ernest Hemingway’s experiences during the First World War; and Grey Owl (1999), another bio-pic, this time about Archibald Belaney, a.k.a. Grey Owl, who was a British schoolboy who turned into an Indian trapper, and called himself ‘Grey Owl’.

Richard Attenborough didn’t just make bio-pics, he made a few out and out fictional movies as well, and his last film was Closing the Ring (2007).

Richard Attenborough zfilms Down Under, in Sydney, in 2008, I watched Closing the Ring (2007), on the Big Screen, Attenborough’s last venture. Pretty Good but far from great. Starring Shirley MacLaine, Christopher Plummer, Mischa Barton, Stephen Amell, Neve Campbell, Pete Postlethwaite and Brenda Fricker. The biggest mistake Attenborough did, was to take in the muscular pretty boy, Stephen Amell, who can’t act for peanuts. He just voiced the dialogues expressionlessly, like a pretty mannequin, a Barbie doll. The story was interesting enough though, set during the Second World War (in flashbacks) and the 1990’s; set in Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK and Michigan, USA. Towards the end, it becomes a bit cheesy and overtly melodramatic. But still an enjoyable enough watch, thanks to the veteran actors in it.

A sad loss, with the death of a British gem, Richard Attenborough. Day after tomorrow, 29th August, 2014, would be his 91st Birth anniversary. He’ll be remembered forever through his great works. May he rest in peace.

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense

I discovered Sidney Lumet films, pretty late in the day, for a film buff, though I was aware of some of his more famous work, since my teenage years. Some of the first films of his I watched were about a decade ago, The Appointment (1969), Serpico (1973), Murder on the Orient express (1974) and Dog Day Afternoon (1975). And the most recent movie of his I watched was, his feature length directorial debut, 12 Angry Men (1957).
Sidney LumetBeginnings
Sidney Lumet was born in Philadelphia, USA, on the 25th of June, 1924, to two veterans of the ‘Yiddish Theatre’. Thus, dramatic arts being in their bloodline, Lumet was lucky enough to be born into such a family. Lumet’s father was a Polish Jewish emigrant to the United States. Lumet’s mother died when he was still a child.

Sidney Lumet made his debut on Radio at the age of four, and by five he was already working on stage, as part of the ‘Yiddish Theatre’ group. Soon he was working on Broadway plays, and by eleven he starred in his first film, a short film called Papirossen (1935). At fifteen, he appeared on the feature film, One Third of a Nation (1939). But soon his acting career came to a standstill with the Second World War and him coming of age, and he was stationed in India and Burma as a radar repairmen between 1942 and 1946. On his return to the States, he formed an Off-Broadway theatre group, and became it’s director. Soon he evolved into being a highly respectable Television director. But it was only in his 30’s that he got to finally direct his very first feature film, 12 Angry Men (1957).
Sidney Lumet's 12 Angry MenSidney Lumet & Social Realism
I watched 12 Angry Men (1957), Lumet’s first big screen directorial venture, just late last month, when it was shown; projected on to a not so big – big screen; at the Ethnic Centre here. 12 Angry Men is about 12 angry jurors, headed by Henry Fonda.

A young Hispanic man is on trial for the murder of his intolerable father. As the juror’s are locked up in the room, to discuss the case, we find 11 of the juror’s having already made up their mind that the kid is guilty, except for one, Henry Fonda. It’s interesting to watch how effectively Fonda’s character creates doubt in each juror’s mind, and turns them one by one to agreeing with him on a ‘Not Guilty’ verdict, in this highly intellectualised film. A very intriguing character study of 12 varied unnamed men (simply known as Juror. #1, Juror. #2, Juror. #3 et al), stuck inside a room on a very hot day, with their temperatures rising to near boiling point. The film was nominated for three Oscars, including for ‘Best Picture’ and ‘Best Director’.

Beautifully directed, it’s a bridge between art cinema and a commercial venture, which veers more towards art cinema. Yet, Lumet never liked to make his films too artsy, but at the same time wasn’t interested in making an overtly decorated, visually appealing, meaningless film either. He liked a social message input, he loved realism, yet the kind that people would enjoy watching. Lumet abided by a good script, great dialogues and superb performances from his actors, testing them to the limits, rather than action.

I had seen the latter remake (1997 version) of this movie starring Jack Lemmon, George C. Scott, Edward James Olmos and Tony Danza, about a decade or so ago. Which too was a very good television adaptation. But the Lumet classic was a magnificent piece of social realism. In fact Sidney Lumet is known for films on Social Realism. Take Network (1976) for instance.

Faye Dunaway, on the phone, in a scene from, NETWORK

Faye Dunaway, on the phone, in a scene from, NETWORK (1976)

I watched Network, down under, in Sydney, back in 2008, when it was shown at the ‘Art Gallery of New South Wales’. We (my friends and I) use to  go and watch some great classic, and foreign language, movies at this Art Gallery in Sydney, while I resided there (2006-2008). Network is a fascinating tale of media manipulation (electronic media in this case) to get what they want. They’d do anything possible, to the extent of being inhumane to gain higher ratings for their show. The movie, staring Faye Dunaway, William Holden, Robert Duvall and Peter Finch, shows how an ageing anchor, when fired, reacts in a strange way, and ends up being a martyr of sorts exploited by the television industry. The movie was nominated for 10 Oscars, and took home 4 trophies. Peter Finch was the first actor to win the ‘Best Actor’ award posthumously at the Academy Awards.

Network is a brilliant insight into media lifestyle, and my favourite Lumet film till date. Network was the second last Sidney Lumet film I watched until I saw 12 Angry Men, end of last month.

In 2007, while studying in Sydney, Australia, I watched Equus (1977), at my University (UNSW) library. Another superb character analysis here, with Richard Burton playing a psychiatrist trying to make sense of teenage boy’s unhealthy attraction towards horses. The boy, played by Peter Firth, finds sexual satisfaction through grooming horses and riding them in the nude. Yet one day in rage he blinds six horses in a stable. In early 2007, the play, by Peter Shaffer, which this movie is based on, was in the talks, as Daniel Radcliffe was performing the role of the teenage boy obsessed with horses, for a stage version, on the other side of the ocean. Soon I knew I had to check this film out, and it was truly worth it.

Richard Burton does a superb job as the psychiatrist, who ends up envying the young man, for the youngster finds more pleasure through horses, than the shrink has ever done in his life. Equus was nominated for 3 Oscars.
Sidney Lumet's Murder on the Orient ExpressLumet’s take on Agatha Christie
One of the first Lumet movies I watched was, Murder on the Orient Express (1974), just over a decade ago, whilst living in Oslo, Norway. Based on an Agatha Christie novel, this was a brilliant adaptation with a great star cast of legendary actors including Lauren Bacall, Ingrid Bergman and Albert Finney to name a few. The whole movie set in a train, Pre-World War-II, where one of the passengers included, the famed fictional Belgian detective, Hercule Poirot (Albert Finney). A business tycoon (Richard Widmark), has been killed, stabbed 12 times, and everyone has a motive. The suspects include a great glamorous star cast, with the who’s who of cinema. Lauren Bacall, Ingrid Bergman, Vanessa Redgrave, John Gielgud, Michael York, Sean Connery, Anthony Perkins and Jacqueline Bisset. Ingrid Bergman won the ‘Best Supporting Actress’ Oscar, the movie altogether was nominated for six awards.

Around the same time I also watched Lumet’s The Appointment (1969). Just don’t recall whether I watched in Norway or in England, UK. The Appointment, starring Omar Sharif and French actress Anouk Aimée, was a moderately good movie, set in Rome, about a husband who suspects his innocent wife of being a high-class prostitute, with tragic consequences.
The Appointment was nominated for the ‘Palme d’Or’ at the Cannes Film Festival in 1969.

Al Pacino Sidney Lumet films

Lumet works with Al Pacino
Around the same time, 10 years ago, in 2004, I watched Serpico (1973) and Dog Day Afternoon (1975), on the small screen, while living in Portsmouth, England, UK. Both starring Al Pacino, and both based on a true story. Serpico is a brilliant film, where Pacino plays a real life heroic cop, NYPD officer Frank Serpico, who went undercover to expose corruption in the police force. Dog Day Afternoon is a fictionalised story about an actual Brooklyn Bank robbery that took place in 1972, during the hot ‘sultry dog days of summer’. Both films were nominated in various categories at the Academy Awards, and Serpico took home no Oscars, including the ‘Best Actor’ trophy for Al Pacino, while Dog Day Afternoon bagged one but both Pacino and Lumet lost out on their consecutive awards yet again.

Christopher Reeve in DEATHTRAP (1982)

Christopher Reeve in DEATHTRAP (1982)

Lumet works with his daughter, Jenny
Sidney Lumet cast his writer daughter in three movies, including Deathtrap (1982), Running on Empty (1988) and Q & A (1990). Am yet to watch any of these movies.

Lumet’s last work
I watched Lumet’s last film, Before the Devil knows You’re Dead (2007), early on in 2008, on the big screen, in Sydney, Australia. By now Philip Seymour Hoffman, even more popular, post his Oscar win for Capote (2005), played the lead in this tragic cinematic piece of excellence.

Ethan Hawke and Marisa Tomei in a scene from BEFORE THE DEVIL KNOWS YOU'RE DEAD (2007)

Ethan Hawke and Marisa Tomei in a scene from BEFORE THE DEVIL KNOWS YOU’RE DEAD (2007)

Most probably the most out and out commercial venture made by Sidney Lumet. And not necessarily as great as many of his classics, but still an excellently well made movie. Before the Devil knows You’re Dead, is about two brothers who decide to rob their own parents jewellery store, yet hoping to make it a victimless crime. But there is no such thing as a perfect crime, thus things go haywire and their mother, who gets shot, falls into a coma. The movie has a great cast, besides Seymour Hoffman, it also stars Ethan Hawke, Albert Finney, Marisa Tomei, and Rosemary Harris. Unfortunately, a talented actress like Marisa Tomei, is wasted in this movie. She’s used as nothing but a sex object, sharing a bed between two brothers. Married to one, and having affair with other.

Lumet classics am yet to watch
Besides Deathtrap (1982), Running on Empty (1988) and Q & A (1990),  there are so many of his films am yet to watch including, Stage Struck (1958), That Kind of Woman (1959), The Fugitive Kid (1959), View from the Bridge (1961), Long Day’s journey into Night (1962), The Hill (1965), The Anderson Tapes (1971), The Verdict (1982), Garbo Talks (1984), The Morning After (1986), A Stranger Among Us (1992), Guilty as Sin (1993), Night Falls on Manhattan (1997), Strip Search (2004), Find Me Guilty (2006) and much much more.

Night falls on Manhattan

Though Lumet was nominated many a times for various films, he never won an Oscar. But he did receive an Honorary Academy Award for ‘Lifetime Achievement’ in 2005.
He was also nominated twice at the Cannes Film Festival.
Altogether 14 of his films were nominated at the Oscars in various categories, and some of his films, made in the 70’s, took home more than one Oscar.

Sidney Lumet died, aged 86, of Lymphoma, on 9th April 2011. As soon as I heard of this, I paid tribute to the great director by making a ‘Set of 7’ list on IMDB, along with seven mini critiques (see my list Sidney Lumet: Set of Seven on IMDB).

Day before yesterday was Sidney Lumet’s 90th Birth Anniversary.

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense

We all know that Alfred Hitchcock had a penchant for blondes, yet he had wanted to actually work with Audrey Hepburn. Now it’s been confirmed, that he had actually started work on a film, back in the mid-1950’s, starring Audrey Hepburn in the lead, set in Paris, but the film never got completed. The film was temporarily titled, The Mysterious Disappearance of a Bride-to-be.

Audrey Hepburn Hitchcock

The Synopsis
To start off, the blonde victim in this movie, for change was not a female character, like in most Hitchcock films, but a male. None other than Roger Moore (a virtual unknown at the time) in a brief appearance, whose character gets killed off just the night before his wedding. Elizabeth Taylor too has a cameo as Moore’s fiancée.
The plot deals with Audrey Hepburn, playing detective, after her best friend (Elizabeth Taylor), goes missing hours after Moore’s character’s death. After going through a cornucopia of mysterious events, Hepburn’s character discovers that the puzzling trail leads back to none other than both, Hepburn’s character’s own ex-husband and current husband (supposedly to be played by Gregory Peck and Anthony Perkins, respectively).

Roger Moore Hitchcock

Elizabeth Taylor Hitchcock

Unfortunately the film couldn’t be completed in the 50’s, and by 1963 Hitchcock wanted to re-start the project, after completing The Birds (1963), and Hepburn having finished working on Charade (1963), and Taylor on Cleopatra (1963). Due to various other commitments, both the raven haired beauties had to decline the offer. Thus Hitchcock went on to work on his next project, Marnie (1964), with Sean Connery and Tippi Hedren. A pity, otherwise this spy thriller would have made for an enjoyable piece of Cinema.
The film footage was located in a vault of a retired American Professor, residing in Paris. Of course by now, some of you might have guessed that this is a story I concocted, for today, April fools day. And some of you might not have been so clever. I wish for the latter. Ha!! Happy April Fools Day.

Cheers
Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense
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Nouveau Bond Birthday

The latest Bond, Daniel Craig, turns 45 today.

Born on the 2nd of March

Birthdays

of (from collage above) :-

Film Personalities

Jennifer Jones (1919-2009) star of The Song of Bernadette (1943), Desi Arnaz (1917-1986) of I Love Lucy (1951-1957) fame, Daniel Craig, Bryce Dallas Howard (Daughter of director Ron Howard, whose B’day was yesterday) of The Help (2011) and Ethan Peck (Grandson of actor Gregory Peck) from In Time (2011).

Author

John Irving (novelist/screenplay writer) of The Cider House Rules (1999).

Musicians

Chris Martin (of the band Coldplay) and rocker Jon Bon Jovi.

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I came across Daniel Craig back in the 1990’s when I watched Shekhar Kapur’s Elizabeth (1998) and I Dreamed of Africa (2000), but I didn’t know him back then, forgot such a person existed. I first really noticed him when I watched Road to Perdition (2002) a decade ago in Oslo. Soon, the following year, I saw a number of his films when I was residing in England, such as the television movie The Ice House (1997), and other big screen wonders shown on the small screen like Love Is the Devil: Study for a Portrait of Francis Bacon (1998) and Enduring Love (2004). These last two movies, where in one he played Francis Bacon’s  lover & muse, and an object of an obsessive desire in the other, proved what a great actor he was. Soon I saw him in movies like Sylvia (2003), Munich (2005), Casino Royale (2006), Infamous (2006) and Defiance (2008). I think he is among the best actors today.

007   y==– – – –  –   –    –    –

Casino Royale (2006) came out when I was living in Sydney, 2006. I really wasn’t that keen on watching it, ’cause I hadn’t been a fan of the Bond series (post-90’s), which were dependant more on the special effects than the plot, and like most movies today it’s the CGI (Computer generated Imagery) that overpowers the movie, completely ruining it, worse when it’s added with a lot of pretty faces that can’t act. None of the Bond movies I’ve seen have been among the best movies ever made, so far I am concerned, but the 1990’s Pierce Brosnon ones were the worst ever. So December of 2006, during the height of a heaty summer down under, Casino Royale (2006) was released there. A flatmate of mine watched it and she loved it. Meanwhile the original Casino Royale (1967); dubbed the non-Bond Bond movie, starring David Niven (whose B’day was yesterday) and Peter Sellers (both playing Bond), Woody Allen playing the villain and a stellar cast of gorgeous fem fatale’s including Deborah Kerr, Ursula Andress and Jacqueline Bisset, to name a few; was shown on television. I wasn’t crazy about this comical version, even though some parts were genuinely hilarious, but some jokes were getting pretty stale and the movie seemed to drag on a bit. Thus it’s a Oky Doky movie, but worth checking out for a die hard Bond fan, and any movie buff. After all, it’s one of those not so great films that actually has some really good actors, thus making it watchable.

Anyway the following year I ended watching the new Casino Royale (2006), loved it, except for the first two long unnecessary chases. To me the movie started, just before Eva Green’s entrance, where M (Judi Dench) tells Bond about the poker game. And last year I read Ian Fleming’s Casino Royale, the novel. Neither movies are anything like the book. But I do love the newer Casino Royale (2006).

Note: Lana Wood, child star of the 50’s, whose B’day way yesterday as well, was a Bond girl as well. She appeared Diamonds Are Forever (1971) with the original Bond, Sean Connery.

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense