Tag Archive: Spy thriller


To and fro Australia, I got to watch a few of the latest film releases, in mid air, on the tiny little screen. Here is the run down.
InFlight FilmsBoyhood (2014)
I watched Boyhood (2014), on the 2nd/3rd of November 2014, mostly on the Emirates flight, from Colombo to Singapore, and the latter bit in the Qantas flight from Singapore to Sydney. (See my post Holidaying in South Australia)

12 years in the making, taking a big risk, film director Richard Linklater has brought out an exceptional piece of movie making in the history of cinema. America’s answer to European Art Cinema, one of the best to come out in recent years. Set within the 12 years the movie was made in, we literally see, the lead actor, Ellar Coltrane (playing Mason) grow up in front of our eyes, from ages 6 to 18; as does Lorelei Grace Linklater (real life daughter of the film director, who plays Samantha, Mason’s older sister). And the best part is their parents, played by Ethan Hawke and Patricia Arquette, naturally mature within those 12 years, sans make-up, or computer graphics, to make them look older.

The premise of the film is extremely simple. The movie is a coming of age story, coinciding with the child’s own real-life coming of age, and the battle adults face, as two separated parents, bringing up their two children, to the best of their ability, as well as possible, in the 21 century United States, from 2002 till date. Though separated, both are very good parents to their children. The movie could easily be translated as ‘Parenthood’, just as much as it is ‘Boyhood’. Majority of the film  is literally filmed per year, showing us the children in each age, but in some places it skips a year.

Richard Linklater’s 12 year risk, shot in real-time, has paid off, by taking up such a simplistic storyline, and turning it into a marvellously stylistic and artistic piece of cinematic experience. One of the Best films 0f Year 2014.

Love the cast, Love the movie, Love everything about it. Such an authentic piece of realistic cinema. Pure Artistry! 10/10 for Excellence!!!!!
                                      Ö Ö Ö Ö Ö °°°°°*****Ö Ö Ö Ö Ö

Magic in the Moonlight (2014)
Watched the Woody Allen comedy, Magic in the Moonlight (2014) on the Qantas Airways flight from Sydney to Singapore, on the 14th of November 2014. (See my posts Holidaying in South Australia & Holidaying in Australia, comes to an end)

Set in the roaring 20’s, on the French Riviera, this comedy is about a fraudulent magician, a snobbish Englishman (Colin Firth), who tries to unmask yet another deceitful spiritualist (Emma Stone), in turn falling for her and her gag. It’s an enjoyable enough old school comedy, yet it starts to be too predictable and falter towards the end. Definitely not Woody Allen’s finest directorial venture, and no where near his unmatchable Art House, romantic comedies, from back in day, like Annie Hall (1977) and Manhattan (1979). But he’s still definitely got the knack for farcical story telling, yet Magic in the Moonlight is not one of them.

OK fare. 6/10 !!!       
                                             Ö Ö Ö °°°***Ö Ö Ö

The Two Faces of January (2014)
Watched The Two Faces of January (2014), on the 15th of November 2014, early morning/past 14th midnight, on the next flight, Emirates Airlines, from Singapore to Colombo. (See my post Holidaying in Australia, comes to an end)

Being a fan of Patricia Highsmith crime thrillers, I was really looking forward to watching this latest Hollywood cinematic adaptation by, Iranian born British director, Hossein Amini. My favourite Highsmith book happens to be The Talented Mr. Ripley, and I enjoyed reading Strangers on a Train as well. Added to that, I also love their film adaptations. Hitchcock’s excellent adaptation that was Strangers on a Train (1951). René Clément’s French thriller, Plein Soleil (1959/60), with Alain Delon as Mr. Ripley, based on Highsmith’s The Talented Mr. Ripley. Anthony Minghella’s The Talented Mr. Ripley (1999) starring Jude Law and Gwyneth Paltrow, with Matt Damon playing Mr. Ripley. And of course, though not as excellent as the previous three, the very good adaptation that was, Ripley’s Game (2002), starring an exceptional John Malkovich as Mr. Ripley.

The Two Faces of January starts off well, and is pretty well made, transporting us back to the early 1960’s Athens. The suspenseful thriller is almost Hitchcockian till the main crime takes place. Post that, it starts to waver somewhat. Being based on a Highsmith crime, the storyline is really good, but the film seems in a rush to tie up any loose ends and finish the movie as soon as possible. It doesn’t let the story develop, nor the characters. If the movie wasn’t made just in 96 minutes, and took it’s time a bit more to tell the story, Highsmith’s work could have been done justice to. There are some flicks which are unnecessarily too long, and waste a lot time on unnecessary stuff, while here it’s the exact opposite. It’s tries too quickly to bind things together, killing of the cinematic experience, into a tight, and very hurried up, 96 minutes. This is Hossein Amini second film, and first feature length work, as a director.

Good Try, by the director, with an OK/watchable outcome. 6/10 !!!                  
                                             Ö Ö Ö °°°***Ö Ö Ö  

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense
Nuwan Sen n’ Travel/Film

Judging the film by the titles.
Doesn’t matter whether I love these movies or not, I love these interesting film titles. They sound pretty cool.
Film Titles
I took part in a poll on IMDB, about favourite film titles. In two parts, it asked us to select our favourite film title, pre-1975 & post-1975. For pre-1975, I chose A Clockwork Orange (1971) as my favourite title, and for post-1975, I chose Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004) as my favourite title. For overall favourite title I chose A Clockwork Orange, of course. See their polls as well Run-Off: The Best Film Title EverRun-Off: The Best Film Titles Part I & Run Off Poll: The Best Film Titles Part II.

Have your ever loved the title of a movie, but not necessarily the film? Let me know your favourite film title, from a literary sense. I love most of the 100 movies listed below, some more than others. But the list is mainly to do with my favourite film titles, some are based on novels, plays etc etc.. that I happen to love too. There might be many a films I’ve missed out, as I’ve narrowed this down to just 100 films out of the zillion that exist. Feel free to add, and let me know your favourite title of a film, not your favourite film, unless of course they are one and the same.

A Clockwork Orange (1971)

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958)

To Kill a Mockingbird (1962)

Fiddler on the Roof (1971)

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004)

Anne of the Thousand Days (1969)

A Room with a View (1985)

Thank you for Smoking (2005)

Woman in the Dunes (1964)

Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf ? (1966)

Chariots of Fire (1981)

Catch Me If You Can (2002)

Confessions of a Dangerous Mind (2002)

The Last Emperor (1987)

Gone With The Wind (1939)

Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961)

Breakfast on Pluto (2005)

Y Tu Mamá También (2001)

The Lady Vanishes (1938 & 1979)

36, Chowringhee Lane (1981)

Last Tango in Paris (1972)

La Mala Educación (2004)

Through a Glass Darkly (1961)

The Triplets of Belleville (2003)

The Great Gatsby (2013)

The Sheltering Sky (1990)

I Heart Huckabees (2004)

1947 Earth (1998)

3:10 to Yuma (2007)

Carnage (2011)

Heat and Dust (1983)

Dr. Strangelove: or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)

The Year of Living Dangerously (1982)

Caesar and Cleopatra (1945)

Rebecca (1940)

Casablanca (1942)

Anna Karenina (1935 & 2012)

Cleopatra (1963)

Malèna (2000)

The Knife in the Water (1962)

Double Indemnity (1944)

Zwartboek (2006)

The Namesake (2006)

Good Will Hunting (1997)

Jules et Jim (1962)

Muqaddar Ka Sikandar (1978)

The Cider House Rules (1999)

Balzac and the Little Chinese Seamstress (2002)

Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977)

The Silence of the Lambs (1991)

Interview with the Vampire (1994)

No Country for Old Men (2007)

A Passage to India (1984)

The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934 & 1956)

The Man Who Fell to Earth (1976)

The Americanization of Emily (1964)

Lawrence of Arabia (1962)

Shakespeare Wallah (1965)

Saving Private Ryan (1998)

West Side Story (1961)

Silver Linings Playbook (2012)

The Pelican Brief (1993)

Roman Holiday (1953)

City Lights (1931)

A Few Good Men (1992)

12 Angry Men (1957 & 1997)

Salaam Bombay! (1988)

Silkwood (1983)

Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994)

The 39 Steps (1935)

The Thirty-Nine Steps (1978)

Charlie Wilson’s War (2007)

Singin’ in the Rain (1952)

Life of Pi (2012)

The Iron Lady (2011)

To Sir, with Love (1967)

My Fair Lady (1964)

Sleeping with the Enemy (1991)

Metropolis (1927)

Paris, Texas (1984)

Erin Brockovich (2000)

Chinatown (1974)

Hideous Kinky (1998)

Rosemary’s Baby (1968)

The Wizard of Oz (1939)

Brief Encounter (1945)

Tess (1979)

Modern Times (1936)

WALL-E (2008)

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953)

Trainspotting (1996)

The Rainmaker (1997)

Easy Rider (1969)

The Sound of Music (1965)

Doctor Zhivago (1965)

Latter Days (2003)

The Sheik (1921)

Notting Hill (1999)

Dans Paris (2006)

Wilde (1997)

This is not in order of my favourite films; as I like Breakfast at Tiffany’s more than A Clockwork Orange, and Gone With The Wind more than both of them put together, and Roman Holiday, which happens to be my all time favourite movie is no.63 in the list; but in order of my favourite titles, of unique names, that tend to have a nice ring to them. Would like to hear about your favourites.

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense
Nuwan Sen’s Film Title Sense

Bollywood’s eternal beauty, diva and award winning film actress, Rekha, turns 60 today. Born in Madras (now Chennai), in the south Indian state of Tamil Nadu; to famed Tamil film actor, Gemini Ganesan, from his love affair with, Telugu film actress (from Andhra Pradesh), Pushpavalli; Rekha made it big up north in Bollywood (Hindi Film Industry), back in the 1970’s, and never looked down again.
Rekha 60Rekha is one of the rare Bollywood actresses to make it big in both fields, of the Commercial (mainstream) Hindi Cinema as well as Art House Films (Parallel Cinema). She started her career as a child actress in 1966 in a film in her mother’s mother-tongue, Telugu, in the state of Andhra Pradesh. Telugu film industry of Hyderabad, is also nicknamed Tollywood. Then she appeared in a Kannada film, from the Bangalore Film Industry, in the state of Karnataka. After having appeared in these South Indian languages, soon she got a chance to act in her first Hindi Film (the national language of India), up in Bollywood, located in Bombay (now known as Mumbai), in the State of Maharashtra. Bollywood is the most internationally acknowledged Indian Commercial/mainstream Film Industry, that too made in the national language. Bollywood to India is what Hollywood is to the world, one of the greatest famed commercial outputs in the cinematic planet. Once a person makes his/her mark in Bollywood, they rarely bother acting in any other regional, comparatively smaller scale, industries that exist around the country, in various other languages, such as Marathi, Punjabi, Guajarati, Assamese, Malayalam, Tamil, Telugu etc etc etc… Of course when it comes to Art Cinema, Bengali Art films; from Calcutta, in the state of Bengal; happen to be the most well recognised internationally, much like European and Japanese Art Cinema, and American Independent Films. Hindi Art Cinema and most Indian English language movies, too happen to be of a very high standard.
Rekha turns 60I have been watching Bollywood movies, ever since I can remember. Here is a list of some famous movies Rekha has appeared in, along with some of her greatest roles ever, to the best of my memory (in order of year released).

Gora aur Kala (1972) – I watched it as a kid in the 1980’s, and my memory is extremely vague on this one. But the film is about India’s own racism against dark skin, that exists even today, quite openly, promoting bleach skin creams. The movie, with a historical setting, is about a pair of twins, one fair, one dark. The partially paralysed disowned dark child, turns into a dacoit when he grows up. (Unrated) Hindi Commercial Film. 

Namak Haraam (1973) – Another movie I watched as a child, but luckily got to re-watch it about a decade or so ago. A very socialist film, dealing with social injustice towards poor workers in a factory. A very plump, teenage Rekha, has an insignificant role in this, yet her acting is pretty good, and the film is really good, with a great social message. Watch out for actress Simi Garewal’s minute but effective role of a kind hearted, sophisticated, social activist. Also see Amitabh Bachchan play the ever suffering hot tempered hero. Very Good – 8/10. Hindi Commercial Film.

Nagin (1976) – Yet another movie I watched as a child, but I remember it pretty well, as I watched it in the latter part of the 80’s. This fantasy film dealt with a female snakes revenge on the men who killed her male partner. She takes on the avatar of the men’s love interests and kills them off one by one. Rekha has a minute but very relevant role as Sunil Dutt’s love interest. When the snake takes the human form as Rekha, the seduction scene is scary as much as it is a brilliant performance by Rekha. Hell hath no fury than a woman scorned. Watch out for those big kohl filled seductive vengeful eyes, in a black slinky number. OK Movie – 6/10. Hindi Commercial Film.        

Aap Ki Khatir (1977) – Watched this somewhere in the 90’s. Hilarious comedy about a foolish middle-class wife, played by Rekha, who borrows money from a moneylender to invest in the stock market, unknown to her husband, Vinod Khanna. Soon the stock market crashes, and so does her ordinary stress free lifestyle. Pretty Good – 7/10. Hindi Commercial Film.

Alaap (1977) – Another socialist venture, where a son, played by Amitabh Bachchan, disowns his unfair rich father, Om Prakash, and resides among slum dwellers, to help them. Rekha plays his love interest. Luckily I re-watched this as a young adult, a decade or so ago. Pretty Good – 7/10. Hindi Commercial Film.  

Muqaddar Ka Sikandar (1978) – The last time I watched this was as a teenager back in 1994, 20 years ago. A very tragic movie about many a suffering souls and tragic misunderstandings. Almost Shakespearean. The bewitchingly beautiful Rekha gives an equally beautiful performance of a modern day suffering courtesan who sacrifices for her unrequited love, Amitabh Bachchan. Near Excellence – 9/10. Hindi Commercial Film.   

Suhaag (1979) – Watched it some years ago. An OK movie, watchable thanks to the great cast including Amitabh Bachchan, Shashi Kapoor, Rekha and Parveen Babi. OK Movie – 5/10. Hindi Commercial Film.

Kali Ghata (1980) – Watched this thriller as a child, thus my memory is pretty vague. Rekha does a double role playing twins. One sister travels abroad, another gets engaged to her lover, Shashi Kapoor. As they are having a romantic evening, in a house boat, during a stormy night, Rekha is pushed off from the boat. Suspecting her seemingly innocent fiancé had something to do with it, she fakes her own death, and comes back in the guise of her sister, to find out the truth. (Unrated) Hindi Commercial Film.

Khubsoorat (1980) – Watched it as child, then again earlier this year. Rekha plays a young beauty who brings laughter and merriment to her sister’s in-laws strict household ruled by her sister’s mother-in-law, the authority figure. Rekha won her first ‘Best Actress’ Filmfare trophy for Khubsoorat. Excellent Comedy!!!! 10/10. Hindi Commercial Film.

Saajan Ki Saheli (1981) – Another movie I watched as a child, thus hardly remember it. Rekha plays an illegitimate daughter of a classy sophisticated lady, Nutan, who’s unaware that her daughter from a previous one night stand, before she married, is still alive. (Unrated) Hindi Commercial Film.

Kalyug (1981) – An excellent art movie by Shyam Benegal, watched few years ago. A modern day Mahabharata dealing with two business families. Excellent. 10/10. Hindi Art Movie.

Silsila (1981) – Watched this over a decade ago. Reel life aping real life. Rekha was having an adulterous affair with the very married Amitabh Bachchan in the late 70’s and early 80’s. This movie deals with two married people who have a secret love affair. Very Good – 8/10. Hindi Commercial Film.

Baseraa (1981) – Rekha plays a widow who ends up marrying her mentally insane sisters husband Shashi Kapoor, to disastrous results, when the sister, Rakhee, comes back home from asylum, some fifteen years later. Re-watched this some years ago. Very Good – 8/10. Hindi Commercial Film.

Umrao Jaan (1981) – An aesthetic commercial epic, based on a true story, about a 19th Century courtesan. Watched this some years ago, but the DVD got stuck in the middle. Thus I’ven’t watched the whole movie. But the half that I got to watch showcased a masterpiece of excellence. Rekha bagged the ‘Best Actress’ National Award for her role of Umrao Jaan. (Unrated) Hindi Commercial Film.

Vijeta (1982) – Watched as a little child. A story dealing with a son of a Sikh. I don’t remember this Art House movie that well. (Unrated) Hindi Art Movie.

Zameen Aasmaan (1984) – Watched as a teenager. A movie dealing with a woman (Rakhee), who brings up her late husband’s (Shashi Kapoor) child, from his one night stand with a nurse (Rekha). OK Movie – 5/10. Hindi Commercial Film.

Utsav (1984) – Watched about a decade or so ago. This very adult comical art house movie, produced by Shashi Kapoor, deals with a courtesan, in the 5th Century B.C., Vasantsena (Rekha), on the run, while a man, Vatsyayan (Amjad Khan), does his research for the Kama Sutra (Vatsyayan is the author of The Kama Sutra). It’s a hilarious parable. Excellent!!! 10/10. Hindi Art Movie.  

Faasle (1985) – Watched as a child and later again. Rekha plays the secret lover of a widower, who doesn’t wish to marry her for the sake of his children. OK Venture – 5/10. Hindi Commercial Film.

Jhoothi (1985) – Watched as a kid, but remember loving it back then. A story of a good hearted compulsive liar, played by Rekha. I would like to re-watch it sometime. Near Excellence – 9/10. Hindi Commercial Film.   

Locket (1986) – Vague memory of watching this as a child. (Unrated) Hindi Commercial Film.

Insaaf Ki Awaaz (1986) – Again watched as a child, about a female cop, who juggles her duty to work with her duty to family, as a daughter-in-law, a wife/later widow and a mother of a teenage daughter. OK Film – 6/10. Hindi Commercial Film.  

Biwi Ho To Aisi (1988) – Watched in the late 80’s, a comedy about a daughter-in-law who drives her narrow minded cruel mother-in-law insane, by not folding to her pressure. Very Good – 8/10. Hindi Commercial Film.

Khoon Bhari Maang (1988) – Watched in the early 90’s. A film about a mother of two who becomes a fashion model and plots revenge on her husband who tried to murder her. Very Good – 8/10. Hindi Commercial Film.

Kama Sutra: A Tale of Love (1996) – Watched this Adult movie, back in the late 90’s, on the big screen, and some years ago as well. Mira Nair’s controversial take on the famed ‘Art of Lovemaking’, The Kama Sutra. Set in 16th century India, Rekha played the teacher of the Kama Sutra. Very Good – 8/10. English Art House Movie.

Aastha: In the Prison of Spring (1997) – Watched in 97’ itself, on the Big Screen. Yet another erotic movie for mature audiences, about an ordinary housewife and mother, who is entrapped into prostitution and performing in weird sexual styles, which she later teaches her surprised husband. Pretty Good – 7/10. Hindi Art House Movie.

Zubeidaa (2001) – An excellent commercial venture from Art film director, Shyam Benegal. A real life bio-pic of a tragic Princess, based on a book written by her son, Khalid Mohamed. Rekha plays Zubeidaa’s (Karishma Kapoor) husband’s (Manoj Bajpayee) first wife, Mandira Devi. Watched at the turn of this century. Excellent !!!! 10/10. Hindi Commercial Film.
 
Mujhe Meri Biwi Se Bachaao (2001) – Watched about a decade ago. A silly comedy, watchable thanks to the cast, including Naseeruddin Shah and Rekha. OK Venture – 5/10. Hindi Commercial Film.

Lajja (2001) – A feminist film about the ill treatment of women in India. Watched at the beginning of this century. Near Excellence – 9/10. Hindi Commercial Film.      

Dil Hai Tumhaara (2002) – Enjoyable enough melodrama. Typical modern day Hindi movie. Watched a decade or so ago. Pretty Good – 7/10. Hindi Commercial Film.      

Koi… Mil Gaya (2003) – Watched a decade ago. A Bollywood take on Steven Spielberg’s E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982). Watch out for Hrithik Roshan’s  superb performance as Rekha’s brain damaged, child-like, adult son. He carries the entire film on his shoulders. OK Movie – 6/10. Hindi Commercial Film.        

Parineeta (2005) – Watched in 2006, on the Big Screen. Rekha only has a cameo in this excellent movie based on a Bengali novel by Sarat Chandra Chattopadhyay. She sings with her own voice and performs an elegant cabaret number in a red hot saree. It’s worth it. Excellent !!!! 10/10. Hindi Commercial Film.

Krrish (2006) – Watched in 2006. Bollywood’s take on a super hero sequel to Koi… Mil Gaya. What Crap was that??? 2/10. Hindi Commercial Film.

Rekha in her latest movie SUPER NANI (2014)

Rekha in her latest movie SUPER NANI (2014)

Super Nani (2014) – Haven’t watched it yet. In her latest comedy, she plays a neglected ‘Nani’ (Maternal Grandmother), who takes up modelling in her old age, with the help of her grandson. I plan to check it out just because Rekha is in it. (Unrated) Hindi Commercial Film. 

Besides acting, Rekha has dubbed, with her trademark throaty voice, for a few other heroines, in a few Hindi movies.

Wishing Madame Ré all the best for her 60th Birthday.

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense.

Welcome to The Essential 60’s Blogathon.

Inspired by many a Blogathon’s hosted by various bloggers in recent times, I decided to start one of my own. So let’s celebrate the next 21 days of September 2014, with the Swinging Sizzling Sixties.
60's Main Pic for BlogathonThe Essential 60’s

The 1960’s, an era well before my time, was one of the most fashionable, elegant, eras of the 20th century, when the world changed for the better, with youth rebellions, feminism, the hippies, black pride movements and gay pride movements. It’s thanks to the 60’s we live a freer life today, or rather we should, in a more open minded society. So here’s to the 1960’s decade, with massive hairdo’s (the bouffant), tight pants and micro-mini skirts.

So fellow bloggers, please do take part in The Essential 60’s Blogathon, by choosing a film, or two, or more, released anywhere between 1961 and 2014, that is set in the 1960’s, and writing a small (or big) critique about it (Please let me know before hand the movie you’ve chosen), on your own blog (please pass on the link as a comment here, once you finish the post). Since the setting should be the 60’s, it doesn’t have to be a movie released in the 60’s only. And even among the movies released in the 60’s, if the setting isn’t the 60’s, those movies aren’t part of this Blogathon. Thus any movie, that is set in the 60’s, be it released in the 60’s, or post, are welcome. Added to that, please choose one of the Polaroid style photographs below (made by me), out of the six provided, and add it at the end of your post.

Kindly blog about the films you choose for this Blogathon, by the 30th of September, this year.

Thanking you
Nuwan Sen (Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense)
Of ‘No Nonsense with Nuwan Sen’

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Pictures inspired by Polaroid’s

60’s a.     Scene from Blow-Up (1966)
60's a60’s b.     Peter Fonda in Easy Rider (1969)
60's b60’s c.     Sixties Styles with Audrey Hepburn I
60's c60’s d.     Sixties Styles with Audrey Hepburn II
60's d60’s e.     Bollywood and the styles of the 60’s
60's e60’s f.     Carey Mulligan and Peter Sarsgaard in Paris, in a scene from
An Education (2009), a movie set in the 60’s.

60's f

List of Bloggers taking part and the films they’ll critique.

Nuwan Sen – Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964)

Cindy Bruchman The Hustler (1961)

Roger Poladopoulos (A Guy without Boxers)The Boys In The Band (1970)

Halim – Down with Love (2003)

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense
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One of my favourite film directors, Richard Samuel Attenborough, died on Sunday 24th of August, 2014, less than a week away from his 91st Birthday. He was the older brother of Sir David Attenborough, a naturalist and broadcaster, and John Attenborough. John Attenborough died in November 2012.
Richard AttenboroughBaron Attenborough was born in the beautiful city of Cambridge, in the county town of Cambridgeshire, England, United Kingdom; on the 29th of August, 1923. Born into an intellectual and heroic family; his mother was a founding member of the Marriage Guidance Council, and his father a scholar and academic administrator who was a fellow at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and wrote a standard text on Anglo-Saxon law; Richard Attenborough’s parents saved two Jewish girls during the Second World War and later adopted them once they discovered the girls’ parent’s were killed off. Richard Attenborough served in the Royal Air Force (RAF), during the Second World War. Soon he joined the RAF Film Unit at Pinewood Studios, where in 1943, he worked with Edward G. Robinson in the propaganda film, Journey Together (1945). The Acting bug hit him, whilst still serving in the Air Force (where he sustained permanent ear damage), and the rest is history.

I fell in love with the biographical epic tear-jerker Gandhi (1982), when I watched it as a child in the early-mid 1980’s. And as we had the video tape of Gandhi, at home, I have watched it a zillion times since then. Plus, when I was studying for my M.A. in International Cinema (2002-2003); at the University of Luton, Luton, UK; I got a chance to study this, three hour long, great epic, scene by scene. It was for my mini-dissertation, titled Historical, Heritage and Hackneyed Cinema: British and Hollywood Cinema set in early twentieth Century India, of 10,330 words, in my second semester. Gandhi was a movie that fell under ‘Historical Cinema’, where I did an analysis of racial tension (under the chapter White Bred over Brown Bred: Colonial Relations), the significance of land, specifically the ‘Train’ in Gandhi (under the chapter Landscape and it’s significance), and a character psychoanalysis (under the chapter Gender & Sexuality). Gender & Sexuality was the most crucial chapter in my mini-dissertation, which paved the way, to do a complete psychoanalysis on gender, for my final dissertation (on Hitchcockian Cinema) of 25,000 to 30,000 words, in my final semester.

Richard Attenborough and actor Ben Kingsley at the Oscars, in 1983. With their wins for Best Picture, Best Director & Best Actor, for GANDHI (1982).

Richard Attenborough and actor Ben Kingsley at the Oscars, in 1983.
With their wins for Best Picture, Best Director & Best Actor, for GANDHI (1982).

Attenborough’s directorial epic, Gandhi, is no doubt the best film to come out of the 1980’s (see my post My Favourite movie by decade, My Favourite Oscar Winner per decade from March 2014). The movie was based on the non-violent struggle of Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, India’s peace activist and modern day saint, who, during the British Raj, drove away the British colonist, by hurting their conscience, instead of acting against them through violence. Of course the movie depicts him as a perfectionist, but he was a human being, and no human being is perfect. He had his little flaws, yet he was a truly great human being. Gandhi deservedly won eight Oscars (out the eleven nominated for) in 1983, including for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Original Screenplay and Best Cinematography, among others. Gandhi won over 40 other awards in various other award functions (in various categories), including at the BAFTA’s and the Golden Globes.

Richard Attenborough’s acting career began on stage, where he met his future wife, stage actress Sheila Sim, with whom he appeared on the West End production of Agatha Christie’s The Mousetrap. This production led to the two falling in love and they were married in 1945. And they were happily married until Attenborough’s death on Sunday. Sheila Sim is currently suffering from senile dementia, which she was diagnosed with back in June 2012, just after her 90th Birthday. Richard Attenborough, who also attended the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, remained a Patron until his death.

Richard Attenborough with Laura Dern and Sam Neill in a scene from JURASSIC PARK (1993)

Richard Attenborough with Laura Dern and Sam Neill in a scene from JURASSIC PARK (1993)

As a teenager, in New Delhi, in 1994, I watched Steven Spielberg’s Jurassic Park (1993), on video tape, and later on the Big Screen, within that year. I thought it was a really good Sci-fi, B-movie. And I loved the way Attenborough’s character, Prof. John Hammond, explains the process of extracting blood (Dinosaur DNA) from a mosquito that had been preserved in amber fossil. At that age, DNA extraction and cloning really impressed me, something I learned as a kid in school in the late 80’s. The rest of the film was a visually spectacular drama, loved the CGI of the time, especially the creations of pre-historic animals, but what I found the most amazing was Prof. Hammond’s detailed explanation. I wasn’t so crazy about the sequels, The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997) and Jurassic Park III (2001), though. Yet I wouldn’t mind checking out the latest instalment, Jurassic World, which is yet to be released.
Richard Attenborough z Brighton Rock  (1947)Richard Attenborough starred in a lot of great movies throughout the 40’s, 50’s and 60’s, including In Which we Serve (1942), Brighton Rock (1947), The Man Within (1947), The Guinea Pig (1948), Boys in Brown (1949), Eight O’Clock Walk (1954), SOS Pacific (1959), The Angry Silence (1960), The Dock Brief (1962), The Great Escape (1963), The Flight of the Phoenix (1965), Doctor Dolittle (1967) and The Magic Christian (1969) with Ringo Starr of ‘The Beatles’, to name a few out of zillion he’s starred in. Brighton Rock, The Great Escape, The Flight of the Phoenix, Doctor Dolittle, 10 Rillington Place (1971), Jurassic Park and Miracle on 34th Street (1994), are amongst his most popular films as an actor. I have a vague memory of watching The Great Escape as a little kid, but am unsure. Anyway, I re-watched it more recently and loved it too. This excellent flick, based on a true story, is about several escape attempts by allied prisoners of war from a German POW camp, during World War – II.

In the late 60’s, Richard Attenborough, made his directorial debut, with the musical, Oh! What a Lovely War (1969). His next directorial venture was Young Winston (1972).
Richard Attenborough Young WinstonIn England, in 2002-2003, I watched Attenborough’s previous biographical epic, Young Winston (1972), at the University Library. This movie deals with former British Prime Minister, Winston Churchill’s, younger days, stationed in India and Sudan, as a cavalry officer. I really enjoyed it. Though no where near as great as Attenborough’s magnum opus, that was Gandhi, Young Winston was still a pretty good movie.

Besides Young Winston and Gandhi, as a director, Richard Attenborough, brought out some amazing biographical epics, like A Bridge Too Far (1977); about an unsuccessful Allied military operation, fought in the Netherlands and Germany during World War – II; Cry Freedom (1987); based on the life and death of prominent anti-apartheid activist Steve Biko; Chaplin (1992); on film genius, Sir Charles Chaplin, a.k.a. Charlie Chaplin; Shadowlands (1993); on the heart-rending love story between Oxford academic C. S. Lewis and American poet Joy Davidman, and her tragic death from cancer; In Love and War (1996) on Ernest Hemingway’s experiences during the First World War; and Grey Owl (1999), another bio-pic, this time about Archibald Belaney, a.k.a. Grey Owl, who was a British schoolboy who turned into an Indian trapper, and called himself ‘Grey Owl’.

Richard Attenborough didn’t just make bio-pics, he made a few out and out fictional movies as well, and his last film was Closing the Ring (2007).

Richard Attenborough zfilms Down Under, in Sydney, in 2008, I watched Closing the Ring (2007), on the Big Screen, Attenborough’s last venture. Pretty Good but far from great. Starring Shirley MacLaine, Christopher Plummer, Mischa Barton, Stephen Amell, Neve Campbell, Pete Postlethwaite and Brenda Fricker. The biggest mistake Attenborough did, was to take in the muscular pretty boy, Stephen Amell, who can’t act for peanuts. He just voiced the dialogues expressionlessly, like a pretty mannequin, a Barbie doll. The story was interesting enough though, set during the Second World War (in flashbacks) and the 1990’s; set in Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK and Michigan, USA. Towards the end, it becomes a bit cheesy and overtly melodramatic. But still an enjoyable enough watch, thanks to the veteran actors in it.

A sad loss, with the death of a British gem, Richard Attenborough. Day after tomorrow, 29th August, 2014, would be his 91st Birth anniversary. He’ll be remembered forever through his great works. May he rest in peace.

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense

I discovered Sidney Lumet films, pretty late in the day, for a film buff, though I was aware of some of his more famous work, since my teenage years. Some of the first films of his I watched were about a decade ago, The Appointment (1969), Serpico (1973), Murder on the Orient express (1974) and Dog Day Afternoon (1975). And the most recent movie of his I watched was, his feature length directorial debut, 12 Angry Men (1957).
Sidney LumetBeginnings
Sidney Lumet was born in Philadelphia, USA, on the 25th of June, 1924, to two veterans of the ‘Yiddish Theatre’. Thus, dramatic arts being in their bloodline, Lumet was lucky enough to be born into such a family. Lumet’s father was a Polish Jewish emigrant to the United States. Lumet’s mother died when he was still a child.

Sidney Lumet made his debut on Radio at the age of four, and by five he was already working on stage, as part of the ‘Yiddish Theatre’ group. Soon he was working on Broadway plays, and by eleven he starred in his first film, a short film called Papirossen (1935). At fifteen, he appeared on the feature film, One Third of a Nation (1939). But soon his acting career came to a standstill with the Second World War and him coming of age, and he was stationed in India and Burma as a radar repairmen between 1942 and 1946. On his return to the States, he formed an Off-Broadway theatre group, and became it’s director. Soon he evolved into being a highly respectable Television director. But it was only in his 30’s that he got to finally direct his very first feature film, 12 Angry Men (1957).
Sidney Lumet's 12 Angry MenSidney Lumet & Social Realism
I watched 12 Angry Men (1957), Lumet’s first big screen directorial venture, just late last month, when it was shown; projected on to a not so big – big screen; at the Ethnic Centre here. 12 Angry Men is about 12 angry jurors, headed by Henry Fonda.

A young Hispanic man is on trial for the murder of his intolerable father. As the juror’s are locked up in the room, to discuss the case, we find 11 of the juror’s having already made up their mind that the kid is guilty, except for one, Henry Fonda. It’s interesting to watch how effectively Fonda’s character creates doubt in each juror’s mind, and turns them one by one to agreeing with him on a ‘Not Guilty’ verdict, in this highly intellectualised film. A very intriguing character study of 12 varied unnamed men (simply known as Juror. #1, Juror. #2, Juror. #3 et al), stuck inside a room on a very hot day, with their temperatures rising to near boiling point. The film was nominated for three Oscars, including for ‘Best Picture’ and ‘Best Director’.

Beautifully directed, it’s a bridge between art cinema and a commercial venture, which veers more towards art cinema. Yet, Lumet never liked to make his films too artsy, but at the same time wasn’t interested in making an overtly decorated, visually appealing, meaningless film either. He liked a social message input, he loved realism, yet the kind that people would enjoy watching. Lumet abided by a good script, great dialogues and superb performances from his actors, testing them to the limits, rather than action.

I had seen the latter remake (1997 version) of this movie starring Jack Lemmon, George C. Scott, Edward James Olmos and Tony Danza, about a decade or so ago. Which too was a very good television adaptation. But the Lumet classic was a magnificent piece of social realism. In fact Sidney Lumet is known for films on Social Realism. Take Network (1976) for instance.

Faye Dunaway, on the phone, in a scene from, NETWORK

Faye Dunaway, on the phone, in a scene from, NETWORK (1976)

I watched Network, down under, in Sydney, back in 2008, when it was shown at the ‘Art Gallery of New South Wales’. We (my friends and I) use to  go and watch some great classic, and foreign language, movies at this Art Gallery in Sydney, while I resided there (2006-2008). Network is a fascinating tale of media manipulation (electronic media in this case) to get what they want. They’d do anything possible, to the extent of being inhumane to gain higher ratings for their show. The movie, staring Faye Dunaway, William Holden, Robert Duvall and Peter Finch, shows how an ageing anchor, when fired, reacts in a strange way, and ends up being a martyr of sorts exploited by the television industry. The movie was nominated for 10 Oscars, and took home 4 trophies. Peter Finch was the first actor to win the ‘Best Actor’ award posthumously at the Academy Awards.

Network is a brilliant insight into media lifestyle, and my favourite Lumet film till date. Network was the second last Sidney Lumet film I watched until I saw 12 Angry Men, end of last month.

In 2007, while studying in Sydney, Australia, I watched Equus (1977), at my University (UNSW) library. Another superb character analysis here, with Richard Burton playing a psychiatrist trying to make sense of teenage boy’s unhealthy attraction towards horses. The boy, played by Peter Firth, finds sexual satisfaction through grooming horses and riding them in the nude. Yet one day in rage he blinds six horses in a stable. In early 2007, the play, by Peter Shaffer, which this movie is based on, was in the talks, as Daniel Radcliffe was performing the role of the teenage boy obsessed with horses, for a stage version, on the other side of the ocean. Soon I knew I had to check this film out, and it was truly worth it.

Richard Burton does a superb job as the psychiatrist, who ends up envying the young man, for the youngster finds more pleasure through horses, than the shrink has ever done in his life. Equus was nominated for 3 Oscars.
Sidney Lumet's Murder on the Orient ExpressLumet’s take on Agatha Christie
One of the first Lumet movies I watched was, Murder on the Orient Express (1974), just over a decade ago, whilst living in Oslo, Norway. Based on an Agatha Christie novel, this was a brilliant adaptation with a great star cast of legendary actors including Lauren Bacall, Ingrid Bergman and Albert Finney to name a few. The whole movie set in a train, Pre-World War-II, where one of the passengers included, the famed fictional Belgian detective, Hercule Poirot (Albert Finney). A business tycoon (Richard Widmark), has been killed, stabbed 12 times, and everyone has a motive. The suspects include a great glamorous star cast, with the who’s who of cinema. Lauren Bacall, Ingrid Bergman, Vanessa Redgrave, John Gielgud, Michael York, Sean Connery, Anthony Perkins and Jacqueline Bisset. Ingrid Bergman won the ‘Best Supporting Actress’ Oscar, the movie altogether was nominated for six awards.

Around the same time I also watched Lumet’s The Appointment (1969). Just don’t recall whether I watched in Norway or in England, UK. The Appointment, starring Omar Sharif and French actress Anouk Aimée, was a moderately good movie, set in Rome, about a husband who suspects his innocent wife of being a high-class prostitute, with tragic consequences.
The Appointment was nominated for the ‘Palme d’Or’ at the Cannes Film Festival in 1969.

Al Pacino Sidney Lumet films

Lumet works with Al Pacino
Around the same time, 10 years ago, in 2004, I watched Serpico (1973) and Dog Day Afternoon (1975), on the small screen, while living in Portsmouth, England, UK. Both starring Al Pacino, and both based on a true story. Serpico is a brilliant film, where Pacino plays a real life heroic cop, NYPD officer Frank Serpico, who went undercover to expose corruption in the police force. Dog Day Afternoon is a fictionalised story about an actual Brooklyn Bank robbery that took place in 1972, during the hot ‘sultry dog days of summer’. Both films were nominated in various categories at the Academy Awards, and Serpico took home no Oscars, including the ‘Best Actor’ trophy for Al Pacino, while Dog Day Afternoon bagged one but both Pacino and Lumet lost out on their consecutive awards yet again.

Christopher Reeve in DEATHTRAP (1982)

Christopher Reeve in DEATHTRAP (1982)

Lumet works with his daughter, Jenny
Sidney Lumet cast his writer daughter in three movies, including Deathtrap (1982), Running on Empty (1988) and Q & A (1990). Am yet to watch any of these movies.

Lumet’s last work
I watched Lumet’s last film, Before the Devil knows You’re Dead (2007), early on in 2008, on the big screen, in Sydney, Australia. By now Philip Seymour Hoffman, even more popular, post his Oscar win for Capote (2005), played the lead in this tragic cinematic piece of excellence.

Ethan Hawke and Marisa Tomei in a scene from BEFORE THE DEVIL KNOWS YOU'RE DEAD (2007)

Ethan Hawke and Marisa Tomei in a scene from BEFORE THE DEVIL KNOWS YOU’RE DEAD (2007)

Most probably the most out and out commercial venture made by Sidney Lumet. And not necessarily as great as many of his classics, but still an excellently well made movie. Before the Devil knows You’re Dead, is about two brothers who decide to rob their own parents jewellery store, yet hoping to make it a victimless crime. But there is no such thing as a perfect crime, thus things go haywire and their mother, who gets shot, falls into a coma. The movie has a great cast, besides Seymour Hoffman, it also stars Ethan Hawke, Albert Finney, Marisa Tomei, and Rosemary Harris. Unfortunately, a talented actress like Marisa Tomei, is wasted in this movie. She’s used as nothing but a sex object, sharing a bed between two brothers. Married to one, and having affair with other.

Lumet classics am yet to watch
Besides Deathtrap (1982), Running on Empty (1988) and Q & A (1990),  there are so many of his films am yet to watch including, Stage Struck (1958), That Kind of Woman (1959), The Fugitive Kid (1959), View from the Bridge (1961), Long Day’s journey into Night (1962), The Hill (1965), The Anderson Tapes (1971), The Verdict (1982), Garbo Talks (1984), The Morning After (1986), A Stranger Among Us (1992), Guilty as Sin (1993), Night Falls on Manhattan (1997), Strip Search (2004), Find Me Guilty (2006) and much much more.

Night falls on Manhattan

Though Lumet was nominated many a times for various films, he never won an Oscar. But he did receive an Honorary Academy Award for ‘Lifetime Achievement’ in 2005.
He was also nominated twice at the Cannes Film Festival.
Altogether 14 of his films were nominated at the Oscars in various categories, and some of his films, made in the 70’s, took home more than one Oscar.

Sidney Lumet died, aged 86, of Lymphoma, on 9th April 2011. As soon as I heard of this, I paid tribute to the great director by making a ‘Set of 7’ list on IMDB, along with seven mini critiques (see my list Sidney Lumet: Set of Seven on IMDB).

Day before yesterday was Sidney Lumet’s 90th Birth Anniversary.

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense

On Sunday night, 11th May 2014, I watched Men in Black 3 (2012), when it was shown on Star Movies.
MIB pic 2
I watched Men in Black (1997) back in the late 90’s, a pretty good comedy and I really enjoyed the movie (7stars). Men in Black -II (2002) was quite bad, and a waste of time (4stars), the third instalment, however, which I watched day before, was not that bad and surprising was enjoyable enough. It was kind of an amalgamation of Back to The Future (1985) and Aliens (1986). Back to the Future was an excellent science fiction comedy that came out in the 80’s (10stars, Yup! a guilty pleasure of mine), but Aliens wasn’t that great a gory sci-fi B-movie (3stars). I preferred Alien (1979), the predecessor of Aliens, which too was just OK, not bad (6stars). Hans Rudolf Giger, Swiss artist known for his work on Alien and Aliens, died yesterday, aged 74, in Gruyeres, Switzerland, after succumbing to injuries he suffered in a fall.

Men in Black 3 (2012), has the infamous comic Agent J (played by Will Smith), going back in time to, July 15th, 1969, to save the life of his partner, Agent k (Tommy Lee Jones) from being killed by a villainous alien, Boris The Animal (Jemaine Clement), who travels back in time to, 16th of July,1969, to kill off the younger Agent K (Josh Brolin), thus changing the course of history. Thus Agent J, just has to go back and make things right, and change history too, so that the younger Boris, doesn’t survive at all, preventing a future alien attack on earth, period.
MIB pic 1
It’s always fun to see new movies set in the 60’s and 70’s, when the world changed into (or rather should have) to a more relaxed and open-minded lifestyle we are accustomed to today. The 60’s in MIB3 looks fun and colourful and more stylish than the 21st century. The Back to the Future  element adds to the hilarity of the situation. And so does the retro style, 60’s, colourfully dressed, glamorous, B-movie aliens. The icing on the cake most probably was seeing Bill Hader playing Andy Warhol, and that too at ‘The Factory’. That was hilarious, he was spot on, until he removes the wig and dark glasses and exposes the great artist as an undercover agent for MIB. And added to that, apparently all the models are actually Aliens in disguise. Ha!! wonder what Andy Warhol would have said if he were alive today. He most probably would have had a good laugh and opened a can of Campbell’s soup.
Overall, the movie was pretty enjoyable, yet predictable. There is nothing new, that has not been done before. The rush to Cape Canaveral, Florida, where Apollo 11 is set to shoot into space is fun. That’s the enjoyable part, of interconnecting actual events with fictional ones, pertaining to the movie. We also see Neil Armstrong (played by a virtual unknown, Jared Johnston) briefly, ready for take off.

Barry Sonnenfeld, isn’t among my favourite directors ever, but I don’t dislike him either. MIB, the first was pretty good, and the latest is watchable. The worse movie he directed, so far as I’m concerned, was Wild Wild West (1999). But I do like him as director of photography (cinematographer) for films like Big (1988), When Harry Met Sally… (1989) and the MIB trilogy, though he’s not the among the greatest, or my favourite, cinematographers ever. Will Smith is the one who came up with the idea to a make a movie where he travels back in time, for the third instalment of MIB, to Sonnenfeld. Etan Cohen wrote the screenplay.

Men in Black 3  Rating: 6/10 OK-Not Bad, can enjoy if there is nothing else to watch, or do.

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense

MIB posters

Nuwan Sen n’ The Space age

 

Last night I watched The East (2013), when it was telecast on Star Movies. Directed by Zal Batmanglij, this suspenseful thriller starts off pretty well, but soon starts to falter, and becomes pretty predictable.

Brit Marling & Alexander Skarsgård in 'The East'

Brit Marling & Alexander Skarsgård in ‘The East’

Zal Batmanglij’s The East deals with a group of anarchists, who call themselves ‘The East’, who execute covert operations against major corporations. Brit Marling plays an operative for an elite private intelligence firm, who infiltrates this group to find out information of their intended targets. Here she meets an interesting group of characters who don’t seem as bad as they sound. In fact they seem more like a peace loving group of hippies with great, self-righteous, philosophies. Alexander Skarsgård, Ellen Page, Toby Kebbell and Shiloh Fernandez play the four main lead anarchist characters. Soon we see the lead character being seduced into loving the anarchist group. But are they actually any better than the conniving evil corporations they target?? The lines are pretty blurred. As I’ve stated many a times in the past, nothing is ever black or white, not even a black and white movie, there’s always shades of grey. So it is, in the case of this movie as well, we can not pin point which side is bad and which is good. Both, the evil firms and this eco-terrorists’ group, have their negative side. It’s morally wrong to side with either of them completely.

The Best thing about the movie are the Jams. Especially the first one, where the radical group dose a pharmaceutical giant, along with all the people in attendance, with his own faulty drug, at a function. But what about other innocent people there?? Aren’t they killing off other ordinary people to teach one company a lesson? Collateral damage?? But who gave them the right to play god??? The pharmaceutical company is wrong to introduce a faulty drug out into market. But that doesn’t make what ‘The East’ does right. A very thought provoking movie. I enjoyed it up to the second jam. Just after the second jam, one of the crucial members of ‘The East’ gets shot (I shan’t give away which one), and consequently another member decides to leave. Post this the movie stars to falter, and becomes pretty predictable.

The whole cast is superb, as is the direction of this movie. Yet the movie could have been so much better. The film also stars Patricia Clarkson, Julia Ormond, Jason Ritter and Billy Magnussen. Rating : 6/10 

The EastNuwan Sen’s Film Sense

Check out what I blogged about today, last year and the year before :-

Bookish Nuwan from 12th April 2012

The American Civil War & Yuri Gagarin from 12th April 2013

Enjoy

Nuwan Sen 🙂

Bookish Nuwan

Nuwan Sen n’ The Space age
Nuwan Sen’s Historical Sense

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense

We all know that Alfred Hitchcock had a penchant for blondes, yet he had wanted to actually work with Audrey Hepburn. Now it’s been confirmed, that he had actually started work on a film, back in the mid-1950’s, starring Audrey Hepburn in the lead, set in Paris, but the film never got completed. The film was temporarily titled, The Mysterious Disappearance of a Bride-to-be.

Audrey Hepburn Hitchcock

The Synopsis
To start off, the blonde victim in this movie, for change was not a female character, like in most Hitchcock films, but a male. None other than Roger Moore (a virtual unknown at the time) in a brief appearance, whose character gets killed off just the night before his wedding. Elizabeth Taylor too has a cameo as Moore’s fiancée.
The plot deals with Audrey Hepburn, playing detective, after her best friend (Elizabeth Taylor), goes missing hours after Moore’s character’s death. After going through a cornucopia of mysterious events, Hepburn’s character discovers that the puzzling trail leads back to none other than both, Hepburn’s character’s own ex-husband and current husband (supposedly to be played by Gregory Peck and Anthony Perkins, respectively).

Roger Moore Hitchcock

Elizabeth Taylor Hitchcock

Unfortunately the film couldn’t be completed in the 50’s, and by 1963 Hitchcock wanted to re-start the project, after completing The Birds (1963), and Hepburn having finished working on Charade (1963), and Taylor on Cleopatra (1963). Due to various other commitments, both the raven haired beauties had to decline the offer. Thus Hitchcock went on to work on his next project, Marnie (1964), with Sean Connery and Tippi Hedren. A pity, otherwise this spy thriller would have made for an enjoyable piece of Cinema.
The film footage was located in a vault of a retired American Professor, residing in Paris. Of course by now, some of you might have guessed that this is a story I concocted, for today, April fools day. And some of you might not have been so clever. I wish for the latter. Ha!! Happy April Fools Day.

Cheers
Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense
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