Tag Archive: Stanley Kubrick


STANLEY KUBRICK, THE BEATLES AND THE LORD OF THE RINGS

Originally posted on MOVIES & MUSIC CAFE

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It’s now been an incredible 15 years to the day that Stanley Kubrick went up to the great editing suite in the sky. He is regarded as one of the best directors of all time, with some incredible work under his belt. There are some stone wall classics in his arsenal, including the likes of A Clockwork Orange, The Shining and 2001: A Space Odyssey. However, he missed out on the opportunity to direct one film to rule them all.

Before 2001 became a success, Kubrick had directed the equally celebrated Dr Strangelove with Peter Sellars. It’s a well known fact that , and John Lennon in particular, were big fans of Sellars. They obviously saw Dr. Strangelove and fell head over heels for it’s anarchic humour.

At the time, Lord of The Rings was doing the rounds amongst rock’s establishment. Many a hippie was in love with Tolkein’s book of fantasy, including the likes of Led Zeppelin. It seems John Lennon also had a penchant for Hobbits and Orcs because he approached Kubrick to direct a film adaptation of Lord of The Rings featuring the fab four.

Apparently Lennon’s plan was for himself to play Gollum, Paul to play Frodo, Ringo as Sam and George Harrison as Gandalf! Weird right? Unfortunately for , and perhaps luckily for everyone else, Tolkein, instead of saying “yeah, yeah, yeah” said “no, no, no” and the idea was scrapped.

Here are some pretty funny and awesome movies posters made up by some talented artists…

dean reeves

Dean Reeves

mike groves

Mike Groves

shane parker

Shane Parker

Here was what I (Nuwan Sen) posted as a comment on Tom Ford’s blog :-

Yes, I first heard about  wanting to do a version of the Lord of the Rings around the time LOTR was being made (thus just around the beginning of this century).
A pity it was scrapped, for I would have actually liked to see a 60′s version with .
Kubrick might have made a more surreal fantasy tale, without modern technology, sans CGI.
Nice tribute here to one of my favourite directors ever.
A Clockwork Orange and 2001: A Space Odyssey are two of favourite movies ever.

My Favourite movie by decade, My Favourite Oscar Winner per decade (Oscar 2014 Special)
RH NS
Back in April 2011, I made a list titled My Favourite movie by decade, and in November 2012, I made a list titled Why I love …., comprising of my TOP-10 all time favourite movies, and critiquing on each one of them, on IMDB.
This evening, prior to watching this years Oscars, which will be shown live tomorrow early morning (i.e. tonight in the United States), I decided to do a post, both about my Favourite movie from each decade and my Favourite Oscar Winner per decade. For my Favourite movie from each decade is not necessarily the Best film of the decade, neither is it necessarily an Oscar Winner for ‘Best Picture’.

Three Centuries, Ten decades (I’ve omitted out the first two decades of the 20th century, for I don’t have a favourite from those two decades so far)

PRE-OSCARS
The 19th Century
1890’s
L’arrivée d’un train à La Ciotat (1895)
French Film (Silent Cinema)
The very first moving picture made, by the two Lumière brothers, Auguste and Louis Lumière. It just showcased a train coming to a platform and stopping. Sadly, like the Birth of a child, which starts with a frightened baby crying his/her lungs out, the Birth of Cinema, was marked with tragedy. People had never seen a moving picture before, and when the audience saw a train approaching towards them, on the Big screen, they started to run. So Lumière Brothers’ L’arrivée d’un train à La Ciotat resulted in a tragic stampede.
I saw this film, most probably somewhere in the 90’s, when I accidentally came across a documentary about cinema, on the telly. I don’t recall the documentary, for it was late one night, and I couldn’t watch the rest of the programme, but at least I got to watch the very first film ever made, and learn about the tragic aftermath. I haven’t seen this movie since, worth checking out for any movie buff.

The 20th Century  
1920’s
Metropolis (1927)
German Film (Silent Cinema)
An excellent German Expressionism, avant-garde, surreal, science fiction, cinematic wonder. I got to watch this classic on the big screen, back in 2007, at the Sydney public library, Sydney, Australia. I fell in love with this movie, set in a futuristic urban dystopia, almost instantly. And in 2008, when I was in Paris, France; I saw the metallic costume worn by actress Brigitte Helm, who played the lead female character, and the female android; when I visited the Cinémathèque Française there.
Metropolis (1927)
POST-OSCARS
The very first Academy Awards was held in May 1929. The winner for the most ‘Outstanding Picture’ Oscar (which was later, after going through many a name changes, from 1944 to 1961, known as the ‘Best Motion Picture’ award, and from 1962 onwards, till date, is known as the ‘Best Picture’ award), went to the silent venture, Wings (1927). Am yet to watch this silent classic, that bagged the very first Best film award. The oldest Best Picture winner I’ve watched is All Quiet on the Western Front (1930), which was excellent. Thus, my favourite Oscar winner from the end of the roaring 20’s, and the best, is All Quiet on the Western Front, which was the first film to win awards for both, ‘Outstanding Production’ (award name for Best Film at the time) and ‘Best Director’.

1930’s
Gone with the Wind (1939), my favourite movie of the 1930’s, my favourite Oscar Winner of that decade, and the Best Film to come out in that decade. My second all time favourite movie.

1940’s
Casablanca (1942), my favourite movie from the 1940’s, my favourite Oscar Winner of that decade, and the Best Film to come out in that decade. My third all time favourite movie.
1950's
1950’s
Roman Holiday (1953) – My Favourite movie from the 1950’s, also happens to be my all time favourite movie. Audrey Hepburn, my all time favourite film star, bagged the ‘Best Actress’ Oscar for Roman Holiday.
Special mention: Ben-Hur (1959), my Favourite Oscar Winner, and the Best Film, to come out of the 1950’s. (Also see my lists 50-50’s, The Foxy Fifties, These are a Few of my Favourites, Hepburn flicks through pictures and many more on IMDB)

1960’s
Breakfast at Tiffany’s (1961) – My Favourite movie from the 1960’s.
My Fair Lady (1964) is my favourite Oscar Winner from the sizzling 60’s.
Special mention: I think François Truffaut’s, French new wave flick, Jules et Jim (1962), is the Best film of that decade, which also happens to be my second favourite film from the 1960’s. (Also see my lists The Essential 60’s (Top 60), The Late 60’s (1966-1970) öö, My Top 5 Musicals from the sizzling 60’s & 70’s and many more on IMDB)
60's
1970’s
A Clockwork Orange (1971) – My Favourite movie from the 1970’s, and the best film of that decade.
The Godfather: Part II (1974), is my favourite Oscar Winner from the suave n’ sophisticated 70’s. A very masculine decade for film, with a blend of classy and thuggery. The Godfather: Part II, also happens to be my second favourite from the 70’s. (Also see my lists My 70’s Top 5 and The Great 70’s Picture Show on IMDB)

1980’s
Rain Man (1988) is my favourite movie of the 1980’s, my favourite Oscar Winner of that decade.
Special mention: Another Oscar winner, which I feel is the Best Film to come out in the 1980’s, is, the epic scale, bio-pic, of a modern day saint, directed by Richard Attenborough. The British film, Gandhi (1982). The 1980’s were a great decade for British, Historical and Heritage, films.
The 1980's
1990’s
The Talented Mr. Ripley (1999), is my favourite movie from the naughty 90’s.
Forrest Gump (1994), which also happens to be my second favourite from the 90’s, is my favourite Oscar Winner from that decade.
Special mention: Schindler’s List (1993), my third favourite from the 90’s, yet another Oscar winner, I feel, is the Best Film of that decade. (Also see my list The Nineteen Nineties (Top-5) on IMDB)

The 21st Century  
2000’s (2001-2010)
From the first decade of the 21st century, my favourite flick happens to be,  Closer (2004).
A Beautiful Mind (2001), my favourite Oscar winner from the last decade.
Special mention: Brokeback Mountain (2005), is the Best film to come out of the noughties. The Biggest mistake the Oscars made, this century, was not handing the ‘Best Picture’ Oscar to this gay themed epic.

This Decade
From this decade, which is only just over three years old, so far my favourite film, favourite Oscar winner and the Best Film, happens to be, The Artist (2011), a great tribute to early cinema and the roaring 20’s. One of my favourite silent films with sound.

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense
(Also see nuwansdel_02 , for the menu page, for all my list on IMDB)

Loving Film

A Clockwork Orange (1971) *
Anthony Burgess’ dystopian novella, A Clockwork Orange, from the 60’s, and it’s subsequent cinematic adaptation, A Clockwork Orange (1971), by director Stanley Kubrick, in the 70’s, were both very controversial works.
Malcolm McDowell played the lead role of the eccentric, ultra-violent and artistic Alex DeLarge.

Kubrick's 'A Clockwork Orange' (1971)
Q° 1. If the film were to be re-made today :-

(i) with an adult Alex DeLarge character, based on the original 71’ movie, which of these British actors should reprise McDowell’s superb act?

a) Ewan McGregor

Ewan Mcgregor (Clockwork)

b) Jonathan Rhys Meyers

Jonathan Rhys Meyers (Clockwork)

-or-

c) Daniel Radcliffe

Daniel Radcliffe (Clockwork)

(ii) with a 15 year old Alex – the Large character (in the novella the lead doesn’t have a last name, but once refers to himself as ‘Alexander The Large’, in an obvious reference to his phallic-centric ego), based on the 60’s novella, which of these 21 year old actors (as taking an actual teenager to play such a violent character might not be acceptable, unless the said teen is mature enough to play the role with the necessary detachment, so as not to affect his own psychological state) would be convincing enough as this underaged delinquent?

a) 21year old Brit, Freddie Highmore

Freddie Highmore (Clockwork)

b) 21 year old Brit, Eugene Simon

Eugene Simon (Clockwork)

-or-

c) 21 year old all-American, Logan Lerman

Logan Lerman (Clockwork)

Q° 2. In Stanley Kubrick’s film adaptation, the last chapter of the novella is missing. It is said, that he most probably read the American publication of the book, instead of the original British one, as in the United States the book was published minus the last chapter back then. Would you have preferred if he had included Burgess’ ending, or do you like the movie the way it is, with it’s creepy, twist in the tale, ending?

Q° 3. When Anthony Burgess wrote the book, he set it in the near future, i.e. roughly the 70’s. Now that we’ve come four more decades into the future, would you like to see a re-make set in the actual 70’s decade; with actual styles of the 70’s, of floppy hair, side-burns, bell bottoms, wide ties, the mustards, the greens, the browns, the geometric designs et al. And would you like to see the characters speaking in colloquial English instead of Burgess’ inventive Nadsat language?

Nuwan Sen’s Film Sense

Q & A (Clockwork)